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Anyone know what an aide can/can't legally do (preferably someone who knows about NY laws)

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by missmakaliasmomma, May 2, 2014.

  1. missmakaliasmomma

    missmakaliasmomma Approved members

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    We're meeting some resistance from the school in regards to my daughter keeping her nurse for next year. Personally, as long as she has an aide, I don't really care if it's a nurse or not. I never did, I just wanted someone there who understood t1 and someone who could keep my daughter safe. To me, it's not so much the education but the experience in diabetes. Her nurse now is telling me an aide (hell, even an lpn) cannot administer insulin. As in, cannot bolus from a pump either. She said that an aide can't "interpret" bg numbers. As far as an lpn, she says that she would have to be in direct contact with the nurse in order to give medicine. I'm just not sure I believe it 100%

    If this is not true, I don't want the school thinking that an aide can't bolus her insulin and that she has to walk up to the nurse everytime she tests(you know, to "interpret" the bg reading) or bolus, or anything else for that matter.

    Anyone know the legalities, or where I can possibly find this info out?
     
  2. MamaC

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  3. misscaitp

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    http://www.health.ny.gov/publications/0944.pdf

    It seems as if non-medical personnel cannot administer insulin unless they are hyperglycemic (which can be termed as an emergency). Non-medical personnel can also administer glucagon. Check out pages 44, 69-74, and 89.

    Only RNs can administer insulin in non-emergencies (so normal range BGs). If the aide simply counts the carbs, and monitors and checks to make sure your daughter puts the numbers (BG and carbs) in correctly, I would assume you could work around it.

    If the aide is trained as a DTP--they are able to interpret numbers. Pulled straight from page 44:
    • "Overview of the child’s individual Emergency Care Plan (ECP) and referral to ECP to determine course of action for results of blood glucose monitoring, urine ketone testing, and treatment of hypo/hyperglycemia when the school nurse (RN) is not available..."
     
  4. missmakaliasmomma

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    What does being trained as a dtp entail? Just being trained by the rn? That's what it seems like... That would work
     
  5. misscaitp

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    From the guide, it seems like 1:1 training by the RN on the specific child with diabetes. Very individualized. (Page 44 provides more details on what a DTP can do and it seems to cover the majority of diabetes care.)
     

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