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Anyone in Sweden?

Discussion in 'Scandinavia' started by kelpie, Jan 24, 2008.

  1. kelpie

    kelpie Approved members

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    Considering the high rate of type 1 diabetics in Sweden I'm guessing (hoping) that some have found their way to this forum - in which case;
    Hejsan! :)
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2008
  2. AmberO

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    Hej!

    I'm in Finland, I don't think I've seen anyone else from Scandinavia here.

    Anyway I'm an American married to a Finn. Been over here almost 6 years now.

    Welcome to CWD!
     
  3. kelpie

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    Thanks! - I seem to remember reading that Finland has the highest # T1 diabetics (in proportion to pop) in the world... with Sweden in second place - and I remember when we were admitted to the emergency ward the nurse said that as soon as one new diabetic arrived they started preparing for more as they always came in groups! very odd... I'm Scottish, and a (nowadays) single mum - been here 16 yrs..
     
  4. AmberO

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    Yes that is what I was told when we moved here. Pretty scary considering how small these 2 countries are compared to others and then such a high incidence of T1. The nurse told me that one time in one month they had 60 new cases.


    Whereabouts do you live in Sverige? We live just outside Helsinki. We take the Silja Line over to Stockholm about 2 or 3 times a year. :)
     
  5. kelpie

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    I live in a small town (Hjo) by lake Vättern - pretty much central Sweden... but I've got family living in Stockholm and spent some time there myself - lovely city albeit a bit hectic if you've gotten used to life 'in the sticks'!
    :)
    Reading through many of the other threads makes me appreciate living here
    - no health insurance issues and no problem at all being fitted with a pump
    (though they insisted she had to cope untethered the first two years.. which suited her fine as she wasn't ready for it and hated the whole notion,
    now it's HER decision and she loves it).
    I've asked about cgm -but was told that it's not accurate enough to be approved for use here.. do they use them in Finland? I love the idea of being able to follow rates constantly and the # of test strips we get through it would probably save the state a fortune!
     
  6. AmberO

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    Yea we had the same here. They didn't put children on pumps younger then 12 so I pushed for it after reading about the untethered method here. Luckily it's worked out and her Endo has put younger ones on the pump using the method.

    She's still on it, he's asked us if we wanted to go full-time to the pump, but I will leave that up to Nikki.

    The CGMS we would be able to get for a 5 day trial to see her averages, but I think the nurse told me it's really only been approved for the adults here.

    Another funny thing is that they have never heard of the Omni-pod when I asked about it, so I gave them the info and I hope maybe one of these days it will be available over here... You would think with the amount of T1 here they would be up to date on all the latest technology!

    But I am so greatful for the KELA system here with regards to Diabetics. I can't even think going back to what I had to deal with in the states even having so called "insurance" through my work.

    Do they have a diabetic union over there too? We get a small monthly stipend as full time carers for Nikki. Not besides the free supplies and then we pay €5 for 3 months supply insulin.


    I love going to Stockholm although it is a very crowded city. They have a bit more variety of shopping then Finland and you can't beat the SF Bokhandeln in Gamla Stan! ;)
     
  7. kelpie

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    - The omni-pod is something I'd never heard of before... but I've seen it mentioned here and will check it out..
    Neither have I heard of a Diabetes union :confused: I'll have to check THAT out aswell!
    Our insulin supplies are free - and we get a small allowance for increased
    food costs. I sent away for a free 'Freestyle lite' bsm (we're using the older freestyle) and it arrived yesterday - I'm just hoping our nurse will issue us with the relevant test strips so we can use it.. bit of a shame that they don't use the same strips.

    Love Gamla stan - it and 'Söder' are my favourite parts of Stockholm..
     
  8. AmberO

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    Our nurse just gave us the newest version of the accu check compact. But she says there's an even newer version coming out that we'll be able to try in May. Don't know if its AC or another brand though.

    Do you go to a clinic or is like here that if you live in a certain area then you are assigned to a hospital that has the ped. d clinic in it?

    I'm still trying to get used to some of the ways they do things over here. Like for instance the dentist is arranged by the school! And a Dr comes to the school once a year to do vaccs and general health check with the school nurse. Otherwise though we rely completely on the diabetes clinic for everything else with her. They even got us the referral for the Asthma clinic for her instead of having to go through the health center.


