- advertisement -

Cefdinir

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by suz, Oct 19, 2011.

  1. suz

    suz Approved members

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2010
    Messages:
    284
    Kieran has had strep. onday evening he started on Cefdinir 250mg/5ml taking 4ml twice a day.

    Since then his numbers have been CRAZY. I'm talking 350+. I checked the carb content and it's only like 2.7 carbs per 5ml which I'm bolusing for. But these numbers were seeing are totally out of control.

    Has anyone else seen this with this medicine? We have our edo appointment tomorrow and I'll check with them, but I'm about to stop him taking it. of course the pharmacist was no use at all. I haven't spoken to his pediatrician yet figuring I'd wait until after tomorrow's appt.

    If this is the culprit (and not a growth spurt or anything else) then i'm wondering if there is anything else he could take instead.
     
  2. Hayden'sMom

    Hayden'sMom Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2010
    Messages:
    128
    I am pretty sure that any infection in the body can cause high numbers too.... fever can do the same thing too.... good luck!
     
  3. Becky Stevens mom

    Becky Stevens mom Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2008
    Messages:
    8,719
    I was thinking the same thing. When Steven gets strep his blood sugars will usually be high for at least 3-4 days. Is your son allergic to Amoxicillin? Im wondering why he was put on this type of antibiotic instead.
     
  4. zoomom456

    zoomom456 Approved members

    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2011
    Messages:
    340
    William's numbers go 300-400 with any antibiotic. I agree with others that the strep could also be causing his numbers to be crazy. I would not recommend taking your son off the antibiotic until you speak to a doctor.
     
  5. Amy C.

    Amy C. Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2005
    Messages:
    5,560
    It is more important to get rid of the infection than to have ideal sugars. I would guess the infection is raising the sugars. Give more insulin to bring the sugars down -- it will only be a couple of days until all is well again.
     
  6. Lisa P.

    Lisa P. Approved members

    Joined:
    May 19, 2008
    Messages:
    5,380
    I found this with a quick Google search, it may refer only to urine glucose and it may be a bad Web site:

    Diabetes patients - Cefdinir Suspension may cause the results of some tests for urine ketones or glucose to be wrong. Ask your doctor before you change your diet or the dose of your diabetes medicine.

    Update, just found this so it sounds like it's about urine, not blood, tests:

    IF YOU HAVE DIABETES, Cefdinir 125mg/5ml Suspension may affect your blood sugar. It may also cause false test results with some urine glucose tests. Check with your doctor before you adjust the dose of your diabetes medicine or change your diet
    .

    Strep is not a dangerous infection as a throat infection, many people get strep and get over it themselves or carry it asymptomatically. The reason they treat strep with antibiotic is because in rare cases it can migrate (I think to the heart) and be extremely serious. But most of the time it is not (although it can be painful). This is my understanding, at least. We always treat strep with antibiotic when we know that's what it is, but I don't think it's urgent that the infection be fought with external antibiotics, your body has its own immune system that will fight bacterial infection, too.

    I would be very concerned if a bg won't come down -- I agree that infection causes high blood sugars, and they can recur, but you should be able to knock them down. If there are ketones, I'd be right on top of it. I'd call the company that manufactures the drug if you can't get an on call physician.
     
  7. MommaKat

    MommaKat Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2011
    Messages:
    646
    A lot of family doctors and pediatricians will treat strep with something other than amoxicillin due to antibiotic resistance of many strains of strep. Unfortunately, amox just isn't the gold standard for strep that it used to be, and can even leave a few bacteria behind that survived the antibiotic. Kids who then 'catch' strep again in the not too distant future usually are sick with a stronger version of the strain they had to begin with.

    An interesting thought about the infection and the antibiotic, and how it relates to crazy blood sugars. In addition to the infection raising blood sugars, the antibiotic causes the cell wall of the bacteria to disintegrate and spill chemicals from the bacteria that are caustic and cause injury to tissue. Our body responds to this by sending other chemicals to mediate the tissue damage, but that extra fluid increases temperature and (is) inflammation, all of which increases blood sugars as well. It's only been two days since he started, so you have both the bacterial infection and the beginning of bacterial cell death / his body's immune response to that causing havoc right now.

