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Am I obligated in any way to provide D care while in public school?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by bisous, Jul 24, 2008.

  1. bisous

    bisous Approved members

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    I'm pretty sure that I'm not legally obligated to provide any type of care for my little guy who starts Jr. K in a month. I'm also really not inclined to volunteer to help any more than is absolutely required of me and I'm not really sure why I feel this way. In attending Jr. K, we are going to a school that is about 25 minutes away so it wouldn't be terribly "inconvenient" for me to have to stop by to administer insulin and the like. Still, I have a completely flexible part-time job that would certainly permit me all the time I need to be at school to give insulin or for any other reason. Also, I'd do just about anything to help DS have an awesome experience at school. So why am I recoiling at the thought of doing all D care? I think because I know that they have to legally provide for him and I feel that if I set a precedent of doing all the D care that it will be difficult to step away at a later date. I think I'm also looking forward to a "break" as awful as this sounds.

    I guess I'm posting because I'm just really conflicted about my feelings on the issue. I want to help DS but I want others to be able to help him too....
     
  2. frizzyrazzy

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    no, you're not required to do any of it. They have a legal responsibility to provide the necessary accommodations to your son.
     
  3. Lee

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    What she said...
     
  4. Brensdad

    Brensdad Approved members

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    Ditto. But are you ready to completely turn care for him over to the school? Not everyone has great experiences with D care in public (or private) schools.
     
  5. danismom79

    danismom79 Approved members

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    Not obligated at all.

    And don't feel guilty for needing a break. I almost considered sending my daughter with all her own meals for camp, but then I changed my mind because: 1. I paid them to feed her, and 2. If I don't have to count carbs all day, then da**it I'm not gonna!
     
  6. MamaChrissa

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    What everyone else said! :cwds:

    I know when J started K last year, I was nervous. But he proved very resilient and just loves the attention he gets from everyone because of his "skill" with his finger pokes and pump. Its been a real ego boost for him. :)
     
  7. georgia

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    NO, they need to take care of it all and all of that needs to be in your 504.
    My daughter was in pre K last year and although they had a plan to take care of everything I helped out. For example, her school has a full time nurse who did all of Amalia's injections. And the plan was that another nurse would come in to do the injection if Amalia's nurse had a meeting or something. Good plan, but honestly I went in and did them because I don't know this alternate nurse. Amalia does not know her and I did not want a "stranger" administering my child's insulin. Also I stayed with the nurse the first few times because, well even though she is a nurse, she had trouble the first few times measuring the correct amount of insulin with the 1/2 unit syringes.
    They do need to take care of everything, but because my daughter was so young (4) I wanted and needed to make sure she was comfortable. She was comfortable with her nurse , which is AWESOME, but I am not so sure she would have been comfortable with a nurse she didn't know.
    I had to go in 3x to do insulin, and I also went on field trips. But I offered that and they did have a plan (a random nurse) to go but I wasn't comfortable. When Amalia is old enough to understand how much insulin or food she needs and how to measure etc, I will hopefully be there less.

    Hope that helps. By the way, I was a wreck sending my two to school, but they had a really great year!
     
  8. Flutterby

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    I agree with everyone else.. It took me a while to become comfortable about thinking of having someone else care for Kaylee, because I certaintly COULD go and do it all day.. but I'm not going to.. its NOT fair to her to have mommy showing up at school to check on her, give insulin, count carbs.. I can just see the teasing from other kids... if its a public school, they are office public jr. K then they are obligated to provide someone that if fully trained to take care of him..
     
  9. moco89

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    The school legally has custody of your kid during school hours. Therefore they are legally obligated to provide all necessary D-related care.

    It doesn't matter if you work or are a stay-at-home mom. They have rules that they have to follow, no matter what. They cannot make the parent obligated to do anything for them during school hours. It's their job, once you provide the supplies and the 504 plan.
     
    Last edited: Jul 24, 2008
  10. momtojess

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    What every one else said,...

    I know when Jess started school I felt huilty because I was home and could go do it all. But when I realized Jess like being there, on her own, so that was enough to tell me not to feel guilty. Other K kids didnt have their mommies with them all the time. Of course I was room mom, and volunteered 2 days aweek plus volunteered 2 other days for my boys..lol so i was there anyways.
     
  11. BlessedIAm

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    I don't have the best or a lot of experience in dealing with the school but from the little experience I have had with my child's school they were definitely trying to do as little as possible. As far as I can tell each school and its personnel creates a unique experience but the truth is that the school is legally required to provide "reasonable" accommodations. What may be reasonable to them may not be reasonable to you. At the end of the day this is still your child's life you are talking about and while it would be so nice to have the break you mentioned I also would want to feel comfortable with who I am leaving my child with. Otherwise it wouldn't be much of a break, would it? You'd be constantly worrying and wondering what is going on at school. The first time I ever let DS go anywhere without us (or one of my parents who aslo knows how to take care of his diabetes) was not a good experience and he was with a diabetes educator. I didn't know her though. I did not have a personal relationship with her and she did not know my child. I think a good relationship with the nurse, teacher and any and all other school personnel in contact with my child is key.
     
    Last edited: Jul 24, 2008
  12. tiffanie1717

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    Don't get me started! (see my thread I started today)

    Get a 504. As fast as you can.
     
  13. frizzyrazzy

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    um, no they don't.
     
  14. jane1218

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    What everyone else said... plus make sure you have a 504 plan in place. Do not wait, call the school now and ask who is the 504 coordinator. And, get doctors orders sent out from your endo to the school nurse.

    Remember, just like YDMV, your school nurse competency may vary. There was a school nurse a few years ago at my daughter's school that was uncomfortable correcting lows with just 15 gc so she would make my daughter have juice + snack, 30 gc. When I learned this was going on I had a meeting with the school staff. At my daughter's school they are way more afraid of lows than highs. It seems to me that they would rather the child run a little high all day than risk a low. :mad: uuuggghhhh

    When my daughter was first diagnosed I made a presentation about how to take care of her to everyone who worked with her. I made handouts and had visuals. I did the same thing for the ski team coaching staff.

    #3 below is especially important. I am a spec ed teacher, I know what goes on in schools. Teachers and support staff really want to help but often do not know what to do. Reach out to them and teach them how to care for your child. It is well worth the effort to build that bridge from the beginning.

    Your TO DO list:
    1) call school to get 504
    2) call endo get dr orders sent to school
    3) set up meeting with all adults at the school who will have contact with your daughter, include aides and cafeteria staff.
    4) put together a box of all medical supplies the school will need
    5) put together a box of snacks to send to school

    Hope this helps,
    Jane
     
  15. Tori's Mom

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    You have already received great responses. I just wanted to add that you should not feel bad about needing a break. Having that break will help you keep your sanity. Many previous posters state they had the ability to go to the school but did not....the school needs to step up.
     
  16. Tamara Gamble

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    Request a section 504 plan in writting dated at the top. Call 1-800-diabetes and ask for the discrimination package. Visit www.diabetes.org and view all of the material related to you and your child. View the bottom portion of the home page for this site to view information as well. Good luck to you.

    Tami
     
  17. bisous

    bisous Approved members

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    Thanks for all the replies, guys. I feel reassured that it is okay to want the school to handle D for me and be a safe place for DS. I really appreciate all the responses as they really make me think. I'll be poring over the suggestions and materials as I probably need to get started on this ASAP. I just feel so guilty that I'm actually happy that someone else will have to deal with D but I'm so afraid to let go at the same time. I have a feeling this whole "public school" thing is going to be quite the adjustment...
     
  18. mmc51264

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    Mine is in a daycare/Pre-K right now and they do everything. well, I mihgt add.. I am trying to get him into the school that I teach at (a More at Four program) to make life easier, not to mention the cost fo daycare. I am working on getting him an IEP instead of a 504 becasue of other issues. I feel very comfortable letting others take care of him as long as the "get" it and they communicate with me and DH. It can work well.
     
  19. TracieandJim

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    It was very difficult for me to send DS to our in-home sitter and trust her. Shes great but she still has her moments like today when she wanted to correct at bs265. We use a sliding scale and start at 300. I had to repeat myself several times until she realized she was thinking about checking ketones not giving more insulin. ugh. I put a lot of faith in her. The first day she kept DS I took a deep breath and quickly left. Its been fine since.
     

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