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Capsacin.....from the horses mouth.

Discussion in 'Research' started by carbz, Mar 27, 2011.

  1. carbz

    carbz Banned

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  2. carbz

    carbz Banned

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    Makes me wonder...


    "It also shows that diabetes can, indeed, be cured, and that's a fact that the conventional medical community simply does not want to acknowledge," Adams said. "Treating diabetes is far too lucrative. Embracing a cure would devastate the drug companies and health care businesses that depend on a diabetes epidemic."
     
  3. ecure

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    As you know in my previous post, the technic of diabetes treatment with capsaicin is under patent.
    3 years after the discovery , one patent have been filled in 2009 ..
    The patent protects the technic of diabetes treatment with capsaicin injection . patent is here: http://www.google.com/patents?id=zO3KAAAAEBAJ&printsec=abstract&zoom=4&source=gbs_overview_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false
    So it will prevent other researchers to start a trial without the authorization of inventors.

    It's a big law firm of Washington who have filled the patent.
    The firm name is on the patent..

    How's possible to patent a technic?? It blocks the progress of the medecine . The inventors are really quiet and the research is dead.
     
  4. Ellen

    Ellen Senior Member

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    Last edited: Mar 27, 2011
  5. kimmcannally

    kimmcannally Approved members

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    Here is the title of that article
    Astonished researchers report capsaicin injections cure Type 1 diabetes in mice

    Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/021345_diabetes_capsaicin_Type_1_diabetes.html#ixzz1HqNana4n

    Yea, mice have been cured of Type 1 about a billion times now. Doesn't equate to people.

    According to consumer health advocate Mike Adams, author of "How to Halt Diabetes in 25 Days," Dosch and Salter's study proves that Type 1 diabetes -- like Type 2 diabetes -- is "a disease of cellular miscommunication.

    Sounds reputable. :rolleyes:
     
  6. ecure

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    I said the inventors are quiet... They will not reply to emails. If you want increase your chance, it's to go at hospital directly and interview them live.
    You may have luck with phone call too if you don't get a voice mailbox.

     
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2011
  7. Ellen

    Ellen Senior Member

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    I write to researchers all the time and find them incredibly generous with their time and forthcoming responding to my questions....so I really don't have the same experience you have with respect to communicating with those doing the research.
     
  8. ecure

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    I don't mean in general. It's really specific to inventors of diabetes treatment
    with capsaicin. Let me know if you are able to get update from them.. I'm not sure the inventors are still interested to start a trial on human.. One trial in 2007 was scheduled. We are in 2011 and we didn't get any update.. I just noticed in 2009 a patent have been filled. The patent prevents other researchers to start a trial on human without authorization of inventors. It's the real problem .. It should be really tested... I had very good results with just natural pills.. Can you just imagine with injection? It could be a revolutionnary cheap treatment.


     
    Last edited: Mar 28, 2011
  9. karri

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    Funny coincidence, this big law firm in Washington has a longtime client relationship with certain Swiss pharmaceuticals company.
     
  10. buggle

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    I'm pretty sure I emailed them about 3 years ago, but I can't remember for certain. I saw an article about this study before my son was diagnosed and thought it was interesting. When we found out he had diabetes, the first thing I did when we got home was look up this research and try to find out if anything was done about it. I read their original Cell paper and it is really interesting stuff. It's a bit hard to wade through and I'm trained as a biologist. It's been a few years since I read the paper, but I'd be happy to send it to anyone who'd like to read it. Just PM me and I'll email you the PDF.
     
  11. buggle

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    I may be way off base on this, but it could be that they discovered that other issues were created by killing off the nerves in the pancreas in their NOD mouse models. I don't understand the function of sensory nerves in the pancreas, but that would be worth looking into for anyone interested in this research.
     
  12. buggle

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    This article explains the basics of the research fairly well.

    http://docnews.diabetesjournals.org/content/4/4/12.full

    The research initially caught my eye -- before diabetes entered my life -- because I'd done a small amount of work with Substance P.

    I think that Substance P injections would be a lot safer than capsaicin. But like C-peptide, Substance P is a naturally occurring peptide and no one is going to release it as a drug unless they can alter the structure of the molecule and patent it...
     
  13. ecure

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    The capsaicin kills sensory nerves firstly during the exposure.
    As soon as the exposure ends , the sensory nerves will heal . It's auto-healing process.

    So I'm willing to try a trial on capsaicin without any problem.
    FDA approved several trials on dangerous chemical compounds . Capsaicin is not risky compare to all those chemical compounds FDA approved for trials.
    Capsaicin countains the substance P. Moreover, FDA even approved dangerous chemical compounds for treat certains diseases..

    Here it's old post in 2007 about capsaicin.
    http://forums.childrenwithdiabetes.com/showthread.php?t=8643
    quoted from hospital email:
    "Work in our Sick Kids Laboratories hasprogressed well. All of our initial findings have now been confirmed inadditional, independent experimental settings. We count ourselves lucky tohave come up with several exciting new findings, both in animal systems aswell as, more recently in humans, including diabetes patients. "

    ** so the hospital confirmed trial on human with good results. but we never had the results publicly. It's the problem in current medecine. The raw results are not available to the public.
     
