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Any sourdough bakers/scale users, need input.

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by nanhsot, Jul 27, 2010.

  1. nanhsot

    nanhsot Approved members

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    I finally got a Salter scale, should be here any day, so excited. Got the list (thank you!) and noticed that sourdough bread does not appear to be in there. I bake my own sourdough from an ongoing starter I feed and keep year round.

    I can't imagine how to input it as a recipe, given that the main ingredient is the starter, and it's a mix of ????stuff???? that I can't define! It's been brewing in my fridge for a long while, and it's a mix of natural yeast, flour, water. Other than that, the actual bread has only flour and salt, so those ingredients are easy.

    Can anyone help me? Is there a similar bread we can just use to weight and count? I think density is the difference in sourdough, as far as carb counting, so if we just use white bread as a similar, would that work or is that nowhere close?

    The whole scale thing still confuses me so maybe it will make more sense when I'm playing around with it.

    Can any of you scale users help me figure out sourdough, thanks.
     
  2. quiltinmom

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    When I don't know the exact count of a food, I find something similar and use that to help me estimate. Like you did with the white bread. How you have been counting it already (assuming your CWD has eaten sourdough bread in the past?), if that's been working for you, I'd just keep counting it the same way. I don't have a scale, but have been thinking hard about getting one. :) So this may be a little bit of "blind leading the blind." If I say something stupid, just ignore me. :)

    I recently made a bunch of bread at home and counted it similar to the store bought bread we usually eat. We get different varieties of the same brand of bread, an most of them are very similar in carb count (around 20, give or take 1-2 carbs), and the density of that bread is similar to what I made. So far I haven't noticed any problems. The sour part is just fermented yeast.

    I did a search recently about the different types of yeast, and sourdough start (sponge) was included in the list. Sorry I don't have link for you. If you can figure out what proportions of which ingredients it has, you can estimate based on that. If 1 cup flour and 1 cup water mixes to measure 1 1/2 cups, you know that 3/4 of that mixture contains the carbs of 1/2 cup of flour. Then you need to figure out how much the yeast makes the volume grow...I see how that could be tricky. I would take the amt of flour you think is in the starter, and count the other things you add, and go from there.

    Have you done a search on calorieking.com or another nutrition website? You might be able to find some help there.

    Good luck. :) Carb counting home made food can be a hassle sometimes! A very, very delicious hassle!
     
  3. nanhsot

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    Well, we've just eyeballed it so far, calling a large slice 22 carbs and it does seem to work, generally.

    I do see your logic in the fermenting process and will test that, I take 1/2 cup of starter (which is very thick, so I'm assuming not a lot of water??), mix in 3 cups water/flour and it grows immensely overnight, topping the big bowl, but I can easily measure it out and figure out general math on it. My biggest challenge as a bread baker is that I NEVER measure, I make my dough by feel, not by cup, but for one batch I can measure, surely!

    I've been told that sourdough causes spikes in some people, but we've not noticed that.
     
  4. blbrocky

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  5. 22jules

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    For sourdough bread that we eat from restaurants we use a carb factor of .47 and it works really well. Take the weight in grams of the piece of bread beieng eaten and multiply by .47 to give you the carb count of the bread!
     
  6. mom2ejca

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    I bake all of our bread, and I've weighed out a few different recipes and it usually works out to anywhere between .45-.53. I've never tried a sourdough bread, but expect it would be similar. Afterall, the proportion of liquid to dry ingredients is going to be fairly consistent for any kind of dough. We do shave off a few carbs per slice if it's a bread made with lots of nuts/seeds, cheese or something like a focaccia drizzled with oil, and topped with cheese or veggies.

    We've settled on .5 as a standard and I rarely weigh it out anymore. Plus, it's easy math for dd to throw a slice on the scale and divide it in half.
     
  7. simom

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    We also use 0.5 for most breads, with good results. We often buy the 'artisan' bread from the grocery store, including the sour dough, and it seems to work for that.
     
  8. nanhsot

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    :p
    This is really great to know, just before diagnosis I had started to play aorund with the artisan bread that you just leave in your fridge and pinch off a handful (artisan bread in 5 minutes or something similar). It was YUM but I've been afraid of it since D, now with a scale on the way I'm practically giddy to get my hands back into dough! I'll try the .5 and see how it goes, thanks.

    I'm still not exactly sure how the scale works and look forward to figuring it all out, but what I'm reading is that you take the weight in grams x carb factor if you know it, and .5 is a good starting point for homemade breads, yes? I hope it's that easy! Doesn't take much to get me excited, does it???
     

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