- advertisement -

And this is why you want to have a 504...

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Beach bum, Sep 18, 2015.

  1. Beach bum

    Beach bum Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2005
    Messages:
    11,315
    This is the first time in 9 years that we've ever had to tell the school to go back and refer to the 504. The girls are set to do a hike today at school. I asked casually if anyone going is trained in glucagon. The nurse (who is wonderful) said she would train a staff member. Well, guess what? No one wanted that responsibility. Now, personally, I know they would be perfectly fine doing this hike with plans put in place (temp basal), but the school did not want the liability. So, I get a call from the dean who offered for the girls to ride to the top "due to their medical condition." Ummm. NO WAY. I nicely said that they were not to be singled out and that they successfully completed the same exact hike in 4th grade, no problems. In fact, it wasn't diabetes that was an issue on that hike, some other kid had an issue. So he explained teachers didn't feel comfortable (translate HE) having them hike. I suggested he go and read the girls 504, as it states if there is no one trained to administer and the nurse cannot go (only 1) a trained person would be hired. Guess what? I got a call, a sub is going. Now, I could have easily said "we don't need anyone to go" but I needed to take a stand and show them that administration of glucagon is very important. I did ask about epipen. Guess what? Teachers are trained in that. Seems the nurse explained that, but when teachers saw Big Red they all freaked.

    So my message is, if you feel that you have a great relationship with the school and you don't feel you need a 504, I'd strongly reconsider. We have a great relationship with school, we had a problem and all it took was me to say "look at this section of their 504."
    It's nice to have it spelled out so that if a problem arises, you have everything already spelled out. You don't need to scramble after the fact to put one in place.
     
  2. Lakeman

    Lakeman Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 10, 2010
    Messages:
    956
    excellent points and while it is contrary to my nature to make a stand like that sometimes it just needs to be done.
     
  3. mamattorney

    mamattorney Approved members

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2013
    Messages:
    1,076
    I agree. I think I feel reluctant to push on things like that because I know that I rarely carry glucagon with my myself, so it is actually holding the school to a higher standard than I hold myself (maybe I shouldn't admit that the glucagon generally stays at home).
     
  4. Christopher

    Christopher Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2007
    Messages:
    6,771
    Good post and I would have done exactly the same thing. It would have bothered me to hear them say they didn't want the "liability". Guess what? While our children are in your care during the school day, it IS your responsibility to be "liable" for them. Another important point in this post is that you clearly have a good relationship with the school (at least the nurse) and the way you handled this preserved that relationship, while still advocating for your child. Nice job.
     
  5. Beach bum

    Beach bum Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2005
    Messages:
    11,315
    Well, I beat you on this. I carry a glucagon...an expired one:eek: It's so easy to forget about them. All of them seemed to expire at once. Waiting on the new ones to be shipped.
     
  6. Beach bum

    Beach bum Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2005
    Messages:
    11,315
    The other issue is that I don't want them to think that because other kids/parents at the school who have D don't care if someone is trained, I don't either. I do care. I don't care who it is, I just want someone to step in in an emergency. They all know epi-pen, glucagon is no different. It's just that damn needle looks so scary!
     
  7. Christopher

    Christopher Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2007
    Messages:
    6,771
    I think the only time I have ever carried glucagon is when we have gone on vacation. Other than that it sits on the shelf at home.
     
  8. Christopher

    Christopher Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2007
    Messages:
    6,771
    I think some could argue that glucagon is different from an epipen in that you have to do several steps to prepare the glucagon. But I still agree with all your points. :D
     
  9. jenm999

    jenm999 Approved members

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2014
    Messages:
    855
    Same here but my approach to d-care when my son is with me is SO MUCH more nuanced. I can see a 90 with a slight down arrow and do a quick calculation in my head of approx IOB and remember what he had for breakfast and how well he slept and decide to give a tab, for instance. The school waits for 80 and the dexcom to alert.

    I hope we have a stable auto-injector glucagon soon. I know there are a few companies working on it.

    Editing to add, Way to go, Beach bum!
     
  10. susanlindstrom16

    susanlindstrom16 Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 29, 2012
    Messages:
    371
    Glad it worked out, and thanks for the reminder that I need to set up a 504 in addition to the management plan we have. We had one at her old school but once we transferred we focused on the day to day care which has been great, so I haven't prioritized the 504. Need to get on that!

