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care to share your secrets?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by mandapanda1980, Nov 18, 2010.

  1. mandapanda1980

    mandapanda1980 Approved members

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    Guess I'm kind of in a "super mom" mode after talking new years resolutions with my hubby(yes, way early...he started it! ;) anyways id really like to do better nutrition wise. What foods do what exactly to bg levels. I never really invested time into figuring that out...always just gave a dose for the carbs. I've read stuff here about milk slowing down other carbs? And I know of fat spikes...but how do you know which foods will spike like that?

    Anybody care to share their knowledge on this stuff?

    Also, anybody know of a cereal that's low-carb? Or at least doesn't spike like all the ones I've tested? Doesn't seem to matter the kind, it never fails with cereal.
     
  2. VinceysMom

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    I have heard that cereals that are "coated" have less of a spike and lower on the glycemic index...but YDMV. In regard to cereal: I find Lucky Charms works like a charm! (pun intended) but something like Captain Crunch is horrible! Again, YDMV!

    Good luck, cant wait to see other responses.
     
  3. Kaylee's Mom

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    I think this post will be great ... when Kaylee was first dx'd I feel I was way more careful with food ... now I have gotten lazy and do as was mentioned ... dose for the carbs. She does love cereal and we have not had a huge problem with it ... Fruity Pebbles is bad bad bad here .. but others like Fruit Loops has been fine with her .. I feel guilty like she should not be eating it .. we used to only buy Cheerios and healthy cereal ...

    I know my kids like whole grain pasta much better than whole wheat. She does like the Arnold whole grain round breads ... 21 carbs ...

    Crystal
     
  4. NomadIvy

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    One of the factors that contribute to a food's effect on the body is the glycemic index. For example , I was surprised to see that crackers, cheerios and pretzels elevate BG levels faster than juice.

    Knowing the timing of the breakdown of a particular food seems important in dosing properly (or when a bolus should be given). And also knowing how your CWD reacts to certain foods.

    IMHO food that have lower glycemic index, are low in fat, and high in nutrient content are much healthier than everything opposite those qualities. Moreover, raw foods (as opposed to cooked vegetables, for example) are richer in nutrients. And anything more processed is less so.

    I can go on but typing on my iPhone at half-past-midnight is not an easy task.:D
     
  5. Karenwith4

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    Cereal is evil in my experience - even the relatively "healthy stuff". When Em eats it she spikes fast and hangs up there even on double the insulin and 20 - 30 minutes prebolus. It's not worth it.

    We skip boxed cereals completely at home and I make granola and old fashioned oatmeal now which are lower GI foods. There are other relatively simple things you can do to lower GI. Choose lower GI sweeteners (honey and maple syrup instead of sugar), sprouted grain breads, switch to brown basmati rice, make your own salad dressings with vinegar and lemon juice. Eat higher GI foods (like potatoes) in moderation with lots of lower GI foods at the same meal.

    A good place to start researching this is the g.i diet and the g.i cookbook by rick gallop.

    good luck
    Karen
     
  6. ecs1516

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    There are a couple of good books on GI indexes.
    "The Glucose Revolution" by Jennie Brand-Miller
    "The New Glucose Revolution Shopper's Guide to GI Values" by Jennie Brand-Miller.

    Many cereals are very hard. There are some that have a lower GI. We avoid rice krispies and plain cherrios. They are really bad for us. I find they can handle eating cereal better later in the day not first thing in the morning.

    Also, some people do a "super bolus" where they give the bolus plus any basal for that hour up front then cut off the basal for that hour. Not sure if you are on the pump.
    Also pop tarts are evil. We have found the fiber pop tarts work sort of.;)

    Waffles with sugar free syrup works well for us.
    If they have cereal at breakfast they have to have wheat toast or something else with it to slow it down.

    We also have always had our breakfast ratio lower(more insulin) than anytime of the day.


    Another good book is "Think like a pancreas" by Gary Scheiner.

    We also found the instant oatmeals with sugar are just as bad as cereals.
     
  7. mandapanda1980

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    See, I'm way behind. I don't even know what glycemic index is. Does it say anything on the label about it? I will definately be looking into that.

    What else slows down carbs? I've heard milk, and now whole wheat toast...what's in it that slows them down?

    Good to know about the crackers...

    And we love waffles with sugar free syrup here...how much do you count for the syrup? I find it relatively hard to measure...
     
  8. majicmaid

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    Plain Fiber One is great. It has 25g of carbs with 14g of fiber, so you can substract that for a total of 11 net grams of carbs. Don't buy the other flavors though as they're loaded with sugar. I've learned a lot reading the labels. The "sugar" cereals seem to have fewer carbs than the "healthy" ones. Maybe it's because they've reduced the sugar. The "healthy" cereals do have more vitamins though.
     
