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504 plan at a Catholic school?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by ROVERT81402, Jan 16, 2008.

  1. ROVERT81402

    ROVERT81402 Approved members

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    Does anyone know if Catholic schools have to accept a 504 plan?
    Also, can someone please point me in the direction of a good template.
    Thanks.
     
  2. Flutterby

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    if they take any federal funding they have to accept a 504 plan:)
     
  3. jendean

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    Most catholic schools will honor one because they want your cash...
    I hope yours does. I went to parochial school, (catholic) and would love to send my kids but our tuition is insane. IN SANE!!!
     
  4. Tamara Gamble

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    Go to www.diabetes.org and print sample 504. Also call 1-800-diabetes and ask for their discrimination package this contains alot of information that will be helpful for you. They only have to accomodate your child if they receive any federal funding, otherwise it's wishful thinking. I have had alot of parents pull their kids from Catholic schools because they have not enforced a 504. They could say okay we will do these things but if they don't you've got no backing. It has no strength to it. It is however a good idea to have everyone clear on what all of you agree upon as far as services for your child. Good luck to you.

    Tami
     
  5. CC'sMom

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    I wish I had an hour to reply to this thread! My daughter is in a Catholic school and it has been absolutely horrible! It really is a long story, but I asked for a 504 and was denied. The principal told me if I wanted to sue him and the school, to go right ahead. He has since "resigned." (Not because of us.) And, while it's not as nasty, it's not much better with the new principal. While I do think I have grounds to fight this, my daughter is feeling extremely uncomfortable and asked me to step back. This is her 8th grade year. She is going to a public high school in the fall. My son who is in 5th grade will also be moving to a public school then too. I'm heart broken. I see very little Christian attitude when it came to our situation....
     
  6. Laura

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    My son went to a Catholic school from Pre-k to 2nd grade. As soon as they heard me say 504 plan they got defensive. It's like they thought that meant I want a way to sue them or something. The first thing the principal told me was Catholic schools don't get federal funding so a 504 wouldn't hold up anyway. I hope you have better luck.
     
  7. Brensdad

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    Under the Americans with Disabilities Act, church-run schools and daycares are immune from having to make reasonable accommodation. We learned that the hard way.
     
  8. Twinklet

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    My kids go to a private Christian school and they do not honor 504 plans. In fact, they told the parents of a Kindergartener on a pump that they would not be responsible for any of her medical care. Girl had to move to a public school. Emily is self-sufficient (and has an awesome teacher) so we stay. Our public schools really suck.

    Emily has 2 D friends who go to a local Catholic school. There is no nurse and the school will not do a 504. However, the principal will not allow the girls to test in the classroom, they have to come to the office. No matter what.

    Most religious private schools do not take federal money and do not have to accept 504 plans. If your child is pretty self-sufficient, it may be OK. Otherwise you may have to consider public school.
     
  9. CC'sMom

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    I think given the right circumstances, it can be done. The first thing I would do is call the head of the all the Catholic schools in your dioceses. Ask them if the Catholic schools receive federal funding (ours does). Then I’d start at the top. Go to the Monsignor of the church. Tell him what you need and why. In fact, I think I’d have a meeting with the Monsignor and the principal at the same time.

    There was a girl in our school a year older then my daughter that did have a 504 in place. It was signed by the previous principal who had retired the year before my daughter was diagnosed. The new principal wouldn’t sign one for me. So it depends on who’s running the show. That’s why I feel you need the Monsignor in your court. Of course, in our dioceses they only have a 12 year term, so I’d find out when he’s leaving too.

    Another thing to do is call your state representative. There maybe laws in Ohio that are on your side. I’m in Pennsylvania and there is a law now in committee that would have helped us greatly. Unfortunately by the time it’s signed into law, my daughter will probably be in college.

    I guess you have to decide how much of a fight it’s worth. Look at Lindy (Nicky), a public school asking her to change her son’s pump??? So you can run into road blocks anywhere. It just depends how much sweat and tears you want to put into it. But the one thing I did learn, is there is no way my child will ever go to another school without a 504 in place. Things change, people in positions of power change, you need to be protected, no matter what.
     
  10. ROVERT81402

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    When we signded Trevor up for school, we applied for a scholorship and got it. They paid for half of his tuition. Does that mean they are federal funded? His school is really great, they haven't given us a problem yet,,,knock on wood. (Other than the incident yesterday, but I think they just don't know that he shouldn't walk by himself when feeling funny.) His principal even came up to the hospital to see him when he was dxd! And it was only 3 weeks into school, so its not like she "knew" him. I just hate to ask about a 504 and have them get all defensive and stop being so "nice" and understanding. Trevor is not self sufficiant. He can check himself, but he hasn't grasped what a low number or a high number is. It really makes me nervous with him going outside for recess too, because they have parents come in and volunteer time to watch them. They were told at the beginning that whoever was out with him, had to know what to do, but what if they don't? What if he needs his glucagon and its in the nurse's office, and nobody knows what to do?!
    Oh man, maybe I will just look into home schooling him!
    Thanks for all your responses.
     
  11. Ali

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    It really depends on the private school. We had great luck with a Catholic school for one of our kids that needed extra care/help. It was not legally required for the school but they worked with us. Think it just really depends on the school-like the public ones-but you have no legal way of forcing most disability issues with private schools. Ali
     
  12. Tamara Gamble

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    If the school is willing to take care of him there is no need to push for a 504 given that it is a private institution. Don't give up yet. You may not have a 504 but you may be in a wonderful possition with loving people. That is better than what a 504 can give you.

    Tami
     
  13. Amy C.

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    I wanted Philip to attend a religious private school -- Lutheran in this case. I know they let certain children know that this was not the best school for them when they had learning disabilities. I did all I could be be pleasant about what they needed to let Philip do or to do for him concerning his diabetes.

    I would approach any situation with -- for Philip to remain healthy, this should happen.

    This usually worked. The only thing they wouldn't do is give the injections. Philip learned how to inject when he was 8 -- the adult would verify the amount, but Philip had to do the injection.

    When he was 12, he started doing all his own care. I use it as a training ground for him to do this. He makes mistakes (forgetting to test or bolus), but they are usually corrected when he gets home.
     
    Last edited: Jan 18, 2008

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