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Beyond 'I'm a Diabetic,' Little Common Ground

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by theramosfam, Jan 14, 2010.

  1. theramosfam

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    Hello Friends

    I think for the past 2yrs I've been expressing my convictions in regards to the variations and misunderstandings both people and insurances alike often misconstrue in regards to Diabetes, particularly Type I Diabetes.

    I wanted to share this article with you, as it deeply expresses what I feel and others like who have Children with Type I Diabetes. And ultimately what we all hope and fight for tomorrow...a cure.

    I hope it brings certainty, awareness and hopfully peace of mind for our son and others like him, so that in the future they are not easily convicted by their disease which name is shared with a similar one, as he is today.

    Thank you.



    http://www.nytimes.com/2006/05/17/nyregion/17diabetes.html?pagewanted=2&_r=1
    Beyond 'I'm a Diabetic,' Little Common Ground - New York Times
    www.nytimes.com
    Parents of children with Type 1 diabetes fear that their children's plight is being lost in the din of Type 2 diabetes.
     
  2. Heather(CA)

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    I just read the article and found it negative towards people with Type 2. That bothers me. Just as I don't want my child judged, I don't wish to judge others...I don't believe that everyone with Type 2 brings it onto themselves. And, why should they learn about Type 1 and contribute to walks, they have their own stuff to deal with:confused: Most of what I've learned about Type 2 I've picked up here...I haven't actively researched it. I'm too busy figuring out Type 1 kwim?
     
  3. saxmaniac

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  4. saxmaniac

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    I don't see it. Seems pretty even handed to me. The only negative part I saw was quoted from a kid:

    "I really find it hard to take seriously the complaints of Type 2 diabetics, who, in my view, brought this on themselves," said Harry Mahaffey, a 15-year-old champion fencer from Los Angles who has Type 1. ​

    That's just reporting what he said and how a lot of people feel. The rest of the article does a lot to debunk that.
     
  5. Connie(BC)Type 1

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    Good articles
     
  6. AlisonKS

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    on the other hand
    "Type 1's, they've grown up with that discipline so ingrained in them," he said. "But when somebody tells you when you're 50, you've got to change everything about the way you eat, lose weight, start exercising, check your blood sugar, that's a heck of a lot harder than when you're 5."
    :rolleyes: whahh! but I don't want to get in the whose got it worse game this morning.
     
  7. Heather(CA)

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    Exactly....:cwds:
     
  8. Heather(CA)

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    I must have missed that? It was late last night when I read it...It seems negative to me. Feel free to post the parts you think debunk the negativity if you want. :)
     
  9. Sherry Wendi's Mom

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    As a mother of a T1D and one child at potentially higher risk, and as a T2D myself, I find both diseases awful. However that being said, most T2D have a potential of reversing the effects of the disease by exercise and weight loss. Sure there are some T2D that are not overweight or sedentary and for them a cure is needed. I don't blame those who are overweight and sedentary for their T2D, but I do blame the lifestyle. My grandparents were the ultimate in sedentary, overweight people (gram was at least 300 lbs) both had severe T2D. I myself weigh much more than I should, which I contribute my T2D.
    Anyway all that is just to say, if it came to a cure for my daughters T1D and possibility of son getting it or a cure for my disease: I would definitely support a cure for T1D before my own cure.
     
  10. saxmaniac

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    OK. Four isolated quotes (don't read them all together, it wont make sense):

    Because their disease is associated with eating and inactivity, they routinely encounter less sympathy. Often they are stigmatized as undisciplined.​

    Nonetheless, Type 2 diabetics routinely confront the view that they inflict the problem on themselves. And Type 1 diabetics say they are routinely swept up in that stigma.​

    Type 2 diabetics do not necessarily have it easier, even if they generally enjoy childhoods unburdened by illness, said Howard Steinberg, producer of a CNBC program, dLifeTV, that focuses on both types.​

    Asked why Type 2 has had a hard time finding funding, given its prevalence, Dr. Rizza said, "Our society considers obesity and sedentary lifestyle a matter of blame, and that does affect the politics and the money."​

    That's all pretty neutral and not blaming T2's for their condition. It's reporting that it does happen, not advocating that position.
     