    How do you like living in Sweden? Do you go home to Scotland to visit? It's so expensive for us to fly home, so every couple of years for all of us, but my parents take the kids every year for June and part of July.
     
  9. kelpie

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    Hi - Yes, we go to the assigned to the hospital's children's dept. and see the ped. D team on a fairly regular basis... this works well although i've come across conflicting advice given within the team of three medics we deal with - seems everybody's got their own ideas about D. As if things weren't confusing enough to start with! :)
     
  10. AmberO

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    We only see the Endo and our nurse. We see a nurse for her asthma care (luckily it seems to be seasonal induced right now) and then the dietician once a year.

    The dietician is a hard nosed lady but in a good way. Now that Nikki is older she spends most of the appt talking to Nikki and working with her then us. :D
     
  11. kelpie

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    "Hard nosed lady" huh? - sounds like our D nurse -she always makes me feel like I'm back at school and have forgotten to do my homework.. I'm OK with living in Sweden now - though it's taken a while and I still dream of moving 'home' sometime in the future..
    I'm lucky in that there are cheap flights to the UK so that keeps me sane (and stocked up in Haggis :))
    So your parents have the kids every summer? - I take it they are bi lingual then.. I speak english with my son, but my daughter insists on sticking to swedish (I live in hope) - and do you speak Finnish ? (perhaps Swedish?)
     
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2008
  12. AmberO

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    We moved over here when Quinn was 3 months old and Nikki was 5½. Now she is completely fluent in Finnish and in fact her teacher felt she was good enough to move to the native speakers class instead of the Finnish as secondary. :D

    Quinn we're still working on. He's more fluent in English than Finnish, but neither language are fluid. I think summers are really good for him to have an English only environment as he'll be attending the same English international school as Nikki in 2009. I would like to have him seen by a speech therapist, but there are no qualified English ST here anymore.. maybe I can get an outside eval in July when we go home for our visit.

    My husband is of the smaller % of Swedish speaking Finns. I think he prefers speaking Swedish then Finnish and most of our friends are Finno-Swedes (as they call them here)

    I took German in H.S and then an exchange program called GAPP, and then my dad was transferred to Grafenwöhr for 2 years, so with that and English, Swedish was super easy for me to pick up. I don't speak it much but reading and hearing it is almost no problem for me! Finnish is a whole nother kettle of fish for. I've heard it is the 2nd hardest language in the world to learn. I do understand it, can read it and speak it somewhat, but I get nervous and put off when a native doesn't understand me the first time. So I am not confidant in my speaking...

    However it's great as the kids at work forget all the time I understand them perfectly and always act so surprised when I call them on something not so nice that they have said. ;) (my MIL has learned a little that she can't talk about me in front of me in Finnish to my husband at least like she used to do all the time)

    wow that was long! Oh I have a long time friend who moved to Sverige has been there 10 years and says about 90% of the people of the town she's in speak Finnish, is it like that in your region?
     
  13. arbequina

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    Hej Amber and Kelpie!

    I really hope that you don't mind me jumping into your discussion, but we are seriously considering moving to Sweden in the very near future, so I've been following through with interest.

    We are currently living in Belgium and my husband is Swedish. I'm an American, but I went to school in England and university in Edinburgh, so we've all got something in common, I suppose. :)

    Before D, I was on an expat contract so it made financial sense to live in BE. Now, I can't work anymore (long story) and as expats, we simply don't have the family or friend support network to help us deal with everything, so that's why we are thinking of Sweden. And of course, the rate of T1 is so high, I am hoping that people/schools are more used to the taking care of T1 than they are here!

    The problem is that the health care that we get is excellent, very low cost, and all diabetic supplies are free, including the pump. The CGMS is also not available for us, since they are still doing trials with it. I am desperate to get one, though, and I've tried looking in neighbouring countries, but no one will give us one! :(

    I've heard a mixed review on Swedish healthcare and from an expat site, I heard that you have to pay for test strips yourself? Kelpie, can you provide any more details?

    Amber, do you live in that island between Finland and Sweden where they speak mostly Swedish? My husband's very good friend is from there and it seems lovely - I'd like to visit it sometime. I love Stockholm as well, but it is a bit too crowded for me, so I prefer Uppsala, where my husband is from.

    Sorry again for the intrusion, but I have to say that it is reassuring to read about both of your experiences that seem to be generally positive.

    Cheers,

    Arbequina
     
  14. AmberO

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    The island you are thinking of is Åland. I live in Espoo which is a city right next to Helsinki. I have a good friend who's parents have a summer house in Uppsala and have been invited to go visit, but haven't had a chance yet.

    We have the same as you, it looks like, everything is free including strips, no CGMS and only a €5 copay on 3 months insulin supply. I think we also pay a €20 copay for the endo visits every 3 months.

    Nice to see another expat on board!
     
  15. kelpie

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    Hi Arbequina!
    -I wouldn't worry about butting in - the thought had occured to me that we should've perhaps gone private having begun to slide OT.. but as we seemed to be the only ones here it perhaps didn't matter so much.:eek:
    Anyway,
    The healthcare situation here seems similar to the Belgian. My daughter's also got a Cozmo, but no cgm as they're not considered reliable enough yet. Test strips and everything else to do with her treatment (insulin, pump, endo visits etc. etc) is free - apart from the Glucagon kit (not sure why that has to be paid for, - but it's a small sum once every two years so hardly a problem) we also receive an allowance each month to cover extra diet costs and any time taken off work to care for her is paid by the state - (I think it's about 80% of loss of earnings) normally this ceases when the child is 12 but as it's Diabetes it's been extended to 16yrs.
    I honestly think you can relax regarding D healthcare - not least in a university town like Uppsala! :D
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2008
  16. OmgItsJohanna

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    Hi, i am american, born and still living here. Im only 13 and have had diabetes for about half a year, and my mom is swedish/finnish, and we speak some at home.
    So i read in some of your former posts that swedes and finns are in the lead for most cases of diabetes, and that really interested me. My mother's family is from the Lapland islands i believe, and do you guys know if there is a higher incidence of diabetes in certain parts of sweden? Like, in the more metropolitan areas such a Uppsula (spelling?), or stockholm, compared to the less busy areas, are there variances in the amount of cases?

    I have no idea if you would be able to help me with this, but it would really be appreciated, as I'm trying to form a hypothesis for a project i'm doing in my spare time on the genetic factors vs. enviromental, using historical statistics and such. Any help would be super appreciated!
     
  17. kelpie

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    Hi, - I'm sorry... but I can't say I've heard of there being a regional difference in the proportion of T1's - while at the same time I've read of a possible theory that lack of vit. D during early childhood could be one possible cause (of many! :) ) of developing T1. As you probably know during the winter here up north the sun hardly breaks the horizon - while during the summer it almost never sets (hence 'the land of the midnight sun') but even then the UV B rays (that help the body produce v D) aren't that strong.. or so I've heard anyway.
    I remember our endo commenting that people that move here from other 'less T1' countries become as likely statistically to develop it as any Swede - makes you wonder if it's something in the water!:eek:
     
  18. albasmom

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    Hi.
    We're from Denmark. We live in copenhagen. Nice to hear from someone closer to home. :)
    We're also considiring the cgms for our daugther but the nurses here are on strike right now so we hardly have any contact with our clinic right now. :( As soon as they start working again we're going to talk to them. I don't know if it's available here for small children but i sure hope so
     
  19. kelpie

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    Hej Albasmom!
    So the nurses are striking in Denmark too?
    Is it as hot in Köpenhamn as it is here I wonder..
    my daughter's had almost nothing but very high numbers these past few days and I'm tempted to blame the weather for it. Right now I'd give anything for some rain!
    I wish we could try a cgm - but our endo. says they aren't reliable enough yet..
     
  20. GAmom

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    OMGItsanotherJohanna, HI!
    I think your hypothesis is interesting! I've wondered about that too. My daughter is T1 and I wondered how her genes have played a part of this story. My father is from Holland and his brother is T1 (diagnosed at 45). My husband's dad was Norweigan (great grandmother was a Lapp). I have about 50 first cousins myself, yet none are T1. No one in my husband's family has T1.
    Goodluck w/ your project,
    another Johanna in US
     

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