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2 year old fighting MDIs--Any Suggestions?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by aidensmom, Jun 19, 2008.

  1. aidensmom

    aidensmom Approved members

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    My DS has had d for a little over 3 months now :( At first he did ok with the injections (he's getting 4/day), but lately we have been having a real struggle. We go to the endo next week. I'm just wondering if anyone has any suggestions on any products that might make the injections less frightening/painful. I thought I'd just see what you guys had to say. If there are products out there that would be helpful I want to be able to ask my endo about them. Thanks so much!
     
  2. moco89

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    The iport, but insurance typically does not cover it :(. My parents used to give me stickers when I was little, and when I got enough-they gave me a present like a bouncy ball or something.

    http://www.pattonmd.com/

    Apparently about 100 health insurance companies cover it http://www.diabetesmine.com/2007/06/the_other_iport.html, but I read online on my health insurance company's website that it's not covered.
     
    Last edited: Jun 19, 2008
  3. Judy&Alli

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    I don't have a product that I could think of but Alli blew bubbles during her shots. Bubbles are dirt cheap and it seems to keep their minds off the ouchie!
    Oh good luck it is harder I think when you have such a little one! Hugs to you and Aiden!!!!!!!
    Judy:)
     
  4. mom2two

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    Not sure I will be much help but my son went through the same exact thing at about 3-4 months into it. It's almost like he was saying I am sick of this stop, lol! He is much better now and did go through that phase for about a month. Of course he still has his days but they aren't often.
     
  5. Jensmami

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    I like the bubbles suggestion. All though my dd was much older, she still was scared and did not want the shots. She needed to hold on to her favorite stuffed animal, and we did put on a tv show she liked.
     
  6. Christopher

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    There is a product called Inject-Ease that hides the syringe and needle. Just a thought....:cwds:

    http://www.palcolabs.com/section_products/injectease.html

    It's about $25.00 but reusable. I have heard people say they found them on E-Bay for less money.

    For the pain, you can try putting an ice cube on the injection site to numb it before you give the shot.
     
    Last edited: Jun 19, 2008
  7. albasmom

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    we had the same problem. We used something called Insuflon. It is like a canula that you insert with a needle. We did it in the butt. It has a silicone membrane that you give the shot through with the pen. Then he won't feel the shot at all. The needle is pretty long, but we used emla. It lasts for 3-4 days. I don't know if you can get it in the US. We got a prescription for it, because she was so afraid of the shots.
     
  8. moco89

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    Basically it's the same thing as the iport :). Infusulon is manufactured by unomedical (the pump infusion set company).
     
  9. Charmed7

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    I was going to suggest the inject-ease.

    Sometimes it's mind over matter, which you can't rightly explain to a young one. But some suggestions:

    Have them choose a spot (out of two spots) which will set them up to accept the shot. This can back fire, so be careful. But you can ask, "Do you want it in your arm or butt?"

    Have them take 4 deep breathes. On the exhale of the fourth shot, give the injection. Practice the deep breathes without the syringe. This increases the oxygen and reduces the pain slightly.

    There's a teddy bear (someone chime in if you know more about it) that has "injection" site patches on it. You can use it as a model for your child. If teddy gets a shot, then you get a shot...

    Give them something to do while it's shot time. Watch TV, read a book, sing a song, count things. Maybe incorporate some alone time just you and the child before the shot. Also, you might want to set up a safe place for shot time. Changing rooms may add stress to the shot time.

    Talk to your child during a down time about how the shots make them feel. Are you afraid of them? What else are you afraid of. And say things like, It's ok to be afraid. I'm afraid sometimes too. Validate their feelings.

    My son was 4 when he was diagnosed. I know 2 is different, but you can adjust some of these things to fit your child.

    Good luck
    Charmed
     
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  10. mjtjmcouch

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    shot blocker

    I got this handy device from another cwd member. It is called a shot blocker. I haven't been able to find them but they are made by bionex. My son loves it. I'm not sure if it actually does anything but for him it does.
     
  11. Christopher

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    He is called Rufus (there is a female version too) and we got our Rufus when Danielle was in the hospital at dx. Danielle didn't really take well to poor Rufus, she called him Rufus the Doofus. :eek: But anyway, many kids really love the bear. Here is the info:

    http://www.childrenwithdiabetes.com/d_06_c20.htm
     
    Last edited: Jun 19, 2008
  12. Mom2Will

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    my pediatrician gave us a "shot blocker" (little plastic thing shaped like a "C", it has little "sticky" things on one side that you place on the skin and supposedly takes the mind off the actual injection, insert the needle in the opening of the "C") Will didn't/doesn't care one way or another, if you want I'll send it to you just send me a pm with your address
     
  13. CButler

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    I'm glad to hear there are some devices out there to aid in this problem. My DD as a 5 year old fought us for 6 months BUT she has Sensory Processing Disorder and has problems with the way things feel. We always had to have two people at home for shot time; one to give it, and one to hold her. I hope you find something that works.
     
