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CGM painful for children?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by tracygthomas, Jul 9, 2012.

  1. tracygthomas

    tracygthomas Approved members

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    Hi there. My son, age 7 and Type 1, just switched from the Animus Ping insulin pump (after wearing it happily and successfully for two years) just switched to the Medtronic Revel in hopes of taking advantage of the entire Medtronic system (pump, CGM, Sentry). However, in preparation for our upcoming CGM training session, my husband and I have been practicing with the CGM's insertion process and it scares me. The insertion needle seems very long and thick. I'm wondering if any of your children wear Medtronic's CGM, if the insertion process is trying/overly painful, and if you are happy with this product. Thanks!

    Tracy
    Mom to Luke -- ds/DX age 3
     
  2. minniem

    minniem Approved members

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    We use it and like it. The main reason we chose the revel over the ping was the integration of the CGM. Now, that being said my son wears it and it doesn't seem to bother him after it's in, but he does not like the insertion. He just turned 10, so I am able to bargin with him a little bit, but he gets a little worked up about it. He does not mind the pump infusion sets at all.

    I think it's the size of the needle too he doesn't like. He can see it before it goes in and the anxiety gets to him. Now, we don't use anything on the site, just alcohol and it's over with quick. Five minutes after it's inserted he is not complaining anymore. So while I think it's more painful than an infusion site, he is able to tolerate it and it's over quick. We also keep the sensors in until they do not work anymore so we usually get 8-9 days out of one sensor. This helps as we don't have to do it as often as a pump site.

    I wouldn't trade the integration of the pump, CGM and my Sentry for now. We are really happy with all 3. I feel as if I can finally rest a little at night, knowing there is an alarm to wake me if he goes dangerously low. I (or he) did not wake up to the pump alarms so we are happy with the My Sentry.

    Good Luck!:cwds:
     
  3. MomofSweetOne

    MomofSweetOne Approved members

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    The insertion is definitely more painful than the infusion sites, but my daughter tolerates it. We, too, get about a week per sensor, so it isn't as often. I'm looking forward to Enlite's release and hope the rumors about within 6 months are true. We like the CGM. It really helps. A lot.
     
  4. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    No doubt it's a giant honkin' needle. Biggest turn off to CGMing for us. Thought we could stall long enough for the Enlite to be approved by the FDA but who knows when that will be.
     
  5. Izzi

    Izzi Approved members

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    I'm 16 and have been using it a little over a year. Sometimes it hurts, I'm not going to lie. I put it on my hips ( alittle above my behind and above or a tad below waist line) I find standing up is better. Also, I have little fat on my stomach bc I play basketball and work out, I find if I put it my stomach, it hurts A LOT. Every 10- 12changes, it hurts really bad in the hips

    I LOVE the CGM. Its A LOT less stress for me, meaning I can not worry as much during tests, sports, at the movies etc. It is truley amazing.

    A word of advice for your son: Please don't give up the first time you put it in, give it at least three changes. Also, I use it for evey 12 days, so that means wayyy les s changes then the sites!!! That's something to be happy about! :D

    Good luck!!! :)

    Izzi
     
  6. TheFormerLantusFiend

    TheFormerLantusFiend Approved members

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    I stopped using the Minimed CGM because it hurt too much, and it hurt all the time that I wore it.
    I now wear the Dexcom CGM and it hurts a little bit at insertion and that's it. It's a huge difference.

    Many of the kids whose parents are on this forum don't have a problem with Minimed sensors; some do.
     
  7. Lee

    Lee Approved members

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    One Word: EMLA

    It does not have to be painful at all, or cause any anxiety - have your Endo prescribe some numbing cream.

    With that said, my daughter said the insertion did not hurt any more then a site, without numbing cream.
     
  8. mom2Hanna

    mom2Hanna Approved members

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    Hanna only just started on the cgm. It is a huge needle to me. With the trainer here she inserted the first one herself in her stomach, it went in and she immediately pulled it right out and cried hard. I felt awful for her. She was willing to do another after a few mins, but wanted me to do it. So I did and she said it didn't hurt as much. Since then I've done the insertion 2 more times in her arm and she said it was ok.

    But just between me and the board, I hate doing it, it just looks scary, I think she is lying when she says it doesn't hurt at all and while I'm putting on my brave face, I seriously need a drink and I don't really drink!
     
  9. tracygthomas

    tracygthomas Approved members

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    Thanks so much for these responses! I love hearing the good and the bad news. Amy, I know exactly what you mean about it being scary for YOU! (My husband and I are already drawing straws to determine who will do the first insertion during our upcoming training later this week.) And Jonah and Izzi, thanks very much for your honesty about the pain of insertions. It's so helpful to hear from people actually wearing (or at least having tried to wear) this CGM.

