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A couple of newbie questions..

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Melanie1216, Jun 18, 2013.

  1. Melanie1216

    Melanie1216 Approved members

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    First, thank you to everyone for the responses to my original post. I am feeling a bit better-it varies from day to day. I wake up feeling very depressed about it and feel it gets better from there. I feel like I am so confused about this whole thing-will I ever feel like I "get it"? the nurse calls everyday for the #'s and says it is fine and changes things here and there but I still feel so confused. My daughter has been having lots of lows-like everyday. They took her off of the lantis for now since I guess she is in the honeymoon period. she still has lows and it is so nerve wracking. We have a pool and she is very active otherwise. so we have been trying to play around with the swimming and yesterday I didn't even give her any insulin with lunch and by bedtime she was 56. I don't really know what I am asking here.. maybe some reassurance that someday it will be a bit easier and make more sense? I have heard it gets even harder after the honeymoon period and that scares me a lot...
    Also, I know I am supposed to be doing bloodchecks after 2 hours of no eating but it seems like with snacks and everything I have to be like a drill sergeant to get that to work out , to get a true blood sugar..Meanwhile my 7 year old and 22 month old also need attention and I am headed back to work Monday. I really really hate diabetes and want to scream that from the rooftop at this point...
    thanks for listening.. :(
     
  2. nebby3

    nebby3 Approved members

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    It sounds like your dd is entering a pretty string honeymoon. Some people find the honeymoon easier; some find it more difficult. On one hand, the body helps you keep highs away; on the other, it spits out insulin when you aren'e expecting it and can't control it.

    Swimming definitely means lows for us. Unfortunately, if you are not givign insulin anyway, you can't reduce it so you will just have to treat the lows. 56 is low but it is not record setting. Some day it will not phase you (though numbers like 20 always take their toll).

    I had a 3yo and an infant when my dd (who was 1) was diagnosed. I think it definitely changed their personalities. The baby came to realize quickly that even though he was s screaming newborn, his needs were not first priotity; diabetes often had to come first. And the 3yo came to be very concerned about his sister and still at almost 13 takes too much of the world on his shoulders I think. Diabetes changes the whole family.

    I wouldn't worry too much about the not eating for 2 hrs thing. I suppsoe they want to see how meal boluses work themselves out to see if they are working but I think my dd also does not often go 2hrs without eating. Are you on a flexible regimen where you know how to give insulin for extra snacks if she wants them?
     
  3. Turtle1605

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    Hang in there! Our finger pricking schedule is (1) before food...this is to get the starting level and to determine if any "correction" insulin is needed and (2) two hours after food...this is the only way to know whether we are giving the right amount of insulin. We know if he is low 2 or 3 days in a row when we check his finger 2 hours after lunch, then we need to reduce the amount of insulin we give him for lunch (referred to as his insulin:carb ratio). If we eat anything with carbs in that 2-hour period, it makes it impossible to judge if our I:C ratio is correct. We do eat carb-free snacks in that time period though. Of course, we also do finger checks at 2 am, first thing in the morning and before bed...to make sure he is not low or close to low heading into the night.

    In our experience, once we got the I:C ratios accurate...we loosened up a bit on the strict schedule. But...we frequently return to that schedule when levels start fluctuating. It is my understanding that the fluctuations happen frequently with with this disease, but we get some times of smooth sailing to rest :).

    We also are becoming familiar with what activities cause lows. For example, I know that swimming makes my son go low. I test him before he swims and if he is below 100, I give him a juice box before he jumps in and test him about every 30-45 minutes. We also have the rule that if he feels low...he is to get out of the water immediately. He doesn't always feel lows in the water though which is why we check frequently and he never swims alone. You will learn over time which activities effect his levels and how (although there are times when I am blind-sided by things...which is why frequent testing is so important).

    It is exhausting but a lot of it becomes pure habit.

    Note that Lantus also required changes for us. It is actually the main reason we decided to use an insulin pump. My son requires 8 times more basal insulin at night than during the day and the pump allows us to set up to 24 different basal rates during a 24-hour period. When/if you get to that point there is something called "basal testing" that is very beneficial...you can google that if you ever need it...it was essential for us to do it to find the right basal rates.
     
  4. Melanie1216

    Melanie1216 Approved members

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    Thanks to both of you. Yes, we were trained last week on how to give insulin for snacks and to make meals more flexible. I was still just sticking with the 15 carbs or less snacks-not sure why , I guess I didn't want to have to give her an extra shot unless it was a special occasion. How often do you give insulin for snacks? Thanks!
     
  5. wilf

    wilf Approved members

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    If she keeps having lows, then she needs even less insulin.

    The blood sugar checks should be 2 hours after meals, never mind the snacks.

    This will get easier. Maybe get yourself a good reference book to start learning this for yourself, so you're not so dependent on the clinic.

    Good luck. :cwds:
     
  6. Kcbscrapper

    Kcbscrapper Approved members

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    We give insulin for all snacks as I have a teen boy, who eats a lot. Just remember to not correct on a snack if less than three hours from a prior correction,
    One thing that I realized after frantically searching for low/no carb options was that me trying not to give a shot was influencing how my son viewed them. When he saw me going out of the way to avoid the shot, it didn't fit with the way we were trying to teach him that shots were a necessity each time he ate, and not something he should try to avoid. I still have no carb options if he asks, but I don't offer them unless he specifically asks. When he is just thirsty and there is not going to be food he does usually go for water, g2 or crystal light.
     
    Last edited: Jun 20, 2013
  7. Meredithsmom

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    I also felt like my other 2 kids were getting the shaft. And I still do sometimes. I say our entire family has diabetes. Because it effects each one of us in different ways. Meredith gets the finger pokes and insulin, but Sydney and Holden have a crabby and tired mom who sometimes has to leave them high and dry to attend to their sister. But we try to do fun things, too. And now that they are older, I try to spend "diabetes free" time with the older 2.
     

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