  14. DadCares

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    I think Ellen has the best solution. We need to contact this researcher and see if we can learn their status and if they are still pursuing this therapy.

    This research effort really got me excited a few years ago when it came out. I remembered the neuropeptide substance P. I didn't realize until now that Capsaicin was a similar approach using neuropeptide substance P. I kept thinking their research was dead because we never heard anything new from Dr. Hans Michael Dosch.

    I don't think the following statement clearly implies they did any testing on humans, but maybe I didn't read the article closely enough: "Work in our Sick Kids Laboratories hasprogressed well. All of our initial findings have now been confirmed inadditional, independent experimental settings. We count ourselves lucky tohave come up with several exciting new findings, both in animal systems aswell as, more recently in humans, including diabetes patients."

    So the real question is, have they tested anything since December 2006 (over 4 years ago)? Were the results less enthusiastic (or failed) so they didn't follow up? Were they resource constrained and focused on promising MS therapies? Or, is there promise? Are they enthusiastic but waiting funding?

    We need to contact this lab or Dr. Dosch himself.
     
  15. DadCares

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    I just sent an email to Dr. Dosch and his assistant. I will share results if I hear back.
     
  16. My_Dana

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    Perhaps, but why would one file a patent for a failed and non-promising process?:confused:
    In my opinion you only go through the expense of filing a patent to be the exclusive user of that idea and block someone else from using it.
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2011
  17. DadCares

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    Dana's Dad: Based on posts by some past posters, I think the conspiracy theory (or one of the many) would go like this. Because drug companies care solely about profit, there is never a circumstance where any individual human with decision-making power at the company would want to see millions of Americans, including some of their own children, find a cure. So a drug company might buy rights to a promising patent to kill the research so it doesn't compete against it's other cash cows, such as insulin sales, operating equipment to support amputations from diabetes complications, etc. Moreover, every decision-maker (zero exceptions) would let this secret release. To make matters worse, JDRF does not want a cure and is giving us a head-fake. Since some of their funding involves partnerships with drug developers, they are clearly "in bed" (other people's words) with them. There must be some kick-back of money that keeps them quiet and happy, and, of course, no one with decision-making power at JDRF, including those who have lived with type 1 since childhood would let a passion for a cure overcome a desire to get rich.

    That's the best I can do to summarize a couple conspiracy theories. Like you, I find it more productive to research who owns this patent and how we can monitor or even support their efforts for next-step testing.

    Looking at buggle's post, she has a valid point. Someone could have bought the patent, run some tests and realized this therapy will never work because of other side effects.
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2013
  18. buggle

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    I don't think it's a conspiracy theory to realize that drug companies are not going to spend a billion dollars to bring a new drug to market that any competitor can then market as well. It is a business after all, and they have stock holders who expect them to run like one. Unless they can get a patent, they will not develop a new drug. They don't just use patents to keep other from using an idea, they use them to create a product - ex-- novolog, apidra, lantus, etc. And natural substances from the body are hard to patent. Therefore, they will alter the molecule. The C-peptide work that was going towards commercialization was all work with fragments of the native peptide. There are concerns about altered peptides -- insulin for one. Unless our kids are using Regular, they are using an analog of insulin and no one truly understands what happens at the various receptors with analogs -- insulin has dozens of functions. We had a discussion on a different thread about this a while back. I used to do research in peptide structure and function, doing exactly this -- chopping up peptides into fragments, making alterations in the structure and then testing the physiological function. So, I feel like I'm basing my concerns on at least a bit of real-world knowledge.

    I don't know what's going on with Dosch's research -- if it has the potential to commercialize or not. When I tried to track what they're doing 3 years ago, shortly after they published the paper, they formed a pharmaceutical company. So, they must have thought it had some promise at that point. I haven't had the time to look into it again, so I don't remember the few details that I could find. I think that injections with Substance P have more promise than using capsaicin. But there is no way that human trials will ever take place with Substance P, though it's possible that if it shows promise that eventually a fragment or analog with a substitution of some sort would be tested. Like many ideas, this one will probably just disappear.

    ETA: The original Cell paper is now available online. http://www.sciencedirect.com/scienc...005c5bbec0825d0bed0cab16767&ie=/sdarticle.pdf
     
  19. ecure

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    A lot of people in industry already know the fact about the problem for the medecine to cure the diseases.
    It would be interesting to have an investigator journalist to put all those facts in front of the mass public. A big tv show in USA or Canada would be perfect for conscientized the public. I just hope not all big tv channels are controlled directly or indirectly by the drug groups. Money is a power magnet and you have probably heard about the media convergence.

    Thank you
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2011
  20. DadCares

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    That was quick. I just received the following from Dr. Dosch. I intend to learn more information.

    >>>
    while we have made good progress with relevant pre-clinical research in (mostly) humans, actual progress towards phase-I/II trials of sP in recent onset T1D patients continues to be limited due to lack of funding and regulatory hurdles.
    we will keep trying...

    H.-Michael Dosch, MD, Ph.D.
    Professor of Pediatrics
    Professor of Immunology
    University of Toronto
    The Hospital For Sick Children
    NMH Program
    >>>
     

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