    Thanks for the suggestion about EMLA, too, but our pediatrician won't prescribe it; she says it's too hard to monitor application/absorption rates and that it's dangerous. I know, I know, most parents on this forum say it's the only thing that makes their child tolerate the insertion needle, so I plan to get something at least over the counter to mimic (hopefully?!) the assistance the EMLA cream seems to so effectively offer. Thanks again!
     
  10. Jeff

    Jeff Founder, CWD

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    Instead of EMLA, which requires a prescription, I personally recommend LMX4, a topical anaesthetic that does not require a prescription and, in our experience, works significantly faster than EMLA.

    Here is the LMX4 page from the manufacturer:

    http://www.eloquesthealthcare.com/LMX4.html
     
  11. Ali

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    If you can work with a really experienced CDE/Trainer when you first start using the CGMS they can help find good locations and help with a good angle of insertion. It can hurt. One thing to remember is the length of the inserter needle is longer than the length of the needle that actually goes into you, but it is not a fine gauge needle and is still long enough that site and angle selection can make a big difference. Good luck. Ali
     
  12. NomadIvy

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    Sigh, I have a love-hate relationship with the CGMS. My daughter refuses to wear the sensor these days (dexcom) and I'm still waiting for the day she'll try it again. And with the "My Sentry" out, it would really be nice to get deeper sleep.
     
  13. tracygthomas

    tracygthomas Approved members

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    Jeff, thank you! I ordered the LMX-4 online with one-day shipping. We will have it before our training on Friday. I really appreciate your suggestion and the link. Keeping my fingers crossed that my son will appreciate it, too :)
     
  14. zakksmom

    zakksmom Approved members

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    Meet our CGMS

    Her name is Annie' also known as Awesome Annie. She is seven months old, we got her 2 months ago and so far she has been 100% accurate on low blood sugars alerting between 80-100. When she matures we will train her to alert high's. She has totally given our son his independence back~ :p
     
  15. Flutterby

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    We use EMLA, won't do an insertion without EMLA cream, or any other numbing cream. Can't live without the cmgs now. Love it, now only if we had the My Sentry...
     
  16. MommaKat

    MommaKat Approved members

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    Since the discussion of EMLA and LMX4 came up, be certain your child does not have an allergy to whichever product you intend to use *Before* you use it to insert a sensor. Allergic responses can make the sensor appear to not be functioning well, when in fact it's the response changing the chemical makeup of the interstitial fluid bathing the sensor.

    We've encountered allergies with both, and now to the sensor itself - very rare I hear, and it sucks. My daughter's 12, and with ice and bactine, we're able to minimize the pain of sensor insertion - but it does hurt. Sadly, until they either make a sensor out of different metal, or we find another work around, we simply won't be CGMing.
     
  17. ecs1516

    ecs1516 Approved members

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    One of my diabetic sons was allergic to the metal in the Dexcom sensor. He was able to wear the MM CGM sensor with no allergies. They use different metals.
     
  18. MommaKat

    MommaKat Approved members

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    Thanks Carol, Unfortunately we know she has an allergy to the metal in the dex sensor. We were hopeful that she'd be okay with the 24k gold / platinum mix in the mm, but it doesn't look that way. Our field rep is trying to help us find a work around; she knows a field rep in another state with the same sensitivity who's still wearing the mm, and takes an allergy med. I don't know if that'll be an option for dd. I'm also really hopeful that the enlite will possibly not trigger as much of a reaction given the smaller diameter and length. Our field rep was able to try one out and described the differences to us. I so cannot wait to try that. Dd on the other hand? She's pretty much done for now. Can't say I blame her. First her pump, then the transmitter, now the sensors? At least she still loves pumping ;)
     
  19. Darryl

    Darryl Approved members

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    My daughter has had a MM sensor inserted every week since 2007. I'm sure it hurts but she doesn't react to the insertion anymore. Once you do enough of them, it's can take than 3 seconds from when you press the button to where the needle is out.

    I recommend tilting the inserter up around 10 degrees (more straight up) from the pre-set angle, this will avoid bleeding.

    Then, I'd recommend taping the sensor down as in this post:
    http://forums.childrenwithdiabetes.com/showpost.php?p=803298&postcount=21

    After inserting the sensor, you can wait 2 to 4 hours before plugging in the transmitter, and if it lights up, tape the edge down with an additional piece of tegaderm (it will be ready for cal 2 hours after that). It's not necessary to wait 2 hours, but you'll get a more reliable first calibration if you do.
     
  20. Lizzy731

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    So you tape it down in the picture before you put on the transmitter and do not connect the transmitter for 2 hours? I'm going to try your method of taping prior to putting in the transmitter but I use opsite. But I'm curious if it matters to wait the full 2 hours to connect the transmitter? Have you tried both ways? We connect right away and wait 3 hours to calibrate and let it wet longer overnight. But the first day is always off.

    Also, do you have to recharge on the 7th day? The transmitter always goes to weak signal the day we change it, meaning we change Saturdays and usually an hour before we change it the previous old sensor goes to weak signal
     
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2012

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