    I kind of hate when they some people frame d-care and our kids as a "liability." I guess i understand people's hesitation although if it were me I'd want to be trained in whatever action I could take while the kid was with me. Is there something that could happen if glucagon was given when not necessary? Is it possible to get too much?
     
  11. mamaberkhie

    mamaberkhie Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2014
    Messages:
    36
    Good for you! I think you handled it nicely.

    Is that so? That would be awesome. I've realized that that red box scares the sense out of people...and I mean just them knowing its in the house as part of the diabetes emergency plan.
     
  12. Christopher

    Christopher Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2007
    Messages:
    6,771
    Nope!

    .
     
  13. Wren

    Wren Approved members

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2013
    Messages:
    57
    Just a reminder that even private schools who take any federal money (e.g. Title 1, Title 2, USDA) must follow section 504. And the Americans with Disabilities Acts covers nearly everyone (e.g. Kindercare, after school programs, camps, etc.).

    Our state disability rights office represented our kid when a large science museum-run overnight camp for school kids (in our case, private school kids) said their policy was to "see if any of their counselors would be willing to do epipens and glucagon" and "all kids with diabetes must have a parent attend"). They changed their tune pretty quick.
     
  14. jenm999

    jenm999 Approved members

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2014
    Messages:
    855
    I don't know current status honestly but here's a 2014 summary of projects in progress: http://www.healthline.com/diabetesmine/next-gen-emergency-glucagon It could be a real moneymaker.
     
  15. Beach bum

    Beach bum Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2005
    Messages:
    11,315
    Yes, but the only thing that would happen is vomiting. So, you want to make sure once you give it to the person, you put them on their side. But, even giving to much would not injure the person.
     
  16. Beach bum

    Beach bum Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2005
    Messages:
    11,315
    Well, they survived. One was mildly low coming on the way down. The other had a stubborn low even after eating so decided to drive back down and suspended pump for a while. All in all, the day was successful.
     
  17. Lisa - Aidan's mom

    Lisa - Aidan's mom Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2011
    Messages:
    405
    Good for you and glad to read they had a good time and handled their lows well.
     
  18. rgcainmd

    rgcainmd Approved members

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2014
    Messages:
    1,378
    I can't stress how important it is to have a very thorough 504 that takes into consideration any practical detail you can think of regarding your child's "day in the life" at school. We had absolutely no difficulties at my daughter's middle school until a new principal and school nurse came on board. With this new "crew" it seems that everything needs to be spelled out in black and white and worded in a way to avoid any possible ambiguity. (And, no, my daughter's 504 is not excessively long or overly inclusive.) I have received several phone calls from school personnel and have needed to define in excruciating detail several points in my daughter's 504. It's been exhausting (and the school year has only just begun)...
     
  19. Mo1

    Mo1 Approved members

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2014
    Messages:
    67
    Holding the school accountable benefits your child(ren) and those that come after. I always carry Glucagon and my daughter carries it in her bag while in school. I don't ever want to wish I had it. Way to go!
     
  20. Theo's dad Joe

    Theo's dad Joe Approved members

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2015
    Messages:
    802
    A few things I did include.

    I made sure to include that he was not to be separated from his lunch box between the time he received his shot and the time he started eating lunch, in case there were to be a fire drill or lock down drill started in the 10 minutes between his shot and the time he would get in the cafeteria.

    I also required that rescue carbs be in all specials rooms, where the teachers, subs, and he all knew where they were located in case there were a real lockdown. Hope it doesn't happen, but it has happened in schools.

    (I do not make him carry his own rescue carbs to each room and his phone is in a location where it can pick up his receiver except for one 30 minute period (4 days a week) and one 45 minute period (2 days a week).

    I also had to explain why if he got a low alarm at lunch he was to not stop eating before going to the office. Also had to explain why he shouldn't get sent to the office 10 extra minutes early for his shot if he happened to be free at that point.

    They have to send a nurse on field trips or a clerk, trained with glucagon. I will go myself anyway. Last time I went I forgot to bring a needle. I felt horrible.

    I have a chart showing carbs for lows based on the number, and also he gets a few extra pretzels on his way to lunch if he is under 90 so he doesn't set of his alarm while he's finishing eating.
     
    Last edited: Sep 20, 2015

Share This Page

- advertisement -

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice