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Anyone been to BSA Camp Philmont?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Rick_L, Feb 4, 2014.

  1. Rick_L

    Rick_L Approved members

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    My son is going to Philmont this summer. Just wondering if anyone has some tips for us. He is pumping but his endo wants him to use insulin pens while hiking. I have read where some just carry their insulin in a Frio pack. If he did this he could continue on the pump. He has been doing trial hikes and has figured out a good basal rate, so I hate to switch him up at camp!
     
  2. Megnyc

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    What is the specific concern with the pump? Is it the heat? I have never been to boy scout camp but I have been extremely active in hot environments such as the Middle East and several African countries (temps up to the 120s). I found that keeping actual insulin vials in frio packs works great. In general, if I am in an area in which the temps are consistently over 100 degrees F I will change out the reservoir in my pump every 24-48 hours using the insulin that has been kept in the frio packs. I personally would be concerned about having a long acting dose of basal working in case the exercise pushes blood sugar extremely low. I think being able to rapidly lower basal during intense exercise is a big advantage of the pump.
     
  3. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    The last place where I'd be wanting to switch to a different method of insulin delivery would be camp or travel. What reason does the endo give for this request?
     
  4. Amy C.

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    My son went to Philmont, but used his pump on the 10 day hike. He carried the insulin in Frio packs. We didn't want to change the method of delivering insulin for the hike, in fact the health form at the time said you had to be using the same method for treating diabetes for 6 months to go on the hike.
     
  5. sarahspins

    sarahspins Approved members

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    Ditto this. I spent 3 weeks on the road touring the SW with my kids two summers ago - we camped the whole time, and did plenty of day hiking and outdoorsy stuff, and I wore my pump without incident (I actually left on that trip with my first and only site infection ever and a freshly filled RX for antibiotics, knowing I'd stop to get it checked out if it didn't improve, but it got better fairly quickly). I would carry some form of long-acting insulin just in case it's needed (pump failure, use up all of your extra sites, etc), but I would not recommend suddenly switching from the pump just for a "what if" situation. Have a good back-up plan and be ready to use it, but otherwise continue on as normal.

    And I would also caution that while doing short day hikes now is a great idea for practice, and for building up endurance, hiking all day long (and for days in a row) is just different, and doing it in 100˚ temperatures makes it MUCH different. I would suggest changing his goal #'s to be about 20% higher and also running basals about 20% lower than whatever he's been relying on for his current hikes - it's much easier (and IMO safer) to correct moderate highs than it is to treat a low in the field, not the mention the residual effect of having low glycogen reserves following a low (even when glucagon is not given) will make things more difficult to manage on following days. That, and lets face it, running higher over that time isn't the end of the world - and note I said "higher", not "high" :) While I was out and about with the kids, I was absolutely fine seeing #'s in the 120-140 range and often wouldn't correct until I was over 160 (though I used those numbers knowing that on days I hiked a lot, my #'s naturally drop hours later), while at home I'm much happier with 90-100 and would always correct down to that. I also felt like I never stopped snacking on things, most of which I didn't bolus for. Hydration is also critical... I would carry more water than is suggested, and have a back-up plan like a steripen (they are small) to purify water out in the field if it's necessary.
     
  6. Amy C.

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    Unless his hike is in August, it is too late to change insulin delivery methods. Scouts are smart on this -- they have learned from experienced that a Type 1 should not start a new regime right before camp.
     
  7. SidC

    SidC New Member

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    I'm Base Camp Manager at Philmont & use an insulin pump. I would advise against your som changing from it. Feel free to contact me directly if you would like to discuss this and the support Philmont can provide to people dependent on insulin.
     
  8. Rick_L

    Rick_L Approved members

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    I didn't feel comfortable changing him either. The doctors concern was the storage of insulin. If everyone has had great results with Frio packs, then we will stick with that. He has been fine on other trips with this method. How many vials of insulin should we pack for the trip? Is 2 enough or play it safe and send 3??
     
  9. sugarmonkey

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    This says it all perfectly. When we did a full day hike a couple of years ago, that was steep uphill until the last 10 minutes, I reduced the basal by quite a lot (I think about 50%, but can't remember) and DS still ate over 100g carbs uncovered and stayed in range the entire time. The highest he got to was 6 something (100-120). I haven't used frios, but I've read a lot of success stories with them on this site.
     

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