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Can kids with mild asthma play wind instruments?

Discussion in 'Parents Off Topic' started by denise3099, Sep 13, 2011.

  1. denise3099

    denise3099 Approved members

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    DD has to choose a band instrument. She plays violin and a bit of piano, but all they have at school is stuff you blow into, brass and woodwinds and some percussion. I think she should rock out on the triangle. :D She doesn't get asthma "attacks" but does have a slightly reduced lung capacity. So is this a terrible idea. I feel breathless just thinking about it.

    Oh, and she doesn't want to do it either, but if she had her way she'd do nothing but lie on the couch and watch tv, so I do have to push her to try new things.
     
  2. Marie4Julia

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    My son has asthma, and has just started playing the trumpet. I don't think it's any harder on his lungs than running for soccer is. And it is probably great for building lung capacity. I played the flute as a child, and don't remember any problem at all... but I didn't have asthma. I hope she finds an instrument she loves!:)
     
  3. Deal

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    It's actually encouraged as it helps build up total lung capacity which can help in the long run.
     
  4. AlisonKS

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    I had reduced lung capacity after a complicated surgery where I was put under anesthesia for a long time. Playing the clarinet helped me, but I wanted to play an instrument. I also played percussion and had more fun doing that.
     
  5. denise3099

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    I was thinking of clarinet. Is a reed instrument easier than blowing tight into brass? And doesn't playing the "licorice stick" sound dirty? :p
     
  6. 5kids4me

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    My son has asthma and plays trumpet- 8th grade honors band. He had a hard time initially (5th grade) and many asthma attacks. He seemed to strengthen his lungs with band practice and he had fewer attacks. He also started receiving allergy shots last December. His asthma has improved tremendously.
     
  7. sarahspins

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    I played flute (one of the most demanding instruments in terms of air volume required) throughout middle school and half of high school (and later a tiny bit in college) and the ONLY time I had problems was in marching band.
     
  8. denise3099

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    The flyer that came home did say flute was very difficult--it looks so easy. they also said drums were not as fun as it seemed and lots of kids got bored with it since it is actually work. And that the sax was heavy. I'm picking the clarinet for her (yes I should let her pick but she doesn't want to play at all--I won't force her to play forever but if I don't make her at least try stuff, she won't leave the house.) :rolleyes:
     
  9. Flutterby

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    I played flute, piccolo, sax and oboe, I didn't have many problems, except in the hot humid months of marching band for parades.. My daughter is currently learning the flute, its tough, one of the harder instruments.. my favorite to play was the oboe, love the sound.
     
  10. timsma

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    My son that has asthma the worst of the kids plays saxophone and loves it! He does need to use his inhaler some before or during playing it, but it hasn't stopped him at all. He doesn't do marching band though, he does symphonic winds band.
     
  11. MissEmi

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    I played the flute and found it relatively easy. The thought of playing an instrument with only 3 keys scares me!! LOL, I tried to play my brother's trumpet a few times and it confused the fire out of me. I loved playing the flute. It DOES take a lot of air though. I didn't have a hard time marching and playing either as far as breathing and such, just remembering the notes AND my turn/face/countermarch numbers at the same time (we were military). And I did that with undx D! I even made Varsity with not being able to concentrate due to undx D, and only 6 of us freshman made it! One of the best things about a flute is that a flute is very low maintenance if you keep it nice and clean :).
    I pull mine out every once it awhile and play some marches to keep my skill level up. It really is a fun instrument.
     
  12. selketine

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    Fourth grade here is the start of musical instruments at school and William has wanted to play clarinet for awhile so he is thrilled to get it finally. He actually asked me if it would cause his asthma to get worse so this was a timely thread.

    The flute isn't too hard to play (I played it) in terms of learning but I didn't have asthma.
     
  13. saxmaniac

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    Yes, it's a great idea to play a wind instrument for asthma. I have asthma myself, but didn't notice for many years since my lung capacity is 2x normal -- when I'm having an attack, my breathing capacity goes down to normal. That's due to playing.

    I play lots of wind instruments (hence my handle) and the ones that really require the most wind power are clarinet and baritone sax. However, if you play at a professional level, then all the reed instrument require great wind control to play with a good tone and dynamic range. I can't speak for brass.

    I would suggest starting on clarinet for a young kid with asthma. The natural resistance of the horn will help greatly.

    Flute is difficult in the sense requires a high degree of control and accuracy of the airstream, but there is no external resistance to work against. I've played gigs on piccolo and bass sax and there is NO comparison! Flute doesn't requires a lot of air volume or pressure so I suspect the therapeutic value would be limited.
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2011
  14. denise3099

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    You guys are so awesome--thanks so much. All this time I had stayed away from wind instruments b/c of the asthma. My kids play a little guitar and piano and violin. I'm so glad I asked. :D
     

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