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Can we discuss the value of videos?

Discussion in 'Other Hot Topics' started by lynn, May 31, 2011.

  1. lynn

    lynn Approved members

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    I've been reading and thinking about the conversations about videos the past couple of days. I remember when the "walk videos" were first shared here on CWD. Most of them were accompanied by serious music and showed the world all of the hard parts of diabetes: The needles, the highs and lows, the waiting to eat while the carbs are being figured, the nighttime checks, and so on. I remember sitting in my living room and crying my eyes out watching those videos!

    And then I moseyed over to youtube and found more diabetes videos. Suddenly it wasn't only the pull-on-the-heartstrings kind of diabetes videos I was watching. I found educational, political, comical, idiotical:p, you name it, it was there. It started a shift in me.

    Diabetes has lived in my son for five years. In those years I have evolved from wanting the entire world to know that my poor baby has diabetes to not even paying attention. I've moved from noticing every single reaction of every single person in every single public place from every single finger poke or shot to not giving a crap if anybody or everybody is watching. Time has changed my perspective, it has softened the pain of my baby having diabetes.

    I, five years ago, NEEDED people to know because it was such an enormous thing to me. Those tear-jerker videos helped me move away from that. They helped me to accept this life. They showed me that we are really nothing unique. I think that is a major key---we are nothing unique.

    I love the videos and articles that people post on this site that show the successes of people with type 1 diabetes. I love to be able to tell Nathan about the race car driver who has diabetes and puts his cgms on his steering wheel and has a straw mounted by his mouth so he can drink orange juice if he begins to go low. I love to tell him about the olympians, the actors, the people who have lived with diabetes longer than anybody he knows has even been alive. I love that. Nathan has no idea that diabetes stops anybody from doing anything. No idea at all, and I have you guys to thank for much of that.

    Even though I have grown past the sappy videos, I have to admit they still hold some value for me. Do I want Nathan's whole world to feel sorry for him and afraid to have him around? Of course not! Having an invisible disease is tough though. I have a daughter with arthritis and I can see the same thing with her. My son with the brain disease as well. All three of them look "normal" and healthy. I would say that they most definitely are normal and not-sick-healthy. They are not like those who don't have any health issues though. They have to stop and check and treat blood sugars, or they can't bike those couple miles to the ice cream place during an arthritis flare, or they can't go go go without a nap because of a brain that will be recovering for years to come. So, while I don't want everybody feeling sorry for my kids and I am raising my kids to not desire that either, I DO want some understanding and some loving accommodations made when they just CAN'T do what everybody else is doing.

    It is such a fine line to try to balance.

    Thoughts?
     
  2. Becky Stevens mom

    Becky Stevens mom Approved members

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    Im just seeing this;) I absolutely agree with this Lynn. I too have showed Steven the inspiring videos of people with type 1 doing everything they wanted to. Steven has sent out football cards of his favorite player Jay Cutler, to many kids from CWD because he wanted them to know that just because Jay has type 1 doesnt mean that he cant play pro football. And he watched the Indy 500 with me as we cheered on Charlie Kimball to his top 15 finish in his first race. Charlie is the first person to race the Indy 500 who has type 1 diabetes. I am friends with Will Cross on FB who is the first person with type 1 to summit Everest. I have always encouraged him to reach his goals and not let type 1 stand in the way.

    But I also understand the need for the other type of videos and for there to be people who feel the need to look at all aspects of living with type 1 diabetes. And I wont do myself any good by denying that there are some people out there that have a rougher time with this disease then we do. Do I dwell on it? After 7 years I can say unequivocally, no;) I dont dwell on it but Im also a realist and I do understand that some people are just beginning this journey while others are much further along up that mountain to their own summits.
     
  3. kiwimum

    kiwimum Approved members

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    In my opinion, and it is only mine, both sorts of video's have their place.

    I too remember those first few days/months/years, settled in front of my computer screen sobbing for what I had lost and what it meant to have Diabetes living in our house. I sobbed for all that Tyler would endure and how crap my life had become...

    But as time went on I started to turn the corner and see all the great things Tyler could do, how normal his life could be (as normal as it can when you stick yourself multiple times a day and rely on injections to stay alive!).
    I began to watch videos of inspiring Type 1's living their lives to the fullest and realised that life could be good for us again.

    And today, 4yrs on, I no longer dwell on the bad things, I just get on with it cause that's the way it is. BUT that doesn't mean I don't have days when I want to wallow in the self pity and watch those "poor me" videos, or days that I wish my friends would watch them to see that behind our smiles and gaiety, life is not always that great...

    At the end of the day, I don't really care who makes what video or why. If it gets them through their day and makes them feel better, then great. I personally don't choose to wallow (only sometimes), but others may, and it is not for me to tell them they shouldn't.

    Everyone is different :cwds:
     
  4. lynn

    lynn Approved members

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    I remember a visit to the endo about a year ago. They had gotten a new social worker and she came in to meet us and talk to Nathan a little bit. When the nurse told me that the social worker was coming in I cringed because she and I totally didn't speak the same language. She took EVERYTHING so seriously---we just didn't hit it off.

    Anyway, I was so surprised when a bubbly young lady came in! She was so great with Nathan and they talked about all the things he likes to do. Then she started asking him if he could do things. If having diabetes means that he can't do some things. Nathan was completely perplexed as to why on earth she would think that! She left him thinking she was stupid and me thinking I am doing something right.
     
  5. kiwimum

    kiwimum Approved members

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    Lynn, I remember the day after diagnosis, the diabetes nurse took us into a little room with all sorts of displays and things to play with. She went through D from A-Z, what it was, how, why etc etc.
    Then the head endo came in to talk to us and went through it again, answered our questions and then looked Tyler in the eye and basically said....

    "Tyler, you are a boy. Diabetes is what you have, it is not who or what you are. You can still eat chocolate at easter and have McDonalds and all that other stuff. You are still you. And you can still do anything. You will just have to plan it a bit more. And don't you ever forget that."

    I cried. And I remember it today as one of the most defining moments in our dx and D journey....
     

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