  9. majicmaid

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    Oh and www.nutritiondata.com is great. It lists all the nutrition info on specific foods and lists the glycemic load. The lower the number the better.
     
  10. ecs1516

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    You really can't find the GI number on a carb label.

    We measure the syrup with a 1/8 cup measuring cup. I have done it so long now that I can actually eye ball it.
    I count 6 carbs for Cary's sugar free syrup for 1/8 cup.
     
  11. nanhsot

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    My son's personal trick with cereal is to not count the milk. Clearly a YDMV moment, but he would go super low with cereal before, now that he acts like the milk is nonexistent, he stays steady after cereal.
     
  12. denise3099

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    Try chocolate chips instead! :D 1 Tblsp of choc chips had 10 carbs and fit in all the little holes. We sandwich a tbsp of choc chips between 2 whole grain waffles. dd eats this every single day for breakfast. it's neater than syrup--you don't even dirty a fork--and you don't have to figure out how much syrup is left on the plate. Plus measuring syrup is not fun in the morning.

    DD eats choc miniwheats every single day for lunch. It does not spike her bs at all and I have no idea why.

    Basically, anything to slow the food down will have a lower glycemic index: fat, fiber, protein, anything that's not straight glucose. It also has to do with the type of sugar in the food and how many steps it takes the body to break it down into glucose. But even if you have something high glycemic, you can add fiber and fat to the meal to slow the absorption and digestion.

    (Yes, if you were keeping track, dd does have choc twice a day. :eek: )
     
  13. mandapanda1980

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    I find all this very interesting. Especially the glycemic index and all that. I will definately be doing some research. :)
     
  14. mandapanda1980

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    I like the waffle idea...I personally enjoy peanut butter with mine :) dd never really took to that but I bet choc chips will have a different effect lol

    And choc miniwheats...I will try those too...see how it affects her. Fiberone sounds great and I know its good for you, but my 5 yr old is pretty picky...don't know if she will eat it.

    The higher in fat makes sense for slowing the carbs...seeing how milk helps and milk is pretty high fat. Do you all drink 2% or whole or what? We used to drink whole because dd is so tiny and skinny but have switched back to 2%.
     
  15. timnshann

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    Still fighting the cereal battle myself:rolleyes: but for pancakes and waffles we have found that instead of syrup, we use some flavored fruit yogurt (NOT fruit on the bottom but the mixed) with some whip cream. The fat in both the yogurt and the whip cream seems to slow down the spike of the pancakes.
     
  16. StillMamamia

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    The "New Glucose REvolution" books are quite helpful.
     
  17. JoelsMommy

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    My son loves waffles. But even the sugar free syrup sends his sugar sky high. So we put Redi Whip on it, and he loves it; thinks it's a great treat. He eats quickly enough that the waffle doesn't get too soggy.
     
  18. joy orz

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    Best tip is to keep a detailed food journal.

    With that I discovered that Ava needs no insulin for avocado, though it has carbs, she needs a half dose for all fruit but grapes, and no insulin for watermellon.

    Also, she doesn't spike from grapes, or a ham sandwich, but if you give those two foods together, watch out.

    You'd never find these things in a book, unless you start writing it yourself. Each kid is different in the way their body digests food.

    Also, for some random reason, Lara's rolled oats causes a spike, but Bob's Red Mill doesn't. They are the same rolled oats - not instant, maybe it's the way they are toasted or something. Go figure.

    So my best tip, keep a detailed food journal and refer back to it.
     
  19. mandapanda1980

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    I used to log it all in the beginning...just ended up getting lazy and stopped. I just recently started again now that were pumping. Keeping an eye for trends :)
     
  20. onthego

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    I was just looking at the handout on the Glycemic Index we received at dx. I was surprised to read that Frosted Flakes are low GI- while all the Chex cereals (including Crispix which my son loves and wreaks havoc on BG) are on the high end. Froot Loops, Life, Raisin Bran, Mini Wheats, and Special K fall in the mid-range. Cereal is an every morning affair around here- wish I could convince DS to eat something different. I know I could force the issue, but I guess I've decided to learn how to deal with the D-issues surrounding cereal since he enjoys it so much. The super bolus has helped us alot, altho we add 2 hrs. worth of basal to the bolus and do a temp basal off for 2 hrs. rather than 1 hr as someone else posted. The trick is to tweak it depending on what kind of cereal he's eating- if it's Crispix, I'll add in the basal, then reduce it 80% rather than 100%.
     

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