  14. TracieandJim

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    Hmm. Everyone has some good suggestions. Have you approached the mental angle yet? Does he know when its time or when its coming? Does he see the syringe? Do you say 'its time for a shot' or something to that nature? On occassion DS will see us coming and he runs off screaming but I walk normally and grab him (I know sounds horrible). But we have him in front of us between our legs. We are not holding him down but holding him securely, like a hug if you will. Then we will up his pant leg, or shirt, or sleeve, and stick him. Sometimes he says ouch but he usually runs off to play and rubs the spot we poked him. We dont hide it from him ever but we dont make a big deal about it. Im not suggesting hiding the needle but maybe play it down so he doesnt think its a big deal?

    With our older DS, we have finally gotten him used to occassional bs checks by not saying a word and taking his hand and just doing it. Now hes actually excited and wants to see his 'number'. Then he runs through the house saying his number.

    Just a thought.
     
  15. soulsfr

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    shoot throught the clothing-it takes out the sting!

    i also think that the teddy bear is a good thing too-have the 2 yr old give the bear a shot and snuggle it afterwards.
     
  16. chocoholicsc

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    Wow, you've gotten some really great ideas here.
    One thing we did for Christopher was to make up a 'toy' pokey bag. We used an extra meter that we're not going to use, some strips to go with, cotton balls and a syringe with no needle (I put a scooby-doo bandaid around the top of it so that when it was laying on the floor I would know it was part of his toy pokey-kit). Then when it was time for me to check his sugar and do his pokey, Christopher would pick a stuffed animal (and some times a matchbox car) to check their sugar also. It seemed to help to know that he got to play with the things we use on him.
    Mostly though, we just insisted that he was going to get his pokey (We told him it would make his belly feel better) and that it was not negotiable. We tried to be firm, but loving. Diabetes is so hard and it's especially heartwrenching if you have to struggle with your little one.
    I hope that this is a very short-lived phase and that something one of us has suggested helps!

    Candy
     
  17. Aidan'sMom

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    I am going through the same thing with Aidan these days, also three months after dx. It's like he sees a syringe and runs off. He cries and kicks and screams sometimes if he knows I am going to give an injection anywhere other than the backs of his arms. It is awful!! I have been singing a song during and then after it is done making a big fuss and jumping up and yelling YAY Aidan!! He likes that!! Probably because Mommy looks like a big dork!! Oh well!! It makes him smile!!:D
     
  18. Emma'sDad

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    Emma did exactly the same thing.. "Ok, I've had enough of this. NO MORE... NEEEEVVVEEEERRRR!!!!" Must be one of the different stages of acceptance once Dx. The only thing we could do is pin her down and give it to her until she realized it wasn't that bad and only takes 5 seconds if she just let us do it instead of drawing it out 45 minutes.
     
  19. yeswe'rebothD

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    That's about how Grace was. She went through it much more quickly though, while still in the hospital (and we were only there just over 40 hours, since she didn't have ketones and because of our previous experience with my D). For most of the day we were there, she was picking over her food since she knew there was an injection waiting for her after eating.

    Finally, before dinner I said to her, "you're going to get the insulin, so you might as well eat what you want and then we'll just do the shot; get it over with." She never hesitated to eat her meal again. I'm sure part of her acceptance came from both her age at dx (5) and her seeing me dealing with my D, but she also had never seen me do injections, I'd been pumping for her whole life.

    Later when some shots or site changes were hurting her, I'd have the same type of discussion. She'd want to cry a bunch and I'd remind her it was ok, but not to carry on. She quickly understood that it was much easier to be compliant and have it hurt for a few minutes, than to fight and have a painful injection or infusion site.

    HTH, and I hope it is a quick phase that will pass for you soon!
     
  20. Charmed7

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    If it were me and my child (they are all soooo different) I would probably let him run off and I would patiently wait for him to return. Maybe start dinner and talk to your husband about how you miss Aidan and wish he would eat dinner with you. Sort of let him come to you on his own accord. If you go running after him, your giving him more reason to continue the behavior, then to change it. And if you get mad at his reaction, that can mess with a kids head big time. Almost as if it's the kids fault he has diabetes and it makes mommy mad etc. My kid's head is trippy like that, so I have to be aware of all my verbal and physical reactions (no eye rolling at high numbers etc.) Being a goof ball after the shot is the best. Include him in it. "Lets do a happy dance, give me five!" Things like that. It's a phase, you just have to help him through and over it as painlessly as possible.

    Charmed
     

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