- advertisement -

Anyone homeschool their High-Schooler?

Discussion in 'Parents Off Topic' started by Big Hair Momma, Dec 8, 2010.

  1. Big Hair Momma

    Big Hair Momma Approved members

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2007
    Messages:
    1,596
    My DD14 is really struggling at her high school. She is not seeing consistent success academically, emotionally or socially. The private, Christian HS closed 2 years ago and there isn't another option. I am looking at enrolling her in an education co-op for part of her studies and homeschooling her for the remainder of her classes. Any suggestions? Curriculum that you just love? Has anyone used Rosetta Stone for language? Any help or insight welcome. Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Lucky 868

    Lucky 868 Approved members

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2010
    Messages:
    169
    Hi,

    I homeschooled both my sons through high school. They are now a junior at a Cal State Univ. and a freshman at community college. Both are doing well and enjoying college.

    I used an online distance learning school that was WASC accredited. Accreditation is very important so they can get into college without a problem. If you want to discuss this in more detail, feel free to PM me and we can chat. Let me know what state you are in, too, as the laws vary by state.

    Best of luck,
    Cyndy
    Mom of N, 17, dx in April (great way to end high school)
     
  3. hrtmom3

    hrtmom3 Approved members

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2007
    Messages:
    1,128
    I have homeschooled Tim since 4th grade. He will graduate this year.
    He uses Rosetta Stone for Japanese. It's a great program.
    We use BJU for Language (Writing and Grammar). Have tried others, but prefer BJU. We are also using 12th grade ABEKA along with the BJU for some extra, but really not liking it that much. Don't like BJU for History. For History, Geography, and Government we have used ABEKA, Alpha and Omega, and Around the World in 180 Days and liked all three.
    For Science we have used Apologia and Abeka. Apologia is good hands on, but he prefers the Abeka for Science and does better with it.
    For Math, we have used Saxon only. The last few years for Math, we have also used the D.I.V.E. computer program which goes along with the Saxon book. It takes the stress out of me having to completely understand every little thing.
    Good luck with whatever you decide.
     
  4. nanhsot

    nanhsot Approved members

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2010
    Messages:
    2,626
    Yup, homeschooling my 16 year old as we speak! We use a co-op that meets once per week and he does his work at home in those classes, then I teach the remainder. I'll assume that Christian curriculum is OK with you since you had her in a Christian HS. We use: Apologia science, Notgrass History, Total Language Plus, IEW for writing, Math U See for math. Spelling is mixed in with his English classes and focuses on root words for SATprep/vocabulary. Those are the basics. We have used Rosetta Stone for spanish but he's not thrilled with it, I think it's good if used correctly but he's not very motivated so I'm considering a switch right now.


    Supplements we use: Latina Christiana, keyboarding, SAT prep. There are more but those are the basics. We mix in elective based stuff regularly (sports, 4H, community service, technology, Art, etc).

    Outside the home he takes Chemistry, Study Skills, and English (includes grammar/usage, writing, vocab, spelling, SAT prep). I teach the rest.

    We've homeschooled for 9 years and wouldn't have it any other way. I have a 12 year old/Jr. High level student as well.
     
  5. Christopher

    Christopher Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2007
    Messages:
    6,771
    Have you been able to determine the underlying cause of her lack of success on so many levels? Simply removing her from school may not solve her issues and may even make them worse. In order to determine the best way to help her, I would think that you would first need to determine what the root cause is. Just my two cents.
     
  6. Lisa P.

    Lisa P. Approved members

    Joined:
    May 19, 2008
    Messages:
    5,380
    It might be helpful for you to spend a day or two with some home schooling families if you haven't already. There are as many misconceptions about home schooling as there are about Type 1 diabetes! :D Most of the parents who home school due to "issues" have clearly identified the root of the problem and the solution they have found is home schooling.

    OT, we're not doing high school yet, but if you haven't seen the Life of Fred series, you might want to check it out. Math series that will take you about two years into college level, really different approach, lots swear by it.

    Good luck! Have fun!
     
  7. nanhsot

    nanhsot Approved members

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2010
    Messages:
    2,626
    Or, on the other hand, it may show her daughter that her parents value her as a person, want the best for her, won't leave her in a bad situation, and family is the rock she can stand on. It may show her that education is highly valued, and that SHE is highly valued. I don't know all the causes of problems either, but I will say that it irks me that every time someone simply asks for information about homeschooling that that person is confronted with "copping out" and not solving the issue.

