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Callus forming on little fingers... advice or tips needed

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Cheetah-cub, Feb 25, 2014.

  1. Cheetah-cub

    Cheetah-cub Approved members

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    My 10-year-old was diagnosed with T1D on Dec 4th. I just noticed small calluses forming on a couple of her fingers. She does rotate her finger pricks, and has been doing so well in the last 2 months or so until now.

    Any products or tips to treat or prevent these calluses? Thanks!
     
  2. Amy C.

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    Everyone who pricks their fingers has calluses. My son reports that it hurts less to prick through a callus, so I am not concerned.
     
  3. Christopher

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    Rotating fingers definitely helps. If you check her at night be sure to use fingers that she doesn't use during the day. Try to use a meter that takes the smallest blood sample size possible. That way you don't need to prick her finger as hard or deep. Use a lancer that is as gentle as possible, like the Delica. Try not to squeeze too hard to force the blood out.

    Good luck
     
  4. MomofSweetOne

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    My daughter periodically removes the callouses with a pumice scrub brush when it gets so that neither of us can get blood out.
     
  5. sszyszkiewicz

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    My son has been at it since late November 2013.

    Find a lancer that has variable settings and use the lowest setting that gets you the drop you need for your glucometer. This is what we use.

    http://www.onetouch.com/onetouch-delica-lancing-device

    setting 6 gets it done for us. My son is 11.

    My son tends to use the sides of his fingers more than the middle and so far no callouses. At night I use his pinkie finger (a forbidden finger....it is very sensitive for him), because he does not use it during the day.

    No alcohol swabs, just wash and dry gently beforehand.

    Christopher above has mentioned he calculated 16,000 fingersticks and no callouses on his child's fingers! It seems the trick is just getting the minimum amount of the red stuff.
     
  6. cdninct

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    While we have not been at this for 16 years, K has had diabetes for 3 years, and he has no calluses (maybe it is his age?). We don't do anything special. My advice is the same as Christopher's.
     
  7. sszyszkiewicz

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  8. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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  9. Cheetah-cub

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    That ancient looking Autolet looks dreadful...

    I am feeling grateful that we use the Onetouch with the Delica lancer. Our setting is at a 4, maybe I will convince my daughter to go up to a 5, and perform less squeezing.

    She also refuses to poke her pinky, so we prick the pinky during the night time checks. She sleeps through most of these.
     
  10. Snowflake

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    Also, for routine checks, consider toe pokes.

    Somewhere along the way, we picked up the folk wisdom that toes can be less accurate at times of rapid bg change (anyone know if this is true??), so we avoid them when we suspect a low or after treating a low. But, assuming we have access to the toes, they are great at other times for taking stress off the fingers.
     
  11. Jeff

    Jeff Founder, CWD

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    Why are you worried about calluses? The advantage of allowing the calluses to form is that finger sticks become much less uncomfortable -- almost painless. If you change the spot every time, you'll feel the full brunt of the lancet every time. I've always recommended choosing one spot and sticking with it.

    If your daughter decides that she wants the callus to go away, choose a new location and the callus will disappear in time. And there is no permanent loss of sensation due to the calluses.

    Regarding lancing devices, I highly recommend the ACCU-CHEK Multiclix (https://www.accu-chek.com/us/lancing-devices/multiclix.html) for two reasons:

    1. The device is nearly pain free due to its design, and
    2. There is never an exposed sharp, allaying concerns of school officials who are afraid of sharps.
     
  12. Cheetah-cub

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    I had not considered that callus provides a painless way to check for blood sugar. I assumed or heard from somewhere that when there is callus, you can no longer get blood from a callused area, so this is not true then? Also, at our last doctor visit, our doctor checked her fingers, and was happy that she had no calluses back then. So, I assumed that it is our job to not allow calluses to form.

    I have considered the toes. In fact, I pricked my own toes 3 times at 3 different locations for testing, but no blood came out! So, we wrote that off.

    If toes work, which toes? And what setting? Do you think it hurt more on the toes or less?
     
  13. Snowflake

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    Our endo checks for calluses, too. I'm not sure why. DD has never had one, so I've never asked.

    On our 4-year-old, we check on her 2d and 3d toes. DD actually prefers toe pokes, but I think it's just the novelty, not the difference in sensation. We do sometimes have trouble getting a drop of blood from toes. We mostly use the Multiclix, and if I remember to do so, we do sometimes go up from the lowest setting to the next lowest setting on the toes, which yields better results.
     

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