  11. sarahspins

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    I agree.. because even at that, don't we all kind of share the sentiment? I know I get sick of the comments from T2's... not to belittle their disease at all, but most simply have NO IDEA what it's like to have T1. Not like I have any idea what it's like to have T2, but I personally hate hearing about "how bad" any one has it... you just can't compare the two We all struggle (to some degree) with our diseases. It's like comparing heart disease with a broken leg... they're not the same, but that doesn't mean that they don't have risks and lifelong effects.

    I have a hard time not letting myself become extremely judgmental about people with complications I feel like they could have prevented though - like those who gradually lose their legs little by little. My husband had some relative who was wheelchair bound and diabetic.. when I met him he was only missing his feet.. the last time I saw him before he died, he only had stumps of his legs left. That was over the span of maybe 5 years. I never saw this man test, or take insulin (or any other medications), or watch what he was eating (I only saw him at Christmas, and usually most of that day), or make any other visible action to control his diabetes. It's sad.. and yes, I do feel like he brought his problems on himself. I have no idea what kind of diabetes he had, and I don't think it matters - the point is that he could have taken a MUCH more proactive role in protecting his health, and he just didn't.

    Now, I'm not suggesting that had he done the things I mentioned, he wouldn't have ended up exactly the same way, but I would not be able to judge him as "not trying" - that's the point.
     
  12. Danielle2008

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    I will say, my grandfather is 82 with T2(diagnosed just a few years ago). He is not overweight, and has always been a very healthy man in my eyes(mentally and physically). I contribute his T2 to his age....he is just an older man, and his body doesn't work as well as it used to.

    He watches what he eats, takes his pills, and rides his stationary bike 40 minutes a day. He had shingles a few years back, and his feet do still bother him on occasion, so the bike is his best form of excercise.

    Unfortunately, there are times his BG is not the best (like the last two weeks, after he had surgery to put a pacemaker in). He doesn't take insulin, like I can, to lower his BG. The only option he has at this time, is to jump on his bike, and try to bring it down. Honestly, I do feel bad for him in situations like that. At 82 years old, two weeks out from a pretty good heart scare, the last thing I am sure he feels like doing in the morning after waking up 220mg/dl is jumping on his bike for an hour to try and bring his blood glucose down. Especially, when he did not cause that number...just the stress of surgery and his body's reaction to it.

    He knows I have Diabetes, and is always saying how different mine is. He never compares, he really does understand the difference between the two of them.
     
  13. joan

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    When I read this article in 2006 this was the letter I wrote that was published in The Times. What do you think about it.? I remember being really upset about the article. Remember it was 2006 and we were avoiding sweets and he wasn't wearing a pump.
    Don't Give Up the Diabetes Fight
    Published: May 21, 2006

    To the Editor:

    Tell a 3-year-old with Type 1 diabetes and his parents that the child will need at least five insulin injections and five finger sticks for blood a day, and must measure every morsel of food he eats, exercise and avoid sweets.

    By age 50, he will have had some 85,000 insulin injections, 85,000 finger sticks and probably some sort of eye, kidney or circulation complications.

    Then tell him that he has it easier than a 50-year-old Type 2 diabetic who needs to decrease his calorie consumption, increase exercise and in most cases just take a pill to control the blood sugar.

    Which would you rather have?

    So if my 13-year-old son, who has had Type 1 diabetes for 11 years, sits next to a 50-year-old Type 2 diabetic and they discuss how difficult it is to control their diabetes, there really is little common ground.
     
  14. shekov

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    I found the article interesting but it didn't upset me in any way.

    Yes, most T2Ds could sucessfully reduce or eliminate the severity of the disease. I don't believe it's easy by any stretch of the imagination. If it were we'd all be a size 6, eat only organic foods and exercise at least 30 min./day.

    Let's get some perspective here, please.