    I probably shouldn't hit "submit" but I am anyway. I don't recall reading her asking for help in adjusting her daughter to school. She asked if there was anyone here who homeschooled a high schooler (which is a HUGE leap, and she's right to look for support) and what curricula they use.

    Homeschooling is a viable, dynamic, academically strong option. School is not a necessary rite of passage into adulthood, it is simply one of many. I would NEVER question why a person would put their kid in school. I respect all educational options.

    I wish homeschoolers were given the same consideration.
     
  8. hrtmom3

    hrtmom3 Approved members

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2007
    Messages:
    1,128
    Ditto, what Nancy said!
     
  9. Christopher

    Christopher Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2007
    Messages:
    6,771
    Wow, uhm, I was simply trying to find out if the OP had looked at the root cause of her daughter's problem. It was not clear from her original post that she had. Not sure why you are so touchy about it. I was just trying to help.
     
  10. Christopher

    Christopher Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2007
    Messages:
    6,771
    Double wow. Sorry if I irked you, but I never said that the OP was copping out and not solving the issue. Not even close. Again, I was simply asking a basic question. Not sure why I am getting jumped on and words put into my mouth. Sheesh.

    To the OP, I am sorry if my post caused this thread to get derailed. I will refrain from posting to it further. Good luck with your daughter, whatever road you choose.
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2010
  11. nanhsot

    nanhsot Approved members

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2010
    Messages:
    2,626
    I don't recall who was involved before, but a similar issue came up very recently, so it set me off. It just seems like homeschooling is viewed as not facing a problem, instead of being a viable solution to a problem.

    I suppose you need to realize that those of us traveling this alternative world of schooling often have to defend our choice, as if we were doing something harmful to our children by not enrolling them in regular school.

    This was the second similar reply in a very short time that basically questioned homeschooling as a viable option for a kid who wasn't thriving in school (I believe the other one was an anxious child with stomach issues). It is just a bit wearisome to always have homeschooling portrayed as not fixing the problem, which is what the other reply and quite frankly yours implied.
     
  12. sammysmom

    sammysmom Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2005
    Messages:
    1,635
    While I have absolutely no issue with homeschooling I also thought just about the same thing as Christopher. The OP mentioned academic problems. The first thing that comes to mind is "why is she having academic issues". Just simply homeschooling will not fix that. Finding the root cause and then adjusting the teaching style while either at school or homeschool would then solve the problem. Socially, find out the cause and then work with that. Is the parent wanting the child to mature or progress socially? Well home or traditional school either way you need to find out the reasons why something is happening. I did not find Christophers suggestions a bash against homeschoolers at all. I also read (becuase it is all the op wrote, no more details were available) the op as "my child is struggling in traditional, will home school make it all better?" no more or no less.
     
  13. nanhsot

    nanhsot Approved members

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2010
    Messages:
    2,626
    I do understand your viewpoint and agree with it. We really can't know what the OP has done to work through these issues and perhaps homeschooling won't help.

    What I want to raise awareness of is how one sided this type of argument is. There are posts on here ALL the time ranting about school issues, the nurses this, the teachers that, school issues are quite common. The homeschoolers NEVER come on and say "well, you should not have them in school". Homeschoolers, as a rule, have great respect for all educational options and it really is unheard of (or at least unusual) for homeschoolers IRL or online to question other's educational choices.

    Contrast that to what we live with daily. Ever been grocery shopping with your kids and have the checkout lady accost you about why your kids aren't in school and how do you do standardized testing and does the state check on what they are learning? I have! Ever have a college professor tell you that your children need to go to school because how else will they learn to deal with bullies? Etc, etc, I imagine most homeschoolers here have a similar story.

    I would never never question your decision to put your children in school. Why do others feel it's OK to question my decision not to? No, not everyone does that, but even in this simple example posting, homeschooling is brought to question as not dealing with the problem. OK, so it doesn't solve the problem. No harm no foul. You can always go back to school. Or you just might find that your family is more peaceful homeschooling, or that your daughter discovered a previously unexplored talent for sculpture. Or whatever.

    Bottom line is that someone wanting to homeschool is constantly questioned. If this same person came and said that their child was not thriving in school, there would have been lots of discussion on how to help, and probably some homeschoolers would have gently suggested school at home as an option...but if it were apparent that the child were staying in school they would NOT state openly that keeping them in school might make things worse, which is what was said about homeschooling.

