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Abbott flash glucose monitor

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by AliciaM, Oct 16, 2013.

  1. AliciaM

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  2. Mish

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    Not exactly. It seems like it's not a real time monitor, it has no alarms, but it is being billed as fingerstick replacement quality.

    That said: "We look for the Flash Glucose Monitoring system to be available in Europe as soon as the second half of 2014. While there is no current timeline for the United States, we are hopeful Abbott will bring the product to the US."

    It won't get to the US market for years and years. It's not even submitted to the FDA yet, it's new technology that has little data to show it's accuracy. Even existing companies like Dexcom and Minimed have not been able to get fingerstick replacement certification and they have study after study after study. There's no way this one will. Not any time soon.
     
  3. hawkeyegirl

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    Why the heck wouldn't they put alarms and some sort of transmission capability on that thing? By the time they get that out here, Dex Gen 6 will be out, which will be fingerpoke replacement, alarms, and 40 foot range. Abbott is so freaking weird. By all accounts, they have the best sensor technology, but can't figure out how to do the "easy" stuff, lol.
     
  4. mmgirls

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    I think it is interesting.

    I can see how this has the possibility to let those that are not interested in CGMing get a better idea of BGs between checks.

    IF they get it approved as a finger stick replacement with no calibration and it last 14 days there will a market for it.

    I wonder if they are working an angle or loophole when not choosing go go th CGM route.
     
  5. hawkeyegirl

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    But the vast majority of people who aren't interested in CGM don't do it because they don't want the site on their body. It's not like the twice daily calibrations are that burdensome.

    This makes no sense to me, commercially. None.
     
  6. MomofSweetOne

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    Agreed. Creating data mining devices without useful alarms to prevent problems is crazy. I'm beginning to wonder if some of these companies ever move out of their design studios to talk to people living with D IRL to see what we want/need.
     
  7. moco89

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    Because this is probably an optical sensor and that requires a lot more electronic equipment, which would be hard to carry around on your body.

    Think of the very old meters back from the late 1980s to early 1990s, that measured glucose based on optics, such as the Onetouch Basic, Surestep, etc.

    What Abbott pulled off really is an engineering feat. There are professors in my department at my university that are currently working on optical glucose sensors as research.
     
  8. hawkeyegirl

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    I'll take your word for it that it's an engineering feat, and that doesn't really surprise me, given the accuracy of the Nav sensors. But they've created something that is still invasive, 99% useless at night, and for most T1s isn't as attractive as the current CGM systems. If they were just a research lab, it would make more sense, but presumably they intend to make money on their products.
     
  9. MomofSweetOne

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    We may be looking at this through a T1 lens with concerns about nighttime lows, whereas they may be looking at the much, much larger T2 market who is very limited on strips and doesn't necessarily need the low alarms if they're not on insulin. Many T2s have expressed horror at the amount of times my T1 tests, and this product might be very appealing to them, especially if it doesn't involve another poke but can give readings whenever they wish to look.
     
  10. Mish

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    I didn't mean to sound like I thought it was stupid technology, I'm sure it has a great market, somewhere. Babies? Perfect. Hospital settings? Nursing homes? My father?? All would probably work great with this. I could aslo see people who hate finger sticking in public wearing this (kids at school?) but how closely it has to be waved, and where you can wear it, are all unknown.

    But, it's not a CGM system. Abbott already HAS the (undeniably) most accurate CGM on the market - not in the US though. I just don't really have a whole lot of faith that they'd get this to market in the US any time soon.
     
  11. AliciaM

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    Just to clarify, because I knew this would happen, I didn't say cgm I said cgm-like because of the sensor.
     
  12. wearingtaci

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    I think it looks neat,very Star Trek-ish. I could see it being a viable alternative for those that avoid,or are difficult to get them to check BS,babies/toddlers and maybe teens come to my mind
     
  13. hawkeyegirl

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    But if those people have already decided against a CGM, I don't see them going for this, honestly. The market seems small.
     
  14. mmgirls

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    I have met allot of adult that will not CGM because it is not a replacement for a finger stick. I believe that this would be a great asset for thoseb that only test 4 times a day.

    I can see a big population of people that would now choose to put one of these gizmos on IF they no longer had to "test their fingers".

    I think this will be aimed towards type 2 ers, and will be a great improvement to gaining insight on whether by their regime is working or not.
     

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