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Anyone In Canadia Tried the I-Port Advance?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by coni1523, Apr 17, 2012.

  1. coni1523

    coni1523 Approved members

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    I was just wondering if anyone has tried the I-Port Advance yet? I was thinking about getting it and going off the pump for a pump break. Wanted to see if it was worth looking into.
    Thank you so much for your time.
     
  2. Deal

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    I had not heard of it before seeing your post. I see it as having all the disadvantages of using a pump without getting any of the advantages!
     
  3. emm142

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    Really? I see it as pretty advantageous.

    1) Not attached to tubing all the time.
    2) Not relying on the canula for long-acting insulin.
    3) Assuming 1 basal injection per day, 4 shots every 3 days rather than 12+ shots every three days.

    The needles don't really bother me with injections, but if that was what prompted me to pump (as it does for many people) then I'd be really interested in the I-Port.
     
  4. Deal

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    I was thinking along the lines of having something attached 24/7, the itchiness of the wound trying to heal around the cannula, scaring, allergic reactions to adhesives, and absorption questions.

    All that to avoid a few shots seems like a steep tradeoff. Shots can be irritating, but at least the irritation is contained to the few seconds you are taking them.

    I know if I was signing up for the negatives of having a port installed I would want to have computerized dispensing as a positive tradeoff.
     
  5. mmgirls

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    it is just like a pump site, just that you inject into it. Nothing is "installed", it is a pump site that a regular insulin syridge injects into.
     
  6. Deal

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    Reading your post makes it sound like you are objecting to something I said, yet it seems we agree 100%. Does the word "installed" conjure up negative visions. If I worded it "Inserted and attached" would that be better?

    I certainly agree with your wording. It's a pump site but without the pump.
     
  7. mmgirls

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    I guess I think of it as only something that can be benifical. We have been pumping since 18months, yet the idea of putting on a new site is hard for my dd. It does not take seconds. For allot of people like my dd it is the mere thought of going threw the skin, and if the I-port is that little thing that getts rid of of the tension and hesitation for 3 days, then as a parent I would try to get it for my child.

    I guess your post just sounded negative and I wanted to clarify what the device was for any others reading.
     
  8. miss_behave

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    I use the pump and I don't experience any of the problems listed above other than being attached 24/7 obviously, which really doesn't bother me. I personally wouldnt use an iPort if switching back to MDI as injections don't bother me, but I can see its usefullness in someone who hates multiple daily injections and cannot pump for whatever reason.
     
  9. danismom79

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    This actually sounds like you're saying your daughter would have just as hard a time with the i-port, since she doesn't tolerate site changes well.

    If my daughter were needle-phobic, like plenty of people are, I'd get this in a heartbeat. It's not always just a matter of the "irritation" of injections.
     
  10. mmgirls

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    Yes I beleive she would have the same issues with I-port, yet it would be far better than regular MDI if we could not pump for some reason. the previous poster Deal made it sound like I-port did not have benifits for someone coming from pumping only negatives. I was attempting to show that there are some very good things about it if one wanted to give it a try.
     
  11. sarahspins

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    I agree.. it took me a VERY long time after I was diagnosed to be able to give myself a shot without a great deal of fear/anxiety. Something like this would have helped me a lot - I did avoid eating (well, snacking) and taking shots before I was on a pump.

    Wearing an infusion set is typically quite comfortable.. I don't see why the i-Port would be different from that.
     
  12. Deal

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    My posts reflect my situation. My ds tried infusion sites (for a cgm) and hated it. It did irritate him constantly, and got ripped out once on the trampoline. He also absolutely hated the process of inserting the site. For these reasons we are not using a CGM or pump.

    He is on MDI and has no issue with shots. He is use to the small needles and they just don't bother him at all. Hopefully in time he will want to try the site again for the purposes of a CGM and/or pump.

    Obviously other kids have different experiences with both technologies and there is a place for both.

    I did not originally see any value in installing a site for MDI when having a break from a pump was the reason. I'm still not sure I totally get it but I didn't consider the negative experience that some kids have with individual shots nor the psychological boost of a change being as good as a rest. With those considered I understand.
     
  13. sarahspins

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    Which CGM did you try? If it was the minimed system, then that's no surprise that he hated it.. it's probably the most painful to insert and the least comfortable to wear. Infusion sets are completely different.
     
  14. danismom79

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    This is my understanding as well. We were discussing CGMS with the CDE the other day, and she was glad I was considering the Dex because the needle is smaller and less painful. And I know kids who are fine with regular pump sets but totally irritated by the CGM.
     
  15. Deal

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    It was the Medtronic CGMS we tried. I know that when we try again we will be sure to look at other options. We just went with what our office was test driving at the time.
     
  16. danismom79

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    Some people do need a break because of irritations or allergies, etc. But others want/need the break from having the pump and tubing to worry about and carry around. Sometimes in the summer I almost wish my daughter would take a break from the pod because we have a heck of a time keeping it on.
     
  17. miss_behave

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    A pump infusion set is completely different from a CGMS site. Definitely much more comfortable and less irritating. If you're interested in the benefits of pumping, I would try an infusion set with an inbuilt inserter before discounting it based on your CGMS experience.
     
  18. hawkeyegirl

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    Not to mention that a young child is very unlikely to recognize the benefits of a CGM. The benefits of pumping, on the other hand, are much more apparent to kids.
     
  19. Mimi

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    When/if the time comes that you are looking at CGM again the Enlite sensor should be available. We've never used anything but the Enlite but from all I've heard and seeing one at the endo office, it appears there is a big difference in the insertion process and comfort level.

    Just a thought for the future. :cwds:
     

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