    I hope I'm making sense but I doubt it, long day! Bottom line is that homeschoolers find themselves criticized frequently, for no real reason except that folks don't really have a comfort level with schooling at home. All I can say is that my kids are getting an excellent education, are ridiculously well socialized, and are happy and thriving at home. Same can be said for many kids in school. What matters if finding the right fit for each child, and good for the OP for looking outside the box to solve the problem, whatever the problem is.
    I will also apologize to the original poster for derailing the conversation. I wish her peace in her decision, it's not one taken lightly.
     
  14. KRenee

    KRenee Approved members

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2008
    Messages:
    322
    I love IEW for all aspects of writing www.excellenceinwriting.com

    and I use and can recommend:
    Chalkdust for math www.chalckdust.com
    DVD lectures from The Teaching Company www.teach12.com (wait for a sale)
    Analytical Grammar www.analyticalgrammar.com

    The biggest supplier of all kinds of curriculum is www.RainbowResource.com

    I have not used Rosetta Stone. I have heard it is good but you need to add grammar instruction.

    My 14 yo is looking at early entrance to the local jr. college and will take a lot of classes there which will qualify for both high school and college credit.

    Good luck to you.
     
  15. hawkeyegirl

    hawkeyegirl Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2007
    Messages:
    13,157
    I agree with you that homeschooling can get a bad rap, and I'm sure you take your fair share of crap over it. Personally, the only time it gets the hairy eyeball from me is when I see a child being homeschooled by someone who appears to have basic skills at about a 2nd grade level. (That is not a reference to you, the OP, or anyone else in this thread, for the record.) For the kids' benefit, I wish there was more oversight in this regard, but I don't see that happening.

    I have nothing but the utmost respect for people who homeschool well. It is certainly beyond my capabilities.
     
  16. nanhsot

    nanhsot Approved members

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2010
    Messages:
    2,626
    I've been doing this a very long time, and have met every kind of homeschooler under the sun, including a few who I considered neglectful parents. What I can say about that is the ones who are doing a BAD job do not last, it is simply too much work. Having your kids around all day can be a lot of work even if you are not doing school! The ones who don't do a good job rarely last, and the ones who are neglectful are typically also breaking child protection laws of other sorts. There are already plenty of laws on record that cover that.

    Many days it is beyond my capabilities as well, that's sometimes the fun of it, history is a BLAST the second time around, I just learn with them!
     
  17. Christopher

    Christopher Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2007
    Messages:
    6,771
    Just one more thing: There was no argument here until your post. In my personal opinion, you are doing yourself and all homeschooler's a disservice by overreacting and taking out all this pent up frustration on "innocent" people like me who are only trying to understand the OP's situation.

    That said, I am sorry you have to deal with all those frustrating comments from people.
     
  18. MissEmi

    MissEmi Approved members

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2008
    Messages:
    1,899
    I graduated from homeschool; I used A.C.E. (Accelerated Christian Education) and Rosetta Stone's French program. I loved both. I feel like I have retained a lot by going through A.C.E. and I learned a lot of concepts that aren't taught in public schools, which helped me with College Algebra and my Fundamentals of Mathematics (for Elem. teachers) course.
     
  19. hawkeyegirl

    hawkeyegirl Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2007
    Messages:
    13,157
    Weeeellllll, I see plenty of people on the Interwebz post that they've been homeschooling their kids for umpteen-odd years, and they can barely string two words together. I think there's a vast area between truly neglectful and competent, and I'd want my child's teacher to be much closer to competent than some of what I've seen. Really, if capital letters, simple punctuation, and their/they're/there are more than you can handle, I'm not sure you have much business being your child's primary educator, but that's not my call to make.

    And when I say homeschooling is beyond my capabilities, I mean it's beyond my capabilities to spend that much time with my kids. There's a reason I'm a working mom, and it's not because I love pantyhose so much. ;) I'd probably end up eating them if I homeschooled. :p
     
  20. Big Hair Momma

    Big Hair Momma Approved members

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2007
    Messages:
    1,596
    Hey Chris, I didn't take offense at all. We have talked to our dd about why the lack of success. And, it's not as those there is "no success", it's just not consistent. We have determined that this is the best course of action for all involved. She's excited to be out to the "pressure cooker" of high school and we're excited to allow her to be consistently successful in her studies.

    I'm glad you asked the question. I think it's important to ensure that everything has been explored before we make such a big change in how we educate our children. It certainly makes sense to cover all the bases before moving forward.



    Thanks to everyone for the suggestions on curriculum. We are still trying to figure out what this will look like for our family.

    I'm very excited to hear what others have to say. Thanks again.
     

Share This Page

- advertisement -

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice