- advertisement -

911 says...

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by bnmom, Jan 17, 2011.

  1. malyssa

    malyssa Approved members

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2008
    Messages:
    1,846
    As dangerous as it could be, I never use to wear my medical id. I hated the thing with a passion. I knew I should wear one, I just never did. So when it was time for me to go to college, my mom said that she wouldn't let me go (she wouldn't cosign my student loans :rolleyes:) unless I wore one. So we compromised. I had wanted a tattoo for a while, and she agreed that if I got some sort of medical tattoo that it was ok. So I did. I got "diabetic" in nice cursive on my left wrist. I'm not saying it's for everyone, but it works for me, and there's no way for me to ever forget it. Both my mom and I feel safer when I'm driving, and walking around on campus.

    And I talked to an EMT about it, and she said it's actually a smart idea for someone if they don't wear their medical id, and that emts actually look for medical tattoos now. She liked the idea so much that she was trying to convince her husband who has diabetes to get one as well. Not right for everyone, like I said, but it works for me. :)
     
  2. Brandi's mom

    Brandi's mom Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2009
    Messages:
    475
    I got these made for Brandi. She has worn them more often than anything else. Even though she only has one now and the rubber things are gone.

    [​IMG]

    The local army surplus store makes these and regular silver dog tags and they do it in like 2 minutes and they were only about $7.
     
  3. funnygrl

    funnygrl Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2005
    Messages:
    2,324
    I never said I agreed with that reasoning, just that it has been something I've heard. I don't wear medical ID all the time, but do when I'm out running errands and such.

    EMTs don't worry about "brain injury." They worry about airway, breathing, circulation. An IV will be started and some point if there's an accident, likely early on. Labs will be taken from this, for things like blood type and a hemoglobin if bleeding is a concern. These labs will include a glucose. They will all be run "stat". The glucose will be known quickly in such a scenario. Even if a person is not breathing/has no heart beat a glucose is done in this situation, at least in every code situation I've been in, even if the person is known not to be diabetic. Even if the glucose is terribly low, if someone were not breathing, that would still be more important.

    I do agree medical ID is a good idea, and can especially be important in the last scenario you mention.
     
  4. Kevin@My.Medical.ID

    Kevin@My.Medical.ID New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2011
    Messages:
    1
    I apologize if this post is against the forum rules... I checked the policies.
    I engrave IDs for kids quite often, type 1 and 2, and pumpers. I know it's hard to get the younger ones to want to wear something... or anything. That's why we try to provide IDs that are fun and colorful... yet still effective. Our most popular kids ID is the velcro bracelet shown under my signature. It's comes in 5 colors and has a large engraving area, and you don't have to remove it or turn it over to read the child's name and condition. Here is a close up of the tag so you can see what I'm talking about.
    [​IMG][​IMG]
     

Share This Page

- advertisement -

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice