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A little afraid of pumping, and a little afraid of not pumping

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by MamaBear, May 30, 2011.

  1. MamaBear

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    My son has been dead set against getting a pump, did not want anything attatched to him, and has wanted to remain on MDI. I have thought he is old enough to discuss and decide such a thing along with me. And I have seen no need in pushing the issue. But at our last visit to the endo, even though his A1C was pretty good, there was a problem I didn?t post about that is leading me to kind of want to push him to pump. He has Hypertrophy in his belly and cannot use it for injections until about January of next year. :( We are definitely rotating shots, but since I tried to do that before and it still resulted in the belly problems, I am worried it may happen to the areas we are injecting now, legs,arms,bootie, and that we?ll end up with no place to inject. We are scheduled for a pump class next week just to see what it is all about.
    I do have my own fears about pumping, one being cost, I have a 5K deductable, but I have already decided to forgoe the new kitchen floor I saved up for and put that towards the pump, after all we can live with a crappy floor a few years longer, whatever. I am concerned though about monthly costs, if it costs more each month than what we are doing now, I?m not sure I can manage it. I am also a bit scared because of things I have seen posted here, occlusions,boluses not delievered, problems with sites,problems with products and the companies, on and on. Are there more problems? Or more positives with pumping? I also read things like dual wave bolus, square bolus, and think WTH is that? I feel so afraid I just won?t understand how to do any of it. Reading some things on here it just seems so out of my range of comprehension. I also have absolutely no clue about any pumping products or options. Can anyone offer any words of wisdom? Anything that might make me feel less afraid of pumping?
     
  2. Tuff

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    I think you would have the same fears with the sites you choose for the pump as for the needles, so if that is your reasoning to switch perhaps get the kitchen floor. Using the same areas over and over with the pumps sites can have the same problems as injection sites. We've never been able to use the stomach die to zero fat. Only arms and bum here and I do worry about that too whether we are on the pump or needles.

    Cost of supplies can be an issue - I am in Canada and it is covered by our work insurance - but if it wasn't covered I think we would have to go off the pump.
     
  3. hrtmom3

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    The only advice I have here are towards your fears of pumping. Remember the fears of when your son was first dxd and all you had to learn. It's scary, but you did it and you continue to do it daily. . It's kind of the same with pumping; it's different and can be scary at first, but you can do it and there will always be people here to help you through it.

    My son also had very strong feelings of not wanting anything attached to him.
    Because of issues he was having with Lantus, at one visit the CDE was finally able to convince him to let her put a site in for a few days. That was the beginning of him changing his mind about pumping. He has fallen in love with his pump and now would be completely lost without it.
     
  4. BrokenPancreas

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    Mama -

    I was so afraid of the pump, basically from reading here what COULD happen.

    But you know, life is SO MUCH more "normal" for everyone.

    It's a learning curve, but you can hold me to this, after two weeks, you will be like "why did I wait so long"?

    Also, if he gets the Animas Ping, he can have a remote, so if he's out with a bunch of friends, he can bolus himself, and they probably will think he's on the phone!
     
  5. TheFormerLantusFiend

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    You can get hypertrophy with pump sites too. In fact, minimed offers little temp tattoos so you can keep track of the last place you put a pump site.

    How is your current site rotation going? What are you doing? What size needles are you using? When you inject the stomach (for instance) do you avoid injecting in the same part of the stomach you injected last time?

    Many people successfully use pumps without knowing how to use any special features.
     
  6. MamaBear

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    That's one of my other concerns is Lantus. We seem to always end up on some in between the lines dose that requires a magnifying glass just to try to get it almost close enough. Thanks.

    The remote would definitely be a plus.

    I was thinking maybe the hypertrophy would be less likely since you are changing a site every few days. :(

    Right now we are not using his belly at all, I think part of the problem is that is all he was using at school, and at home too. When I was doing injections I would use his arms or legs, but he was really favoring his belly, and he absolutely refused bootie shots. Now he knows that because we were told no belly for 6-8 months, he has to take bootie shots. We do right cheek,right arm,left arm,left leg,right leg,left cheek,back to right cheek and continue with that cycle. I do try to to switch sides to avoid using the same site as the time before. For humalog we have the nano pen needles. For Lantus we use syringes 8mm. Any suggestions?
     
  7. hawkeyegirl

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    I'd say 99% of kids who try pumping (even the reluctant ones) don't want to go back. It really is THAT good. There are more things to troubleshoot, but the advantages so outweigh the downsides that it's not even a close call for us. There is a reason that most people on this site eventually move to pumping. For us (and those folks), it's much closer to a "normal" life.

    I know that Medtronic has a 30 day return policy. If he tries it and hates it, you're only out the cost of supplies. But I suspect both of you would love it and wish you would have done it sooner.

