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Am I being unreasonable?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by kajumom, Aug 30, 2013.

  1. kajumom

    kajumom Approved members

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    Maybe... maybe b/c my dd has not done public school, maybe b/c she is going to be a 9th grader, maybe b/c I am a mom...

    Had a meeting with the school again today. With the teachers of her classes and admin. They said she is not going to be allowed to take her glucagon with her in the school (in her box, in her bag). They said b/c it is a needle it has to stay in a locked box in the office. HHHHmmmmm. Doesn't that defeat the purpose?! I explained to them that if needed that would/could be to late. I asked about others needing epi-pens or similar and they said they are kept in a locked box in the office. They said it is policy and that they have XXXX number of other kids in the school to worry about. Like she is going to go crazy and stick people with her "glucose" single shot... I said she has to have her shot with her all the time. Just something she carries with her like her glucometer. I began to wonder after the meeting, how does that mean she plays volleyball games that are away (or home evening games when the school is closed but she can't have one with her) and ride the bus with this shot in her possession or NOT in her possession? Is that against the law to require??

    The other thing I thought to be odd (new to me at least) is that after she checks she needs to go wash and put the strip in the office bio-hazard. Other kids are not allowed to touch her b/c she will have had blood on her hand. I get the blood pathogens things but oh my. Again... maybe I am being unreasonable or just not used to this.
     
  2. valerie k

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    matts glucagon is kept in the office. I can see the point, unless everybody is trained on how to give the shot, its useless for her to carry. In 9th grade, she will have many teachers during the day. We were lucky enough to get a select few to willingly learn to give the shot.... Im sure not every teacher he has would be willing.

    As for the strips, I would cut a tiny hole in a strip container and make that the biohazard container... and as for blood, what do they do with students with nasty paper cuts, or nose bleeds? Matt would be a walking biohazard, he wipes his blood on his jeans constantly....:rolleyes:
     
  3. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    I think glucagon on a D kid's person is pretty useless without someone, trained and willing to get it, mix it and inject it. Unless your school is enormous then it might be the same time delay in getting the gluc to her with a trained person, as having the gluc there but waiting for someone trained to arrive to give it.

    On the bio hazard stuff, that's moronic. Did you say this is a public school?
     
  4. swellman

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    Our son carries his glucagon with him everywhere. All of his teachers and PE coaches and bus driver are trained by the school nurse. Without said training I agree it would be useless to carry around. Where are the epi pens for those students with severe allergies?
     
  5. Beach bum

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    My daughter does carry glucagon in her kit. But, it is more because it's her grab and go bag at home. Sometimes it's because she's going out with my husband and I am not there to be her Sherpa, or going to a friends house where the parents are willing to use glucagon. In this case, it's just easier to always have in her bag.

    I don't even think the school knows it's in the bag. I figure if it does come up, all I will say is "oops, we forgot to take it out this weekend." The reality is, she couldn't use it on herself, so IMO, I wouldn't fight this one. Just talk to the school and make sure any and all classrooms she is in have a source of fast acting sugar in the event of lockdown and always make sure her kit is stocked.

    As for the strips...Oy.
    I would ask them about paper cuts, bloody noses, picked zits.:rolleyes:
    My daughter carries a Tic Tac container and she puts her strips in there. I have hand sanitizer in her bag, but most likely, she will just lick her finger when done:eek:
     
  6. swellman

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    Yea, the test strip thing and blood on hands thing is completely irrational.
     
  7. Mish

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    My son's is in his bag but only because it seems to be the easiest place. That said, no one at school is official trained, though I have an off the record verbal confirmation from one of the teachers at the school, a friend of mine, that she will happily do it if needed. But otherwise, the thing could be locked for all the good that it will do.

    So, I don't really see a huge issue if it's locked up. However, I would request that a separate glucagon one be left with her coach in his first aid kid, locked or not, it should be with the coach at all times, especially if they travel. They must have a procedure in place for that already, he must travel with epi-pens and other medications.
     
  8. AmandaF

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    My son's is kept in the clinic @ school because that is what we decided. He is only in 3rd grade. However, the nurse gave me a simple form to fill out that states he is allowed to carry ALL needed supplies with him at all times. So if we decided to he could carry his insulin pens, glucagon and meters with him. I was told by the school admin that by law they have to allow him to have all of his supplies with him, if that is what we decide.
     
  9. TheLegoRef

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    Ours is in the office as well, but my son does carry one in his d bag. Not sure if the school knows about that or not, but he's allowed to carry all supplies with him, so I doubt they would object to that. My other son's epi-pen is kept in the office as well.
     
  10. Traci

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    Our glucagon is kept in the nurse's office. My son keeps fast acting glucose with him in his kit, checks often, and typically feels his lows. He is in 7th grade.
     
  11. virgo39

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    DD's school Glucagon kit is in a cabinet in the nurse's office.

    On the strips issue, I think it is important to at least understand the perspective of the schools. They may have legal requirements intended to identify school personnel that are at-risk for exposure to bloodborne pathogens and have training and a plan for how to minimize those risks -- I believe that they are required to assume that any blood contains bloodborne pathogens.

    ETA:

    29 C.F.R. 1910.1030(b): "Universal Precautions is an approach to infection control. According to the concept of Universal Precautions, all human blood and certain human body fluids are treated as if known to be infectious for HIV, HBV, and other bloodborne pathogens."

    1910.1030(d)(1): "General. Universal precautions shall be observed to prevent contact with blood or other potentially infectious materials. Under circumstances in which differentiation between body fluid types is difficult or impossible, all body fluids shall be considered potentially infectious materials."

    29 C.F.R. 1910.1030

    And from a medical standpoint, I think we all recognize that hand-washing is one of the most effective ways of preventing the spread of disease.

    To be clear, I would not want my daughter to have to deposit used strips in a biohazard container (unless as one of the pp's described, a DIY one) or take other measures that we don't take at home. I just don't think that the school's initial position is completely off-the-wall -- and I do hope that you are able to work with the school on a sensible approach that works for your DD.
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2013
  12. hdm42

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    No you're not being unreasonable.
    The test strip routine they are suggesting is ridiculous and a huge loss of class time for your daughter. Test strips are not a blood born pathogen risk. She can wipe her hand on a tissue, wrap the strip in it and throw it in the trash. If they insist on disposal in a biohazard container, you should insist that they provide one in each classroom that she will be in. As was already mentioned, what do they do about paper cuts, skinned knees, bloody noses, etc?

    The glucagon thing is a battle that may or may not be worth fighting. My son's is kept in the nurse's office, because only RN's can legally inject him with it. That law has very recently changed, but the schools seem to be dragging their feet on getting others trained. The big question is whether there are other people trained to inject glucagon. If not, then there's no real advantage in her carrying it. Just my humble opinion.
     
  13. Lee

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    We keep our glucagon in the nurses office and the coach's first aid kit. As for the strips, I have never ever heard of that policy.
     
  14. KatieSue

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    She has two glucagons at school. One in the health office and one in the Athletic training office. She does athletic training after school so I have a second emergency kit there as she spends so much time there. I've had her carry one in her backpack at different times. No one said I couldn't :D

    The strips she just throws back in her kit. If licking counts then yes she washes her hands after every test.

    She doesn't do sports but she's on the speech and debate team. The adviser got glucagon trained and checks out the glucagon from the nurses office when they have away events. It shouldn't be a huge problem for the volleyball coach to keep one in their first aid kit.
     
  15. Mish

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    Here's the problem with this in a school setting, especially in the case of the OP who's child is in 9th grade. Do they make all girls throw their used sanitary supplies in biohazard containers? In the grammar schools, do they make every child who picks a scab toss their tissue in the biohazard container? Do they take every sharp object out of the classroom that might poke someone?
     
  16. mom24grlz

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    Ashleigh actually keeps a thing of glucagon in the nurses office and in her purse with her. It's written in her 504 that she is allowed to carry it.
     
  17. virgo39

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    I agree that it presents a challenge in a school setting. My point is that the school does have a legitimate perspective and has to create a plan to address these things. And I suppose if used sanitary supplies were not properly disposed of in the trash, urine or feces didn't make it into a toilet, or a kid vomited, all of those things would be treated as if they had blood borne pathogens.
     
    Last edited: Aug 30, 2013
  18. MomofSweetOne

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    You forgot how much blood there can be with loose teeth. As the kids wiggle them, the blood gets on their fingers, on the desks, on their papers,.... The one small drop on a test strip doesn't even begin to compare to the contamination from the simple loss of teeth.
     
  19. Joretta

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    I would contact ADA as they can give you your state Laws and provide you help getting this sorted out. I would ask if every student also walks to the office to dispose of used kleenexes and bandaids they all contain fluids in a more open way than a strip does. Also do all students keep all cuts covered and washed especially if they crack and leak a little, not to mention the germs around a blown nose do they go wash their face. The strip thing is ridiculous. Fight that until they have same policy for blowing noses. Oh, another fluid issue kids who bite nails saliva is all over those hands do they go constantly to wash their hands.

    As for the glucagon depending on the laws in your area it is a fight. Thanks to state laws my child can carry it, but her teachers are still no required to be trained. But we have an emergency go to person in every building who can use it. Thanks to a teacher each year volunteering to be trained. But we are on a her 4th and final year.
     
  20. missmakaliasmomma

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    If I was a mother without a child with diabetes I would not be ok with someone carrying around a needle around her in school. So with that being said, I understand why it has to be locked up.

    i get the blood too. Schools are very weary about this now since there are some kids in schools that have things like aids and stuff. How would you feel if a child had blood on their hands around your daughter?
     

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