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about self testing....

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by TheTestingMom, Aug 24, 2010.

  1. TheTestingMom

    TheTestingMom Approved members

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    My son will be in 3rd grade. I'd like him to test in the classroom. But the nurse mentioned that we couldn't ask the teacher to stop what she is doing and look at his number and make sure he treats correctly. I hate the thought of him leaving the classroom everytime he feels low/high/off etc. Seemed like he was out of the classroom a lot last year. I trust that he would be able to treat himself if he was low. But would need him to go to the office / call me for a BG bolus. Am I expecting too much for a 9 year old? Not sure how he would remember to re-test in 15 minutes however.
     
  2. KHM

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    I think, depending on your son's abilities, there's no reason to not test in class at specific times or under certain circumstances. I would just define an "OK" range that allows him to stay in class. Everything outside of that range means going to Health Room. Just make sure he knows to retest if he doesn't begin to feel better.
     
  3. juliesmom

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    We are kinda in the same boat this year. Julie lost a lot of class time last year from testing and just walking to the nurses office. This year the nurses office is further away so we have decided Julie will test in class when she feels the need, she is pretty good at catching lows in the 70s and knows when to take a glucose tab, she must go to the nurse for corrections which the nurse calls us for the ok. But she will continue to go to the nurses office before lunch and 20 minutes before getting on the bus. So far so good but it was only the second day of 3rd grade.
    *Bonus this year is her teacher is a former RN! Julie is the youngest diabetic on the campus and her teacher has had one in her class every year for the last 5 years.
     
  4. KHM

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    Brilliant!
     
  5. mommylovestosing

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    Ella cannot test in class. It's a county law. I will be fighting it for next year, when she is a tad older. Anyone had to do this?

    For the OP - we have an index card with low number ranges and carbs for each to bring that number up to what we want. It comes in handy a lot when Ella is not with me (church, gym, friends house). She has learned to read it and use it correctly. Not sure if something like this would help you?
     
  6. jules12

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    We started in baby steps testing in the classroom - 1st we just did one check so he could get use to it and prove he could be responsible. Then he checked anytime he felt bad (which he doesn't always feel but he had the option). Now he checks all bgs in the classroom. He goes to the nurse to dose for lunch and gives her a note with his BG readings on it. He checks in the afternoon and if they have a snack, he doses for that in the classroom and then drops that info by the nurse on the way to the bus.

    If he is out of range, he treats if low and then goes to the nurses office for follow-up. I have a little form for him to follow. PM me if you would like to see a copy.
     
  7. mommylovestosing

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    It's a blood borne pathogen issue, from what I've been told :rolleyes:.

    I say as long as there are staplers, tumb tacks, push pins, and scissors in the classroom then they should not have that rule. Her's is controlled.
     

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