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Bedwetting

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by lcblk27, Sep 27, 2011.

  1. lcblk27

    lcblk27 Approved members

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    Anyone else dealing with this or have dealt with this? My son is 5, dx begining of July. I know that high numbers can cause him to be urinating a lot but its just so darn frusterating having him waking up wet every morning! He wears a pull-up to bed (sometimes 2) and he still pees right through them. I just checked him after he had been in bed for 2 hours and he was already wet through 2 pull-ups. His BG has been erratic recently, Im guessing that is contributing to the bedwetting. So, Im guessing not much can be done about this except to try to get his numbers stabilized but I sure would love to hear from anyone that has been there.

    thanks, Lacy
     
  2. Tianna's mama

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    yes I have the same issue :mad: but I think its also my tianna has a bedwetting issue. She even wets the bed on days where her numbers have been pretty fair all day. My daughter is 7 and going on 8 but I keep hoping its something she grows out of. Im not sure how much more I can take.
     
  3. timsma

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    Both of my sons had this issue. The one with D had it worse and wore 2 pullups to bed every night as well. I could tell what his blood sugar was in the morning just by seeing how soaked he was or wasn't. Tim was 8 and Brady 6 when I tried The Potty Pager for them. I bought two of them so they could both use one at the same time. It worked like a miracle! It came recommended to me from a friend. It costs $75.00 and is only available on the internet, but it really works. Tim was trained in a week on it and my other son in just under a month. I can't recommend this system enough! Their self esteem went up after being trained with it, and my laundry went down to a normal level. No more washing bedding every single day! Just google The Potty Pager if you're interested in giving it a try for your kids. I promise, you'll be amazed with the results! I have no financial interest in this company, just a former user that was highly satisfied.
     
  4. Amy C.

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    Many children can't get through the night without needing to urinate, diabetes or not. I think there is some switch in the brain that doesn't click in until they are older.

    My husband took my son to the bathroom every night until he was about 11 or 12. At that point, he could make it through the night without having to get up.
     
  5. Butterfly Betty

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    It's not unusual for kids, both d and not, to wet the bed until the age of 11 or 12, as the previous poster pointed out. My own two boys, non-D, did until they were nearly 10. We limited their fluids after 8, except on the nights when they were really thirsty, cause we call have nights like that, you know? We also made sure they went to the bathroom right before bed. Goodnights might work better for your child than pullups. Seems like they absorbed more.
     
  6. lcblk27

    lcblk27 Approved members

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    Thank you, I will check that out. Im certain it would pay for itself in what I save in laundry detergent, lol.

    Lisa, I will give the good nights a try and see if they work better.

    And yes, I do believe that part of it is just being a kid but I know when he was first dx and we had gotten his BG at a managed level, he was wetting through much less frequently. Im hoping we can get back to that.:)
     
  7. joy orz

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    I see he's 5. Did he just start kindergarten? Maybe the transition is hard.

    Ava has been having the exact same problem and it has nothing to do with her numbers. I'm blaming it on the school transition, not getting enough sleep, so she sleeps so hard at night.

    A while back we had good luck with a sticker chart. For every 10 dry sheets, she got to pick out a toy at the dollar store. :D Anything she wanted because it was a dollar.
     
  8. DsMom

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    Was up at 5am this morning myself, stripping sheets and helping him out of wet jammies!:( We're down to maybe one episode every week and a half or two...sometimes longer...so we are making progress. My son can wet the bed whether his BG is high or low...but it definitely happens more when he is high.

    I've taken a wait and see attitude and have not tried any bed wetting remedies. It is getting slowly better, and I know that one of my nephews (nonD) had this issue as well. Trust me, he is all grown up now and NOT wetting the bed!;):p I figure this too will pass...and, among my worries, is one of the lowest.

    That said...I DO hate getting up at 5am!!:rolleyes:
     
  9. timsma

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    I know for us it paid for itself over and over again since we no longer needed to buy pullups. I realize too, that kids all grow out of it at some point on their own. But this device helps them along and isn't a medication at all. Somehow it just trains them, magically! And their self esteem shot up and they no longer felt funny about sleep overs with kids. I see no reason to make them wait until it just 'happens' for them when such a device is so easily available. Even Tim's endo knew about this device and said it helped a lot of her patients. Pediatrician said the same thing. I was a bed wetter until age 12 1/2, and I know how that affects ones self esteem first hand. Maybe not for everyone, but for me it sure did. Tried the buzzer system, limiting fluids, all of it, and nothing worked. I sure wish this had been available back in the day. I know, I sound like a commercial! But this is just how much I LOVE this product and what it did for my sons.
     
