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an irking conversation from today....

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by chkpea, Jan 26, 2011.

  1. chkpea

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    hope I am not known on here as the one who complains/vents a lot but lately that's what I have done. I am a pretty positive person ,this is just my safe place to do my complaining. Anyhow, to get to the point, I was at the health food store today getting some vitamins, and I mentioned that my 7 year old is a little "off" lately - mood swings, teary, etc. She says well perhaps it is blood sugar related. I said I know all about it because of my 5 year old has d. Then she says her husband was dx'd at 18 with type 1. So we talk a bit more and she says he has been on 2 shots a day since dx. Has not adjusted his insulin :confused: has not been to a dr. in 13 years :confused: had one low of 1.6 once because she changed his peanut butter to an all natural one....I left there going OMG. She says he has GREAT control, blah blah blah. I just was mad 1. I didn't think she really seemed to get it even though she is married to someone with it, 2. I know how bloody hard all of us work to get good numbers and there is some guy out there walking about getting two shots a day for probably 18 years.

    Then I look at the other side and if all of that is true and this guy is complication free and we are using the most recent technology then our son should be doing great down the road as well.

    Not sure if this post makes sense but it just really irked me how "oh ya it's no big deal" way she talked about it. It makes me almost not want to go back in to that store.
     
  2. Pauji5

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    I don't blame you... it would irk me too. and people that say things like that really don't understand d.
     
  3. frizzyrazzy

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    a lot of adults do great with 2 shots a day and do great with a strict carb limit at each meal - their insulin amount is based on very set values of food. There is nothing wrong with that, if that is the way a person is comfortable handling their diabetes. As for being complication free - that's great too - but many of the complications of diabetes are hidden and he probably wouldn't have any idea if he has them if he hasn't seen a dr in 13 years (I'm thinking cholesterol issues and retina issues)

    And..added to that - adults are NOT kids. They don't have whacky growth hormones surging through their bodies and they don't have toddler emotions or recess or 'happy snack' at school.

    I would work on saying something like "wow, that's great for you husband! Little kids with diabetes *roll your eyes and smile* totally different beast"
     
  4. Lisa P.

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    I think I'd have mixed feelings. Sure, I confess, I'd wanna smack her. :p But it also is nice to think that if Selah wants to, when she's an adult, she might be able to find a way to get to that place, too.

    I think even as an adult, that's rare. And I suspect many who think they are getting by like the guy described really aren't. If you don't see a doctor, you don't get an A1C, you may be running at 250 all the time and not feel it because you're used to it. But if someone out there can do that, that's a good thing, not a bad one.

    But, yeah, the smacking thing too.:)
     
  5. C6H12O6

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    Well I guess they are rich because if he does not have a prescription for his strips there is no way to get any drug plan to pay for it. Sounds like BS to me because they would have to be paying for everything out of pocket just because he cannot be bothered to go to a doctor

    Even if it is only say 3000.00 a year who would not rather put that money toward something else
     
  6. NomadIvy

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    I do know someone here (adult) who is on Lantus and Novolog. I know he shoots up before meals and takes his lantus religiously at night. But I never hear that he checks his blood sugars. I thought I'd get support from his wife who's my friend when K was diagnosed but for her it was a "it's no big deal" kind of thing. The only way we influenced them was he finally started wearing a medical alert jewelry because my friend was scared that if he passed out nobody would know what to do whereas in Sweden, where they're from, people would probably know.
    Weird. Oh? And his A1Cs I believe are okay. He doesn't see an endo. He sees the same GP we all go to here.
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2011
  7. MHoskins2179

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    Many don't manage as the more active members of the Diabetes Community do, especially those plugged in online. They may have few Lows for the simple fact they are running High all the time, and are used to it and feel fine. The above point about "hidden" complications is well made. It may be tough to hear and impossible to rationalize to those Parents of CWD and those PWD who are so diligent, but it's their choice. A bigger message in all of this is that: No guarantees exist. You could have the best D-management, but still struggle and still run into complications at any time; while those D-Slackers out there may just not encounter the same struggles or complications despite their apathy. It's not fair, but it's the way it is. Do your best and know that it reduces the chances of future problems, and know that in the end you did your best and are teaching your CWD how to be a successful PWD.
     
  8. PatriciaMidwest

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    That is frustrating...just when you think you are going to connect with someone you find out they are playing a totally different sport. We work so hard trying to keep things in balance, and there is constantly a new battle to fight (sites, hormones, forgetfulness, apathy, carb guessing, etc etc) . It is so incredibly hard and frustrating!
     