    It sounds like the issue with site rotation was that he was doing many of his own shots and using the same spots over and over. With pumping, you would be doing the site changes for a while, and you should easily be able to do the site rotation so that there are no issues. We have used stomach exclusively for sites for 3+ years now and it looks as good as it did before he was diagnosed.
     
  8. TheFormerLantusFiend

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    To my knowledge there are no good studies on what does or doesn't work to prevent lipoatrophy in diabetics on insulin. I spent a long time years ago trying to find some good hard data and I didn't find it.

    I'm looking again now and still not finding it.

    What I do find are case reports and theories. There are case reports that suggest that some people have autoimmune reactions at the injection sites that can be the problem. As evidence, switching the type of insulin used has helped. Also as evidence, in one really weird case, a woman with diabetes developed vitiligo in all of her injection sites.

    There are enough case reports to show that people on all different kinds of insulin treatments on the market can get lipoatrophy but there isn't anything that compares the rates between those on shots vs those on pumps. There are case reports that showed people seeing an improvement from switching to shots from pumps, as well as from pumps to shots. I don't know why.

    Some of the things that help people seem to be: switching insulins, more site rotations, cleaning the injection area and using a new needle each time, using small needles, switching to or from pumping, and some medications I haven't researched.
    Since lipoatrophy is also more commonly found in skinny diabetics, it makes sense to me that it would help to gain weight, but I suppose that's not as easily said as done.
     
  9. StillMamamia

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    Another thing to consider is that occlusions, non-deliveries, site problems and problems with products are actually not that many, IMO,if you take into account the lenght of time people are wearing a pump. People usually don't post here "Hey, we have no site issues." but they will post "Ack! Occlusion! Help!", see what I mean? So, it's not like every week we have a pump or site issue.

    There are alternatives to people with sensitive skin, reacting to either the infusion set adhesive.

    The pump "lingo" is just that. You start off with a simple bolus, and then you try using the other stuff, depending on what food is eaten and how the body reacts to it, and what type of activity, illness, etc. It's a bit like a cellphone. You can dial a person by dialling the number, or you can go to your contact list, choose the person you want to dial and use that feature. It's just a different way of doing things and you get used to it.

    I am wondering whether switching rapid insulins will help with the hypertrophy:confused:

    Good luck with your choice.
     
  10. MamaBear

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    Thanks both of you. I appreciate all of the input. He has indeed been favoring his belly, and he is skinny. He was born 8lbs 13 ounces but for some reason stayed under the average percentile for weight and height his past 11 years. Boy eats like a horse, but he is very thin. It's hard to find places to inject him because of it. :(
     
  11. MamaBear

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    I suppose that's true huh? Noone saying "hey pump is fantastic no issues today! " ;)
     
  12. mommabear

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    I did exactly this..We were worried about the pump and after we got it I Said exactly that "why did I wait so long"...We took a few classes for the pump and it was a little over whelming at first, but we got it..We are still learning things about it..:cwds: My son is on the ping and he loves the remote..
    I beleave the postive out ways the negative:cwds:
     
  13. DsMom

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    I would not give my son's pump up for anything, and neither would he. I find the positives of pumping HUGELY outweigh any negatives. In more than a year an a half, we've only had one occlusion alarm. I see site issues as a minor annoyance of an amazingly wonderful technology. As far as the terminology, like another poster said, you will learn in time. I just learned (HERE!) what a square wave bolus was a few weeks ago and have been happily trying it out. Still not great with dual wave (or as the Ping calls, it a combo bolus), but it's all live and learn. You don't HAVE to use dual wave or square wave...they are only tools that you may choose to use in time when you are ready. None of us know what we are doing at the start...your endo, a pumping coach/CDE, and everyone here will hold your hand at the beginning.


    That said, your son is old enough to have input into this, so I would really respect his wishes. My son never complained about having anything attached to him, but he is much younger. Like anything, he would surely get used to it so he wouldn't even notice it in time. Our kids are part of the gadget generation anyway...what's one more!!??:rolleyes::p

    Good luck. Don't be scared!;)
     
  14. Susanne

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    As was mentioned before, I believe finding good sites for injections/needles is as much of an issue with the pump as with shots.
    Sophia has been on the pump now for 6 months. When she started, I was also worried and anxious. After the first two weeks the worries started to go away and by now we love it so much that there is no way we would go back to shots (nor would she).
    Of all the problems I anticipated in the beginning we had only two "pump not primed" alarms which were the result of a faulty reservoir (Animas helped resolve the problem quickly).
     
  15. MamaBear

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    These are our two biggest issues, trying to find good spots on a skinny boy, and cost. He and I are talking it over, but I'm leaving the cost part out of it. He doesn't need extra worry. I'm having one of those I hate diabetes days. :(
     

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