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Anyone Regretted Getting the Pump?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by justice1315, Jun 13, 2013.

  1. swellman

    swellman Approved members

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    No regrets. Some frustration but I never think about not pumping. It give us complete control over eating and not the reverse. We no longer equate food with a shot. With a proper testing schedule there's no reason to have any fear of a pump. It's just untrue that pumpers tend to go lower over night.
     
  2. Mish

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    No regrets here. Only regret was not starting sooner.

    I haven't ever heard of anyone dying from their pump delivering too much insulin at night. Can anyone point out the FDA adverse reaction report on that? In fact, I think I can only remember maybe 1 or 2 instances that people suspected their pump was delivering too much insulin and in each case it wasn't ever found to be true.

    It's completely an unrealistic fear.
     
  3. Helenmomofsporty13yearold

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    I would go with your DD's lead. Mine did not pump until she asked for one, though she was always offered one and saw other kids at camp with one. She likes to take pump breaks in the summer so she can sport a bikini, but eventually, she tires of taking shots and puts the pump back on.
     
  4. hawkeyegirl

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  5. Jeff

    Jeff Founder, CWD

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    I am unaware of any incidents of a runaway insulin pump in the past decade or more. Such fear is unwarranted with today's insulin pumps.
     
  6. Jeff

    Jeff Founder, CWD

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  7. justice1315

    justice1315 Approved members

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    Several of you have mentioned the CGM's. For those of you that do use them, how are they working for you? Our Endo showed us one briefly during last visit and my daughter freaked out!!! The sensor/needle looks horrific! It breaks my heart watching her do so many shots. The sight of that CGM even made me a little queazy!!

    I love the idea of having that option available, but if is something that is going to hurt her and be traumatic I don't know if its such a good idea.
     
  8. shannong

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    We have only been on the pump for just over a week, but I can say that I absolutely love it. The hardest part of d-care were the nights because my son would go high during the first part and then do a pretty major drop. There was just no way to deal with it on MDI, in a way that didn't mean a ton of lost sleep for me. The ability to set different basal settings means I can sleep again ( I still do night checks but not nearly as many). Now when my son's bg is around 100 in the night, he actually stays at a pretty steady number.
     
  9. DavidN

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    We started pumping 5 months ago. One month in, I regretted switching but stuck with in. Two months in I regretted it less. Three months etc ... You get the picture. It was a tough transition for us but am glad we did it. My son is too. Not sure I could get him to switch back even if I wanted to. Whether you go pump or not, I would highly recommend the Dexcom G4 CGM. It will reduce your anxiety and, in my opinion, make your child safer.
     
  10. Mimi

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    My oldest dd didn't want to pump at all until 2 years after dx. The option was always there but she just wasn't interested. Once she finally made the decision to go with it and we started she loved it from the start.

    Me...not so much. I went from being confident in my d knowledge to feeling like I was starting all over again. The learning curve is steep and I was frustrated. If dd had even once said she didn't want to pump, I would have jumped and switched her back to MDI. But she didn't.

    So we continued, I learned and it is much better for us now. It gives her a level of independence she didn't/couldn't have with shots.

    So no, no regrets.
     
  11. DavidN

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    The best way to answer this question is with a video. Does this looks like it hurts? It's what I showed my son prior to our first insertion. He barely feels it.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z5x4M9kg-BY
     
  12. SandiT

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    As I said, I researched it like crazy, and found that even when it did happen, it was ultra rare. I wish I could say it has eased the fear, but I'd be lying... however, I think for most people, knowing how exceptionally rare it is WOULD ease the fear, and I think it's the worst possible fear.

    I've asked repeatedly about it, but both the old endo and the new were rather "not necessary" about it. I could push it, but I feel that the pump is more important as a priority, because my level of anxiety is not as important as my daughter's self esteem and sense of being able to enjoy a more typical lifestyle.

    6 months after the pump, I'll push it more, because I really do have significant anxiety about the whole thing in general and the whole possibility of night lows being that severe.

    Well, I apologize that I didn't make it clearer. I heard about it and freaked out. So I went crazy researching it, and I found that it's exceptionally rare. On the other hand, my point is that it sort of makes other concerns pretty small in the bigger picture. Once you know that the "scariest" fear is actually a pretty unlikely scenario, it makes other fears fit better into the bigger picture.

    That was my experience, anyway, and I was trying my best to articulate it--I clearly did not do well, for which I am sorry.
     
  13. DavidN

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    Then push for it. And why does it have to be one or the other? No offense but this logic is silly. If your doctors won't sign off on it, then find another endo who will.

    I don't know what this means. My son has been dx less than a year. He is at non-D camp right now and probably wouldn't be if he wasn't sporting his G4. Last week he spent the night at a friends house. We managed him over the phone but may have opted not to do it at all if not for the insight and protection of a CGM.[/QUOTE]

    In my opinion, your daughter will be able to enjoy a "more typical lifestyle" ... strike that ... a fully typical lifestyle with the added benefits of a CGM. That is if you're willing to let her.
     
  14. cdninct

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    No regrets at all! Sometimes, K gets sick of having something on all the time, but when I remind him that the alternative is shots he changes his tune pretty quickly.

    I also have no more fear about pumping than I did about shots. You could choose to use the pump to replicate exactly what you are doing now with shots and be at no more risk of lows than before. As far as I can see, the reason lows may be more common with the pump is because you can use its technology to regulate BGs more closely, and keeping a child lower overall naturally raises the chance for hypos. Pump/site malfunctions do happen to some people under some conditions (we have possibly had one bad site in 2 years), but reasonable checking cuts the risk of developing high BGs and ketones (and remember that there is a difference between having ketones, even large ones, and being in DKA). As for a pump losing its mind and delivering insulin when it is not supposed to, that's really low on my list of fears--way lower than my fear that K might be struck by lightning.

    If you can swing getting a pump financially, I really see no risk at all to trying it out. It really has changed our lives!
     
  15. cdninct

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    Oh, and the CGM has revolutionized our lives, too. I can't imagine doing diabetes without the information it gives. K does not enjoy sensor changes, but we do them at night, and they only happen every 6 days, and would be less frequent with the Dex. Once it is in, it is a non-issue to him.

    If you are interested, see if you can get a sensor sample from your endo or a Medtronic or Dexcom rep and try it on yourself. It didn't hurt me one bit (which is not to say that it doesn't hurt my much smaller son or that some insertions don't hurt more than others--it just means that it is not as bad as you might envision from looking at the needle), and that knowledge made me feel better about my decision to use it on K.
     
  16. MomofSweetOne

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    I would urge you to get a CGM. The fears you mention seem large, and for me, the CGM has relieved so much stress and fear. Until you experience it, it's hard to imagine the stress relief a CGM provides for the parent. Not wondering what is going on it one's child's birthday, sleeping with monitoring going on. I asked for the CGM after two weeks during which my daughter's Lantus dose dropped in half and she went off all Humalog (and never spiked above 120 post-prandial, to boot!) at the 1 year mark. I was beyond exhausted from feeding her every two hours during the night while I continued to reduce Lantus each night, and not sleeping well between those two hours wondering what might be happening before the alarm next went off. The rare pump fear you have is far less than using Lantus when a flu bug strikes. Highs from bad sites are much more likely, but with CGM, they can be caught early on. A CGM will do as much as a pump to give you and your daughter the most "normal" a T1 can have. There are less lows, less highs, less stressed parents,...

    If the fears are consuming to the degree you indicate, I'd be asking to talk to a counselor familiar with 24.7 care-giving and chronic illnesses. The risks are there; we know it, but they shouldn't overpower enjoying life. It's ok to talk to someone.

    I know the fear as the sibling of a T1 who has lasting complications from a seizure many, many years ago. It's why my daughter wears a CGM 24/7/365. It allows us freedom from most worry and keeps her feeling better from closer monitoring as well. This week, I've dealt with two nights of vomiting without feeling terror and not poking her every 5 minutes, either. I was able to confidently turn her basal to trickle and see how her BG was doing. With Lantus, she might have ended up in the hospital, especially the time she'd already bolus for the meal that didn't stay down. While the pump has its dangers (and a friend's daughter got 10 extra units delivered in a pump failure their first day:eek:), I tend to think on a typical daily basis, the pump provides greater safety. Your daughter is still young. With puberty, the basal needs soar and plunge without warning. For us, it usually happens in the middle of the night, but not always. I can need to change her basal from 1.2 to 3 units per hour with the quick punches of buttons. Doing so keeps her feeling well, but I also know that those extreme high basal needs tend to reverse in 24-36 hours, so we're watching and prepared to turn her basal back down just as fast as well. My daughter didn't want to pump for a year, and I didn't push because of my own fears. We were both glad she switched right as this madness began.
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2013
  17. swellman

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    Since you researched it like crazy I would assume you wouldn't mind posting your links to those instances where it did happen?
     
  18. mmgirls

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    we have been pumping for 7 years since she wsa 18 months old. Thur different ages and stages the pump has always been the best option. I have a 5 year old that may be Diagnosed on Monday and would fully consider a pump for her also straight from the get go of Dx.
     
  19. Lee

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    One that is not from a first generation pump from the 1990's would be great!
     
  20. caspi

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    We have absolutely no regrets. I will tell you that my son decided after pumping for a year to take a break and went back on MDI, but that was short lived. ;)

    As to the claims of people dying due to a pump malfunction, I have yet to see any evidence of that happening with any of the new pumps.

    As to your concern of going low at night, that is one of the joys of the pump - if your child is going low you can immediately tweak the basal amount to deliver less insulin. On MDI you can't do that.

    Yes, it's an adjustment, but well worth it IMO. Meet with the pump reps, look over the different pumps and their features, and then decide. :cwds:
     

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