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Anyone's kids done an IB program?

Discussion in 'Parents Off Topic' started by Kaylas mom, Nov 12, 2011.

  1. Kaylas mom

    Kaylas mom Approved members

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    We toured my old high school today (wow.. that brought back memories) for an IB Academy Day with my middle son. IB stands for International Baccalaureate program and it seems like it would be a good fit for Noah but at the same time.. I have heard not so good things about it. I am just looking to see if anyone has had experience with the diploma program and what your thoughts are on it.
     
  2. obtainedmist

    obtainedmist Approved members

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    My daughter had a friend who was in it her first year and felt it was too stressful for her. However, some kids thrive. Molly preferred to do the AP classes so that she could pick and choose which areas to focus on in an advanced track.
     
  3. MamaC

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    Not a fan. My daughter started it in 8th grade. By senior year she was down to just one IB class (which turned out to be a class in which she learned college skills), and that one didn't even get her college credit. It depends on how the school has it set up. Ours had no admission standards like you'd find with AP courses. It was in place JUST to beef up the school's credentials (being in the lower third of the county's 27 high schools).

    By the time my son went to HS, we didn't even put it out there.
     
  4. Jordansmom

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    My daughter went to a gifted school that in Middle School transitioned the kids into an early IB program in 7th grade. We pulled her out in 9th grade. We made the decision that AP and concurrent enrollment (college credit courses) were a lot more useful to her. IB has a ton of extra requirements that take up all their spare time, dictates their extra curricular activities, and their elective classes.

    She goes to the high school now where IB classes are held and the school has mostly combined their AP and IB courses. So same education, more flexibility. The kids she has gone to school with since third grade are still in IB and most are really stressed and overwhelmed. My daughter is able to be captain of the debate team, be in the school musical, etc.

    She will take AP tests every year to get college credit. Concurrent enrollment classes give her college credit without taking a test. IB requires all of their class credit, portfolios in various subjects, community volunteer hours, tests in various subjects in order to get the IB diploma. Last year 6 kids completing the IB program met all the requirements for the diploma. Then the college they choose has to agree to grant credit for IB.

    In the end it just didn't seem worth it for my daughter and she has confirmed repeatedly that she is happy with her decision and most of her friends really aren't.

    I agree that it really depends on how well the school impements IB and also what they offer to advanced kids if they don't take the IB track.
     
  5. Kaylas mom

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    Thank you all so much. I really wanted to hear from people that weren't just promoting the program.
     
  6. misscaitp

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    I was in IB and I loved it. Yeah it's a lot of extra work but I became a well rounded person. Even though I didnt receive the diploma, I loved having the deep and challenging thinking that did not present itself in AP. Having taken both AP and IB, I really think that IB provides that extra challenge. And while not for everyone. I would have been bored in high school if I was not pushed by the IB program.
     
  7. misscaitp

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    I will say that I did go to a school where anyone could take AP. But the number of IB spaces were limited.

    I did get college credit, and I received the top scholarship at my college because of IB. And I feel that IB better prepared for the rigors of college and its analytical thinking.
     
  8. jilmarie

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    IB wasn't available when I was in high school, but I did take AP exams for college credit. I was able to finish college in 3 years thanks in part to my AP credit.
     
  9. BrendaK

    BrendaK Neonatal Diabetes Registry

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    Ditto for me. I was in it until February of my senior year in hs, when I dropped a couple of classes so I could focus on music, which is my profession now. I loved it, definitely very challenging and much more well rounded than a standard ap program. Everything, literature, history, philosophy, etc was connected to each other. I would take the opportunity!
     
  10. funnygrl

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    IB wasn't available to me in high school. I did AP and a few CLEP exams and got 21 college credits before I started.
     
  11. swimmom

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    We have an IB program at our high school. Some kids thrive in it, but they tend to be extremely motivated (well above the average). One friend set up a bed in their study for their son because he routinely does school work until 2:00 a.m. and then falls asleep in there. His only extracurricular activity is Robotics Club.

    It's a ton of extra work. If your child won't make an "A" in the IB classes, you're better off in AP classes because she will hurt her GPA and class standing making a "B" or "C" in IB. Unless she is set on going to an elite university, IB probably won't make that much of a difference to college admissions. And most kids find normal high school extracurriculars (band, etc.) difficult or impossible to manage with the IB workload.

    I would be concerned that my child would enter college already burned out.
     
  12. misscaitp

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    I would disagree with this statement. The majority of my peers and myself took part in many clubs. I had time to be Treasurer of key club, a member of NHS, worked the school store, tutored, and ran a diversity program. There were many IB students in band and that also played sports.

    Talking to many colleges it is also known that many universities see IB as the premier program and most rigorous program a student could be in at the present time. At my high school IB was weighted higher than AP, as IB was on a 5.0 scale and AP on a 4.5 scale.

    IB is all about time management, much like college. A lot of IB students like any other students are known to procrastinate. I know the latest that I would ever go to bed was 11:30, but I had set aside a time for homework.

    I would say try it. Being in the IB program is not binding. You can always leave if it becomes to much or just isn't right for you.
     
  13. Ellen

    Ellen Senior Member

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    My son absolutely thrived in IB - it was an amazingly good experience for him with outstanding faculty who truly cared about teaching and learning in the public school system. IB completely prepared him for college and beyond. I can't say enough good things about it. I know several people whose children have completed the IB program in two different Florida schools; all those students also had the best possible high school experience as a result of IB and are now in medical school, law school, veterinary school, graduate school in other programs and following their academic and career dreams.
     
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2011

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