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Am I being unreasonable?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by kajumom, Aug 30, 2013.

  1. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    But by that argument you'd have to ban all thumbtacks, staples, maybe even paperclips. And with regard to blood, all kids bleed - some pick scabs, some get nose bleeds, some fall, some accidentally poke themselves with a thumbtack. Kids are gross. They have all sorts of pathogens on their hands from picking and scratching and all sorts of unsanitary places. The notion that this a legitimate claim based on "some kids in schools have(ing) things like aids and stuff", is a red herring. How many kids in your school do you think have AIDS? And since AIDS isn't magically transmitted via air even a kid with full blown AIDS with bloody hands in the vicinity of other kids stands a zero chance of infecting anyone - besides, when did a simple bg check result in "bloody hands" anyway?
     
  2. missmakaliasmomma

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    Our school district sends out notices when someone in the district has aids. So far its been 2 I think, but I havent been in school in about 7 years so I don't know how many there are now. We live in an area where I don't doubt that there are people who would have it honestly, even kids.

    I'm a serious germaphobe though. I was even thinking about homeschooling my daughter for this reason but sucked it up so now she'll be going to public school and you know what I think about all the time? The first time she's going to catch a stomach virus from one of the kids and be miserable and her sugars will be completely out of whack... this is the way I think lol. Paranoid...
     
  3. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    Wow. That's sad. The school notifies parents that a child in their school has a medical condition? I'm amazed that that's legal.

    Kids trade common germs, it's what they do. Not only will your daughter, "Catch a stomach virus" but she'll pass one on to some other unsuspecting kid. ;)
     
  4. Megnyc

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    Are you in the US?

    Helpful info on how HIV is transmitted (for anyone interested):
    http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/resources/qa/transmission.htm
     
  5. bisous

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    Interesting. Honest to goodness, if I was told a child was carrying around a "needle" because they needed a life saving medication I can't imagine having a problem with that! I mean, a needle just for fun, yeah, I can see that being a problem but with a serious medical condition and its a child, I can't see minding. I just don't see the point.

    The amount of blood is SO, so small really when tested. It would really bother me that the school is making a big deal about it and I would fight it. From (unfortunately) long experience fighting unwilling school districts, I know it can be kind of a slog. The best advice I can give is to try to explain how much trouble it would be to follow the protocol they suggest. Try to maintain their sympathy. I'm SURE they are capable of finding a solution that both satisfies their bloodborne pathogens requirements and provides as little disruption to your DDs life as possible. In my experience it is best if THEY come up with the solution--then there are no objections! Try that first. If that does not work (and it may very well NOT work) then move to the other steps!

    Good luck!
     
  6. Mwills27

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    I had this conversation with my son's school this week. My problem with keeping it locked in the office is that it's his only Glucagon kit and I need it to travel with him. That's why it's always in a secret pocket of his book bag. We ended up making a compromise. The glucagon will stay in his bad, but his bag will go in the resource room, (Which he uses often since he's also Autistic) and that room is always locked when not in use and is adjacent to his classroom. I will in the meantime pick up another Glucagon kit once my insurance kicks in next month, and then I have no problem for them to keep a kit locked in the office. The school secretary will be trained next week in how to use it, so with her being in the office too, it's fine with me.:)

    The test strip issue you're having is over kill in my opinion. Maybe a diabetic educator could talk some sense into them?
     
  7. Joretta

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    Okay, I know the school that sends out notices that a child has AIDS is going there is either out of the country or a lawsuit waiting to happen. HIPPA rights prevail. Even teachers are not told about AIDS unless the parent does the telling. All paperwork only alerts to accommodations. I know I have taught a few. I was livid the first time when the parent told me but my school could not. I was not afraid of getting anything but I felt I should have had a choice for the liability and guilt I would face because this child was a bitter in kindergarten and like another person said kids can and are gross.

    As for the glucagon it can be in the room with a student safely. In lower grades it should be with the teacher. They do that with epi pens in Florida. However in high school I see nothing wrong with it being in the students bag in a set pocket.
     
  8. kajumom

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    Thank you all for you thoughts. The school does not have a nurse. All her teachers were trained on go to administer the glucagon. Who know if they will. Luckily she has a few good friends that if needs would not wait for the adults to stand there and do nothing and they would administer the shot. :)

    They have all other epi pens in the office locked too. I just think that is to late. Less of a concern with someone carrying that needle and more concerned about a kid dying bc of policy to protect the others. That's my opinion anyway. Even without a child with diabetes I think that is a dangerous rule for schools. So far, the VP called Saturday and said she can start Tuesday with it and they will continue to work out the kinks with the superintendent. So until then... It stays.

    The blood test strips and post testing procedures.... You all made very good points. I wouldn't expect my kids to be smearing blood with anyone go had blood on her hands but after she wipes it off (or licks it off) what truly is the difference from any of the stated examples. Out society is so fear based it is sad. I will not let them pale a special rule for her and her poked finger that doesn't include the rest of the scabs in school. :)

    They at sounding concerned about her service dog she will have with her too. I guess parents have already responded to the principal letter that went out saying there will be a dog and please let them know of concerns. Oh boy here we go.
     
  9. Lee

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    UHM WHAT???? That is not even legal in most countries, much less in a school district.
     
  10. Christopher

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    Shouldn't her service dog alert her to a potential low before she would need the Glucagon?
     
    Last edited: Sep 1, 2013
  11. kajumom

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    Yes he will but he may be sick or not feeling well, needing a break and not be with her all day every day.
     
  12. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    Does your dd have a history of serious lows?

    Also, I just noticed that you are not a newbie, but have been at this for 7 years. Was school more accommodating before? Has something changed?
     
  13. kajumom

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    She is hypo unaware and yes we we were doing online school at home the past 4 years. Prior to that was a private school and I worked in the office. My yes, things have changed.
     
  14. caspi

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    I am going to assume that the letter went out about the dog in case there are children that may be allergic to dogs.

    This was my thought as well. Considering she will have a service dog with her and it is properly trained, it should alert in enough time for them to get the glucagon from the nurse. So the glucagon in the nurse's office wouldn't be an issue for me personally.
     
  15. Heather(CA)

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    My son's Gluc is in the office, mostly because there isn't room in his bag. All of the teachers have cake gel frosting I gave them to use if he's out of it. He could carry it in his bag if he wanted to though, he has his syringes in his bag anyway...They have never even asked about his test strips but he usually just keeps them in his case until he can throw them away...No biggie, you are not overreacting.
     
  16. Heather(CA)

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    How would you feel about pens, pencils, stick pins? Scissors? tacks, etc...If my son can't carry what he needs to take care of himself then you better get rid of everything else that's sharp too...
     
  17. ksartain

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    Our school system does NOT want glucagon at all. They said if they have to even administer cake icing gel, they are calling 911 and they will have glucagon on board. I have to have a separate doctor's note for Chris to be able to have Glucagon at school.

    We decided to not have it at school, but all I have to do is call and get it approved. I'm thinking I may have the doctor write a note for him to keep it on him in his kit that stays on him. I bought him a hiking fanny pack so he doesn't have to carry it everywhere, he can just wear it.
     
  18. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    But who will administer it?

    FWIW, http://forums.childrenwithdiabetes.com/showthread.php?t=70786
     
  19. Beach bum

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    EMT's probably won't administer it either.
    I'd find out your state rules r/e administration of glucagon. Just because the school says they don't want to do, doesn't mean it's OK. It may be that the school nurse is the only one to administer.
     
  20. mamamccoy87

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