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CGM in kindergarten: Good idea?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by tina, Mar 26, 2012.

  1. tina

    tina Approved members

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    My little guy will begin kindergarten next fall.

    We are currently still injecting wth a syringe and doing fine and he even is learning how to check his own blood sugar, finger pricks and all.

    I am very worried about him being in school during the day and the idea of having a continous glucose monitor that would set off an alarm when he becomes low is very appealing.

    Does this sound like a good idea? advice for/against?

    Thanks!
     
  2. mmgirls

    mmgirls Approved members

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    YESSSSSS.

    it made it so much easier. My child had never been away from me prior to school. her kinder teacher had never had a child with type 1 and had a full class, without any assistants other than volunteer moms dads and others.

    We used the CGM for low alarms only, not high numbers since it was only 2.5hrs, half day kinder. The CGM allowed for me to feel better that "something" would allert to the potential low, and have my dd not be a constant worry to the teacher. If the teacher noticed that my DD wa not being herself she would ask her for her monitor to check it out her number and call to the nurse to have her checked early.

    Her kinder teacher was great, but I think the CGM made it soo much easier. It was a safe gaurd that was not perfect but could be used in conjunction with visual cues and beahaviors.
     
  3. mmgirls

    mmgirls Approved members

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    BTW we had the alarm set at 90, which is a pefectly healthy number but if she got down to 90 prior to her snack then that means she would be low because of the short time between breakfast and snack. and I would rather her go to get her snack early and avoid a low than to be in class and have a low that needed assistance from a teacher that was not responsible for her D care.

    ALSO, apparently my dd needs extra insulin for going to school. Which I would not have been able to confirm as easily without the cgm. She has a definate "school spike" that needs a super bolus to calm
     
  4. BaltoMom

    BaltoMom Approved members

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    Thanks for this perspective. We're in a similar boat - kindergarten next year, though on a pump. I hadn't thought about setting it for just a low alarm.
     
  5. selketine

    selketine Approved members

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    William started a cgms when he was in 1st grade I think. We also kept the high alarm off (this might depend on your cgms and how long it will snooze, etc.). We didn't want the high alarm going off for the after meal spike, etc. What is important is the low alarm so if that one went off- that he would pay attention and alert someone.

    It won't replace finger sticks but it is a fantastic tool - especially at night to help ensure against undetected lows.
     
  6. lisamustac

    lisamustac Approved members

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    YES! ds started on the CGM when he was two (way before school) this has been his first year of full time school, the CGM has been a wonderful tool. I feel more confident knowing he will beep if he is going low. Ds has no feeling of highs or lows, the dexcom has been our safety net.
     
  7. mollygolly

    mollygolly Approved members

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    Definitely! My DD is in Grade 1 now, but we used in K as well. Really catches the lows before they are too low. More confusing for school staff and more work for them but much safer for our kids.
     

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