    I love that this article gives a clear distiction between the 2 types of D and how we (parent s of T1) feel about being lumped together with T2s.

    I found it very helpful to educate those, like many of us, who didn't know diddly about D before dx.
     
  15. theramosfam

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    I could relate....

    Most of my family is Type 2. And, to this day do not take proper care of their ailment. Eat what they want, check on occasion, and only when they feel bad, are overweight. When our son acquired Type I, I remember saying to myself 'what did you do to him?!' Remembering, my own family and misunderstanding the differences. I ran home from leaving him with his dad in the hospital to prepare for him coming home to a sugar free home. I threw away everything that had sugar...crying and desparately thinking to myself...I need to cure him. Little did I know later that week, I was going to be in for the biggest surprise of my life, and the most devasting. It's not curable, like your families ailment...is what I remember and learned that his disease was an "auto-immune," disease. Most autoimmune diseases have their own names...e.g. Crone's, Celiac, etc...I remember asking the Endo, why is this called Diabetes? Basically, years back when there wasn't such an epidemic and/or early onset Type I Diabetes, there where some folks with it but not many, so it was named after a ailment that needed the same meds and supplies like that of Type II Diabetes.

    To this day...I get told by my family and friends...."maybe if you put him in basketball or some sport, he can get cured?" Or, "stop giving him chocolate, that's your problem." I have become a teacher in my own right, not allowing to get all upset when ignorant responses are thrown my way, but rather use that energy to educate them on the variances of the two ailments. Thereafter, the response is the same..."wow,' who would have known that, and why then do they call it Diabetes, period?!"

    That is the primary reason I posted this article, that and me having some difficulty trying to bring people onboard to donate for a cure. As they say, why do I need to give, if it's the Parent's fault he's that way? And, this ignorance is hurting funding much needed for a cure.

    I hope we look at this in that light and not in a negative one. I'm all for Type II getting the help they need, but i'm equally vested in helping my son have an easier less questioned lifestyle just because he has Type I.
     
  16. Toni

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    Maybe the insulin resistance comes first, the weight gain comes later? There is a strong genetic component to Type 2. Together the two types would make one powerful group who could lobby for political change. Apart, Type 1s make up a very small percentage of diabetics. I don't blame Type 2s for not being able to control their blood sugars because I don't believe a lot of them get proper advice or care from their endos.... if they are lucky enough to have an endo. A lot of them see general practitioners. And can progression of Type 2 be controlled with diet and exercise? That may also be a myth.
     
  17. sisterbeth43

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    Being a Type 2 myself and the mother of a type 1, I feel I have a pretty good perspective on both types. Yes, I am overweight, but I also have a strong family history of type 2. We found out about 10 yrs ago that is runs very heavily in my fathers family. My dad had type 2 as did 2 of my brothers and another currently has it. Were all of them overweight NO. Some a few pounds, but they would never have been referred to as obese. My niece has it and she is a skinny little thing at 35 yrs old. I know a lot of women who have had gestational diabetes that end up with type 2 no matter what their size. For myself, I now take very good care of my D. I test many times a day and try to eat better. I do take insulin and that has helped me control my D far better than diet or exercise. I must add, that because of other health problems, it is hard for me to exercise very much. I have lost about 35 pounds since I was dx'd 15 yrs ago. Not good I know, but for anyone who knows me, they know what my life has been like the last 10 yrs. I want money raised for the benefit of both types, but like someone else said, if it comes down to a choice if my disease were cured or my dd's, I would choose hers any day of the week. Sorry, I know this is long and rambling, but just typing as I feel.
     
  18. hawkeyegirl

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    I wish I could remember where I saw it, but I read an article recently that sets forth that very theory. I can't remember if it was based on an actual study or not. I'll PM the member on the other board who posted it and link to it if I find it.
     
  19. theramosfam

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    The point I was trying to make, is that although both ailments require Blood Sugar Monitoring....one is an auto immunce deficency...and it's not genetically nor heritically related to it's named counterpart...that being Type II. Those are the facts.
     

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