    My DD is just finishing an antibiotic for an infection, and we had the craziest blood sugars (super highs on the second day of antibiotics, followed by lows, and then some funky swings.) I actually pulled my pathophysiology books back out to try and make some sense of it after posting a question here. I pretty much succeeded in distracting myself, getting a decent reviews on cytokines (fun word), and realized that in the end, I'm just along for the crazy ride - not the conductor.

    One other thought about strep - our body's immune system can fight strep, but it takes longer and the chemical spilling and tissue damage allow bacteria to invade deeper, leading to infection in places we don't want - the heart (Scarlet fever) and kidneys (glomerulonephritis) where the tissue damage leads to bigger problems. Before strep became as resistant as it has been the last five years, complications from strep were considered 100% preventable in kids with early detection and antibiotic treatment. I'd much rather deal with high bg numbers than stop treatment since any bacteria still alive would develop mutations that allow it to resist the antibiotic it was exposed to, pass this on to other bacteria, and result in the need for an even stronger antibiotic.

    (can you tell I really miss teaching right now?)
     
  8. MommaKat

    MommaKat Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2011
    Messages:
    646
    This is a misconception that pediatricians and nurses work very hard to combat, but it's incredibly prevalent in society. Of course, that's because this is what doctors started to think- and tell their patients - after successful treatment of strep with antibiotics for a few decades. (In other words, you can blame the medical community for the misconception it would now like to eradicate. :rolleyes:)

    Yes, the human immune system can combat strep, and one third of the population is a resevoir or carrier of strep (meaning it lives in their throat, nose, etc all the time). However, leaving it to the human immune system creates more than a rare chance of it invading to the level of the heart and / or kidneys since all it has to do is get into a tiny vessel and migrate with blood flow. The immune system will still deal with the infection, it's the spilling of the chemicals inside the bacteria that causes damage to heart valves or the glomerular cup of the kidneys (the tiny little cups that filter urine). It's actually very important to treat strep with antibiotics in patients with any form of diabetes because of the risk to the kidneys.

    My dd just read that and said I sounded rude - I definitely don't mean to be. Just throwing the info out there. This is the kind of stuff I was totally passionate about in medicine and nursing.
     
  9. Tricia22

    Tricia22 Approved members

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2008
    Messages:
    683
    Are you a nurse, because I had that schpiel running through my head before I even read your post - I'm an ER nurse... lol ;)
     
  10. Lisa P.

    Lisa P. Approved members

    Joined:
    May 19, 2008
    Messages:
    5,380

    This doesn't sound the least bit rude -- it is very informative. I was under the impression that it was a very rare thing but very serious so that's why they treated. If some damage is relatively common that makes a lot of sense.
     
  11. MommaKat

    MommaKat Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2011
    Messages:
    646
    Am, was, still have an active license and worked in pediatrics, ICU, disaster relief (Katrina and Rita), and hospice / palliative care. That last is how I hurt my back with a bad lift. I tried to change to office work, but can't really manage a decent manual bp or IV start. So, I switched to teaching 5th grade, the grade where kids get to learn the basics of anatomy and the major body systems. :eek:

    As a nurse, I am appalled at how poorly I understood type I diabetes until my daughter was diagnosed. (Not that I understand it now, but the way the difference between type I and II was taught in nursing school? Wow!! Thankfully I found this forum. Now I am trying to figure out how to get back into active nursing (I've kept current with CEUs, but not bedside care), and on track to become a CDE.
     
  12. MommaKat

    MommaKat Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2011
    Messages:
    646
    Suz, how is Kieran today? I hope he's feeling better, his numbers are better, and you're feeling reassured or getting some help!
     
  13. Lisa P.

    Lisa P. Approved members

    Joined:
    May 19, 2008
    Messages:
    5,380
    If you want to keep your hand in the teaching game you could consider offering small classes for home school students in the middle and high school grades. HS parents often appreciate an expert in the technical areas to supplement home curriculum.
     
  14. Lisa P.

    Lisa P. Approved members

    Joined:
    May 19, 2008
    Messages:
    5,380
    Hope all is well today and the numbers and pain have calmed down.
     

Share This Page

- advertisement -

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice