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adrenaline highs and food

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by shannong, Apr 20, 2013.

  1. shannong

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    My DS is playing in his hockey tournament this weekend. I have been able to see that the adrenaline highs from hockey, both send his bg's way up and make him very insulin resistant. He played his first 2 games Friday night, both in the 400's. I gave him correction shots before the games, during the games, and after the games and nothing brought it down until the rage bolus I did at the end of the night. It was crazy. Surprising, he still played really well and earned the MVP player award. Still, I don't want him playing with such high bg's. Blood sugars were a little better today during the game, but I had to be a lot braver and give him a lot of extra insulin before the game and still it wasn't quite enough. It's scary frankly having to give so much extra insulin, before they go into a sporting event, but I am realizing that this is what he needs. I have been doing a lot of blood checks though and running to the bench to do checks too (which the coaches have been really cool about).

    I do have a question though about food and exercise: First, after my son finished playing his first game on Friday night, he said that he was starving. It had been about 3 hours since he had last eaten and he still had another hour to go before his next game. The problem was, his numbers were in the 400's. I wanted to just give him a correction shot and delay the food until after the second game. I was pretty sure that any food eaten at that point would give me no chance of getting his numbers down before the next game. My husband thought that he should not go into the next game hungry. So we ended up giving him food, I covered the food and gave him a correction dose. His numbers did not come down at all. I'm not sure what was the right thing to do in this situation - feed him or not? It's hard to deny a hungry kid, but at the same time if he is insulin resistant at that point, is his body even able to use any of the energy derived from food?
     
  2. sugarmonkey

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    I would have given him something to eat. He would've needed the energy from the food to be able to play the next game. As far as the insulin and sports, it's an experiment for us. I struggle to get things right for Phillip when it comes to sports. And different sports affect him different ways. You'll probably just have to keep trying different things and see what works for your son.
     
  3. Heather(CA)

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    This might help...
    http://forums.childrenwithdiabetes.com/showthread.php?t=20211&highlight=Gatorade+trick+explained

    Also, he is more likely to come down with less insulin not more. Adrenaline highs come down best when they are treated like a rebound (Without the low). The highs are from the liver kicking out glucose so if you give big corrections the liver won't take the glucose back, keeping him high. Whatever the correction would be, subtract a unit or two, the higher he is the more you would subtract. I know it sounds weird but it does work. Watch him at night because he will drop.

    If he starts high he will probably stay high, that's what my son does anyway...

    Let him eat.

    I hope this helps :)
     
  4. shannong

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    That does seem counter- intuitive. I'm not so sure though because I definitely started out with conservative corretions (50% of what I would normally give) and he only pushed higher. I read the post you sent - sipping gatorade actually helped him from going higher?? Interesting. Do I have that right??

    I would say that the only thing I have figured out is that if he starts out at an even slightly high number (like 160's), then he pushes much, much higher, no matter how much IOB there is. However, if he starts in the low 100's than he doesn't seem to spike. However, for his game today, I had him in the low 100's and he didn't play well. We had to keep giving him glucose tabs. He suffered out there today, complained of feeling low, but never actually went low. He plays best I would say in the 150's but it seems to take a miracle to get him perfectly to that number. The adrenaline spikes seem to occur only during the real high pressure type games (not practices or regular season games).

    I will keep watching and observing any patterns and hopefully be able to manage his numbers better. This weekend he played with sky high bg's and then the final game he was feeling too low. This ain't easy!
     
  5. hawkeyegirl

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    We have a saying on here - YDMV (Your Diabetes May Vary). ;) We definitely have to do full corrections (plus some) for adrenaline highs. The "gatorade trick" is just simply that you should use fast-acting carbs to keep them up during periods of intense activity. In our experience, it does NOT prevent adrenaline spikes. With some practice, you will figure out what works best for your son.
     
  6. nanhsot

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    Definitely a YDMV thing, and even for us, a YDMVAD (your diabetes may vary any day!!)

    In general, we don't correct adrenaline highs, unless they get over 350ish and he feels horrible. If he feels OK, his performance is good, we leave them alone and they tend to drift down naturally in the hours after a game. If he's feeling off in any way, he'll do some corrections, not aggressive but strong.

    Going into the game at a good number is key, as you have found out.

    Eating after I personally would never deny, can't answer for all kids but mine is STARVING after a big game. I can't imagine denying a testosterone filled, adrenaline pumped, blood sugar raging male after his favorite sport ends!

    His coach owns a pizza parlor, so it was a challenge! Our personal experience is that he treated aggessively for the pizza but did not generally correct at all during or just after games; I can recall one game this year where I ran for insulin and injected during, I could tell from the sidelines that he was off, didn't have good reaction time, just wasn't himself, tested and he was 350ish and insulin was needed. I tend to treat the symptoms and not the number during games, and trust his gut.
     
  7. Tigerlilly's mom

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    My son's ideal number is also 150 going into a game. We have found that having insulin working during a game does help some with the adrenaline highs. We have also found that he can NOT have gatorade or any other drink that contains carbs in it while he is playing a sport because he goes SUPER high.

    Out of all the sports my son plays, I find hockey to be the most difficult to figure out. I have not been able to completely ward off the adrenaline highs but have learned that if he goes out a good number he plays well and then we deal with the high after the fact. Being a teen, my son will not wait to eat! To prevent lows later, I will give insulin for his bg, and will bolus for all his food minus about 10-15 carbs.

    It takes lots of trial and error to find what will work from your child, and what works for one season may not work for the next.

    Good luck and congrats to him!
     
  8. shannong

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    Thanks for all the input everyone, it is very helpful. It is amazing to me how much adrenaline complicates things. If my DS is running around doing pretty much any other activity he needs more carbs, plain and simple. Playing hockey games is a whole other thing.
     
  9. Heather(CA)

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    The reason I use gatorade is because it's made to drink while playing sports. I can see glucose tabs slowing him down...Try just taking a unit or two off of the correction rather than only giving half. Sports are hard, oyu have to play with it to see what works best for your son...
     
  10. cdninct

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    Hi there!

    I just saw notification from another board I am on of a hockey camp for kids with t1d to be held in Milton this August. It is for kids from 8-12--I don't know if your little guy will be turning 8 any time soon. I bet you could get a lot of ideas from that group! Here's the link:

    http://www.dskatehockey.ca/
     
  11. shannong

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    Thanks for the info, looks great. He is only 7 (just in feb), so maybe we will wait until next year. Good to know.
     

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