  9. funnygrl

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    I don't know if it's because I was diagnosed later in life (19) or just the simple fact that I'm an adult, but I do feel my control is much easier than most people's here. Not to say I don't work hard at it- I pump, bolus for every bite, test 6-8x/day, and try to religiously follow the "rule of 15s" for lows. However, I do feel like I'm rewarded for my efforts with decent control and manageable swings, unlike many members here who put forth double or more of my effort.
     
  10. deafmack

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    While I agree that it may be easier for adults especially if they are past the stage of raging hormones, I don't see how this person can know if her husband has good control if he has not been to the doctor in umpteen years. Complications can stay hidden for many years as they are becoming worse.
    As to the two shots a day, the person has to be on a mixed insulin regimen and that is fine for that person, for me it would not work at. If it works for that person, then more power to them.
     
  11. lynn

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    I wonder if her husband would agree with the attitude that it is "no big deal"? I would guess that many spouses of people with diabetes were shocked when their child was diagnosed and it was so hard and complicated! The level of involvement is just so vastly different.
     
  12. Tuff

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    Let's face it. We're all damn jealous and wish it was us:D LOL
     
  13. fdlafon

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    This is similar to an issue that we have had with Jordan. He met a young man through school that is also a T1 D, but doesn't take care of himself in a fashion that I would consider acceptable, and Jordan is always trying to reference this young mans care and "how Noah does it". The problem is, Noah's parents have the "its not a big deal" attitude, and I don't believe that Noah understands what is happening to his body in the long term.

    It's scary!
     
  14. joan

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    After reading your post I have to say that if that person in the conversation has only had one low caused by switching to natural pb (seriously), hasn't been to the dr. in 13 years and is on 2 shots a day than probably his diabetes isn't a big deal. He hasn't had an A1C in 13 years and only one low, I am assuming that his bs's are not in the range we aim for for our children and he probably has a high a1C. I feel sad for that person because they may not have been taught how important good control is in overall health. Maybe his wife has no idea about his d. Some people do it all on their own. Who knows. In general I believe that having d requires some amount of work every day if you are aiming for an A1C in a decent range and if you haven't been to a dr in 13 years things might not be as good as you think they are.
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2011
  15. MommaRetta

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    Okay, color me confused:

    He's Type 1 and only has 2 shots a day? How is that possible? :confused:
    I thought that Type 1's whether child or adult, had to take insulin for whatever they consumed. Is it because he was diagnosed at 18? But, I thought that even at 18, kids are still 'growing' and their bodies haven't really completed their transition to adult-hood until they are in their early 20's.

    Could someone answer this for me? Also, I don't think it's very responsible of either of them for him to have not visited the Dr for 13 years! :eek:

    Of course, I'm very 'under my thumb' oriented with my family when it comes to their health.:rolleyes:
     
  16. 5kids4me

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  17. frizzyrazzy

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    It's very possible he's taking two shots of NPH per day which is tailored to cover a certain amount of carbs. perhaps he eats a very low carb diet as well. NPH acts as a basal insulin but also acts to cover carbs eaten. or he could be taking one lantus as basal and one NPH to get him through the day.

    There are plenty of ways to do it...It's not horribly unusual. Back in the day - that's what people did. They didn't have lantus and short acting like novolog. THey had Regular and NPH and things like lente and ultra lente which I can only imagine how they worked..I have no clue. But people did get by with one shot a day - they gave that shot and it covered their food - because it was given in amounts which handled food. But the draw back was that they DID have to eat 3 meals a day and 2 snacks at the right time (Think steel magnolias when she skipped breakfast and had a seizure). Our kids don't need to do that - they can eat when and how they like. Mine skips meals all the time if he's not hungry. But that wasn't always the case. But I don't think it's all that unusual to find an adult who likes that method and still continues to use it. :)
     
  18. Charlotte'sMom

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    :confused: Can you even get insulin without a prescription? How do you get a prescription without seeing the doctor?
     
  19. funnygrl

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    NPH and Regular are over the counter in most places. You can buy Humalog and Lantus online if you really wanted to, I suppose without a script.
     
  20. MommaRetta

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    That helped a lot! Thanks :)
    In the grand scheme of things, our kids are more fortunate these huh? :cwds:
     

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