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Anyone NOT do a 504?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by mommylovestosing, Nov 10, 2011.

  1. selketine

    selketine Approved members

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    Perhaps your husband could think of it as a guideline for everyone - your child, the parents, and the school. Everyone needs to be responsible and it outlines everyone's responsibility.

    If she over/undoses herself to get out of tests or homework then you have other bigger problems than the 504 - that would probably happen either way (eventually - too young to worry about that now I'd think).

    Ultimately just because he thinks X - doesn't mean it is right - or wrong. I suppose you have to go with your gut and your feelings and reasoning on the subject is just as valid (maybe even more logical) than his.

    You could always ask for the doctor to talk to him - assuming your pedi endo supports the 504. Sometimes people need to hear it from an authority figure before they'll change their thinking.
     
  2. Christopher

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    I was just going to say this ^^

    It sounds like your husband is of the mindset that, hey, the world is a tough place...you have to deal with it just like everyone else does. But the thing is, she is not just like everyone else. She has special needs. She has a disability (meaning her pancreas is disabled). Maybe he is having trouble coming to terms with her disease, the fact that she may, at times, need protection and help. Maybe once he deals with his feelings around her illness he will be more able to give her the protection and help she needs. Good luck.
     
  3. Christopher

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    I think some brilliant poster covered that earlier in the thread.... :p



     
  4. tonnia

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    At this point in her school life maybe not is okay but it is a good thing to have. I am my dd's school nurse. I have a great staff here at JH and felt no need to have a 504...why should I? I work here with all of my friends??? Well, just a few days into the school year a teacher who has known my dd her entire life and I thought was my friend called me as dd was walking into the clinic to check her BG (due to a low)and told me to tell dd to not make this a habit! As with all my past T1 I had sent out the emails for all her T1 high and low BG info. I was shocked and very upset. The counselor saw me and asked what was wrong and I told her. She went to the principal and he insisted on dd having a 504 plan. So...now she does.
    Lesson here...regardless of the great repoire you have with the school staff. They have bad days also, staffing is changed and substitutes come in. Having a 504 to protect your child is a good idea in most cases.
     
  5. purplewowies

    purplewowies Approved members

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    Ugh, your husband sounds like my dad. When I was a freshman in HS, I underwent an evaluation for Asperger syndrome, it was decided I would benefit from accommodations (which I believe were extra time on tests and a class to help with social skills). The school and my parents had a meeting, and he and my stepmom said that I didn't need accommodations because I "didn't have" AS (while my mom believed that I did and that what the school was suggesting would help). I specifically remember the word "crutch" being used. As a result, I was not given an IEP, and I got no accommodations. I did okay freshman year, probably because my teachers knew and decided to help out any way they could to get my Ds/failing grades up. However, I still did pretty bad on group projects because I was terrible at working with people.

    Fast forward to junior and senior year. I was taking tests up to the bell (and sometimes 10-15 minutes past it) because I get distracted easily by little noises people make after they've finished their tests and I can't think straight. I almost failed my Senior Project because had no people skills, and I couldn't secure a mentor (I got approved for "early bird" in May of my junior year and tried for 10 months with several people). Due to this, I almost failed 12th grade entirely. I'm lucky I had forgiving teachers who allowed me to present without getting a mentor, and I'm lucky that I graduated and got into college.

    My dad agreed that I "might have autistic tendencies" after he watched the Temple Grandin movie, but he still wouldn't listen when I told him I was trying as hard as I could and still failing.

    I'm now in college, and I took my evaluation to the disability office. They granted me accommodations (in specific, time-and-a-half in a quiet room in the testing center for tests, notetakers (which I'm not currently using since I audio record and type notes on my computer), and priority class scheduling). I believe if I had gotten the accommodations that were suggested when I was in HS, I would've done much better.

    So... that's my long story that really had nothing to do with D. I guess what I'm trying to say is that section 504 (and other, similar, laws) exists for a reason. If your daughter qualifies, then she may need accommodations. Without them, her learning environment is not the same as those without D/disabilities, and she may suffer for it.
     
  6. virgo39

    virgo39 Approved members

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    There's nothing wrong with a crutch if you need some help walking:).

    We actually do not currently have a 504 plan in place for our second-grader but intend to put one in place for next year.

    The reason we do not have one right now, however, is not because we think they are not appropriate. It's because the issues that she requires assistance with are currently addressed in her diabetes care plan.
     
  7. Darryl

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    We've never had one (3rd through 8th grade). It just hasn't seemed necessary. We meet with the teachers the first week of school and explain what she needs and give them glucose supplies, and that seems to work fine.
     

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