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CGM question

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by zoom8942, Jun 4, 2013.

  1. zoom8942

    zoom8942 Approved members

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    OK. I thought the CGM was like a 3 day thing only used for very short term diagnostics. What I read here it seems a lot of kids have these, and wear them all the time???? How exactly do they work, and how many fingersticks do they do a day? my DS has a good many lows, and it sure would give me a more restful sleep at night. he was dx about 10 months ago and we still arent even pumping yet. its hard to get into the prepump class thats once a month. Also hes honeymooning and uses hardly any insulin right now anyway. Help me understand the CGM please
     
  2. MomofSweetOne

    MomofSweetOne Approved members

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    My daughter wears the Dexcom G4 all the time. There's a sensor that is inserted under the skin. The inserter needle is smaller than a pen needle, and the wire that is left under the skin is the width of two human hairs. A transmitter attaches to that and sends a measure of the interstatial glucose every five minutes. There are alarms on it, and we set at what number we want highs and lows to alarm.

    We still do lots of fingersticks, but the CGM is priceless. Neither my daughter (age 13) and I like to be without it. It really cuts down on the lows, especially the ones that interfere with life. It lets us know when her basal needs are changing - which is often with puberty. It lets us think about things other than diabetes, knowing it is on duty. I'm still up a lot at night, but my quality of sleep is ever so much better.

    This morning my daughter was higher than I wanted as I was just observing through the night to verify basal rather than correcting. I gave her a correction dose when I woke up, later prebolussed her for her thyroid medicine and other supplements and didn't wake her until she was at 100 and needed to take the supplements. Priceless. No more wondering how low they've dropped when they sleep late, etc.

    I highly recommend CGMing.
     
  3. TheFormerLantusFiend

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    There is one that is three day and for diagnostics only.

    But most of us wear either the Dexcom G4 sensors, which are for use at home all the time. Each sensor lasts 7 days, then we're supposed to change it. You can see lots more about it on their website dexcom.com.
    Or else we're using one of the Medtronic CGM sensors, which are approved for 3 days (if it's a sof-sensor) or for 5 days (if it's an enlite sensor). Since you are in the US, you'd have to use sof-sensors if you used them, and there is the option to use them with a pump or with a stand alone unit. Minimed's non-pump CGM is called the Guardian, and the people with pumps often just refer to the CGM as part of their pump.

    There exists a third CGM company that is not currently selling sensors in the United States, for the Navigator.

    Also, just because we are supposed to change them (FDA rules) at 7 days or 5 days or 3 days, doesn't mean we do; many of us just tell the system that we've changed sensors even though we're still wearing the same one. I am wearing a Dexcom G4 sensor right now, and I've been wearing it since May 26th; on June 2nd when the system informed me that I'd been wearing it for a week and stopped giving me readings, I just told it that I had put in a new sensor.

    The Dexcom and the minimed systems require you to fingerstick at least two times per day still. They alarm at you when your blood sugar is high or low, which is helpful for treating highs and lows faster.
     
  4. Beach bum

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    My daughter is 11 and wears the Dexcom. She wears it nearly 24x7. We may have a lapse of a day or two if she feels burnt out, but the most she's ever been off was 1.5 days.

    The sensor gives you 7 days of readings. It will alert you when it's time to change the sensor. It measures the interstitial fluid as opposed to blood, giving you a more real time reading. It is constantly taking BG readings and you can look on the screen and see what has been going on. It does not completely eliminate the need for finger sticks, but cuts down on them. We have been able to cut down on the number of lows by setting the threshold a bit higher. So for her, it alarms at 90. She will look at the screen and see what's up. She will then do a finger stick and depending on what she is doing will most likely treat.

    I love it at night, it has been such a help. Last night for example, she ran track. It alerted that she was rapidly dropping, so we were able to get the ball rolling before a bigger problem occurred (still had a stubborn low, but it wasn't a tank).
     
  5. dzirbel

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    The only thing I wanted to add was that since getting our Dexcom G4 I am finally able to get really "good" sleep for the 1st time in 2 years!! I'm amazed at how heavy I sleep now.

    I keep her CGM on my side table which is much farther than the 20 ft range and I wake up immediately when it alarms. I don't know what I would do without it now!
     
  6. zoom8942

    zoom8942 Approved members

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    Dzirble,
    I noticed your daughter uses the omnipod also which is what my son is wanting to use. does it seem like a lot with 2 different items on you all the time? DS doesnt have anything right now so maybe it might be overwhelming?

    also everyone, what do insurances need to qualify for the CGM?
     
  7. KatieSue

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    We also do Omnipod and Dexcom. She's fine with wearing both. She wears her pods on her arms and the Dexcom on her love handles. We restart the sensors and have been getting about 10-16 days out of them. Usually the tape will fall off before the sensor goes bad.

    She takes a one day break between sensors. We honestly didn't think we'd need one. But she did a clinical trial of one last year and loved having the data. Then she started getting these weird crazy out of the blue lows in the 30's and asked if we could get her one.

    Insurance needed the doctors sign off that she'd been having a lot of lows, which she had.
     
  8. Jen_in_NH

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    My 6 year old has both an omnipod and dexcom, and he hasn't ever mentioned being bothered by 2 things on him. He's been using pods for almost 4 years, and the dexcom is new in the past 3 months

    As far as the insurance, we needed a prescription and medical necessity form from the endo, and nothing else. No blood sugar logs or anything. I was kind of shocked :)
     
  9. zoom8942

    zoom8942 Approved members

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    thank you everyone. something to talk to him and the endo about. He hates doing alot of fingersticks. doesnt mind a few but he does so many sports and has some pretty fast crashing afterwards. actually he can crash being out in the cold, target shooting, yardwork, just about anything.
     
  10. LoveMyHounds

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    Before G4 my DD did 12-16 fingersticks a day. It's down to around 6 now :).
     
  11. Ali

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    The sensor helps you deal with unexpected lows and highs and longer term you figure out better basal dosages and bolus doses etc as well as how in general to pre plan for exercise and also hormonal changes. You do not want to use it as a reactive device but as a help in setting up doses and food choices for whatever the activity, stress or hormonal stuff is going to be happening. Not to mention pump site issues It is also great as a reactive device, you just want to reduce those stressfull emergency responses over a 100 year lifetime :cwds::cwds:Ali
     

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