  10. sarahspins

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    I don't know that it's really reassuring, but I have 3 kids and I've had two bedwetters. None of them have D. I was a bedwetter too until I was about 7 (not every night, but often enough that I remember still having accidents), but I didn't have D at that point.

    My oldest did it the longest.. it didn't mostly stop until he was almost 10 (and we still make him wear a pull up if we stay somewhere away from home - usually he stays dry but I'd rather not take a chance) my middle didn't stop until just before she turned 6. My youngest @ 4 has only had a couple of accidents since getting out of diapers completely (back in May) but that is nothing compared to the basically daily laundry I was doing for a while there with TWO kids who could not stay dry overnight. I don't worry that my youngest will have an accident - I just assume he won't, which is weird, because the other two were definitely NOT at that point when they were 4!

    I was not a huge fan of using pull-ups full time at home for nights.. what we would do is make the bed up two (or three) times with waterproof pads underneath each sheet) so that all we had to do was strip off the top layers and throw them in the wash. I think wearing pull ups just trains them to think it's okay to pee in the bed at night, which is sort of the opposite of what they should be doing - I want them to get up and go to the bathroom if they have too, and yes that means I'd rather they wake up wet and unhappy (and I never make a big deal of it when they do, just remind them to try to go to the bathroom while I fix the bed) so that hopefully they will begin to get up if they need to go when they are sleeping.

    I can also attest to the potty pager NOT working for all kids - it didn't work with my oldest but you also can't wake him up in the middle of the night and get him to go to the bathroom either - he's completely disoriented and incoherent. Restricting liquids after 6pm and all manner of other things didn't help either... they just had to outgrow it.
     
  11. Kayeecee

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    We had amazing success with the Nighthawk. It's a buzzer system and Spencer was dry within a week of using it. And she was a consistent bedwetter until she was 8. Google it and you'll find a very low-tech, even sketchy-looking website, but it worked miracles for us. I didn't realize how demoralizing it was for all of us until I stopped having to wash sheets ever single day. Good luck to you!
     
  12. MrsBadshoe

    MrsBadshoe Super Moderator

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    It was my non D son that had ongoing bed wetting issues. It is very common for boys. Sometimes it is deep sleep issue and small bladder; sometimes it is other things. My son had bed wetting issues until he was 13 ( when he hit puberty and his prostate grew - his urologist said that would probably be the time when things would clear up if they didn't prior).

    Hopefully for your sake it is just a D issue and will clear up when his numbers level out. If it doesn't know that he isn't alone and it is something that does end. Good luck
     
  13. sneakermom

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    I thought this was a D issue for the longest time. We were spending a fortune on Good Nights. My 6 year-old would regularly wet through them. We ordered the Malem bed wetting alarm. It took 3 weeks, but she now only rarely has a night time accident.

    It works by clipping a sensor onto their underpants or pj's that is connected to the alarm box (about the size of a pump). The sensor senses moisture, triggering a vibration and audible alarm. Honestly, she is a deep sleeper and almost never woke up from the alarm. It did, however, allow me to get up and get her to the bathroom sooner and sooner until she was able to catch herself before it would happen.

    Sooo glad we did this. But every family is different and you may decide to wait it out. Good luck with it.
     
  14. StillMamamia

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    First, you want to rule out any bladder issues or infections. Just a thought.

    Second, if it's hyperglycemia related, then do some more testing and see what can be adjusted, have him pee before bed and one or two times overnight. I know...tiring, but it can help.

    Third, some kids just don't wake up as easily to pee overnight. You may end up doing this for a few years (sorry!).

    Hang in there.:cwds:
     
  15. quiltinmom

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    YES! I've been there (non-D child). He was 7 and STILL wetting his bed every night. I took him to the dr....dr. basically said to get a bedwetting alarm, and "my cousin wet the bed till he was 16. It's not that uncommon." So after a lot of balking, we finally got a bedwetting alarm. (100 bucks! sheesh! But it's worth every penny that first morning they wake up dry.) The key is for a parent to get them up and make them go to the bathroom when the alarm goes off; you can't count on the child to get themselves up. It was 2 weeks of getting up 1-2 times a night, then less and less until we felt it was okay for him to go without it (it probably took a month or so).

    And in the meantime, consider switch to diapers. Pull-ups aren't nearly as absorbent.

    It might not have anything to do with D. Sure, highs can exacerbate the problem, but it's not necessarily causing it.

    Good luck!
     

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