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10 yr old daughter dx 11/22/09

Discussion in 'Introductions' started by kileesmama, Nov 27, 2009.

  1. kileesmama

    kileesmama New Member

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    Nov 27, 2009
    Messages:
    4
    Hi Everyone,

    I am just looking to connect with other parents who are facing the issues as us. I found out my daughter had type 1 diabetes this last sunday. We spent 4 days in peds icu and she was released the day before thanksgiving. She is really having a hard time accepting/understanding/dealing with her dx. She asks me why did she have to get this? Everyday she says her life is sucky cuz she has this. I try to reassure her that it is going to be ok and it will get easier. The whole family has changed what we eat so we eat the same things she does. If anyone has any suggestions to help her get through this intial period I would really appreciate it. I also was wondering why her sugar levels are the highest in the am before she eats?
    Thanks
    April
     
  2. linda

    linda Approved members

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    Hi-so sorry you have to join us, but welcome!!..there is a great family here for support or just to vent or be friends!!.It is tough adjusting in the beginning, but you must assure your daughter her life will continue to be filled with all of the great things she did before, just a little different!! I dont want to overwhelm you with questions, in time you will get all of the answers you need. There are so many ways to improve her day to day living, it is new to you, but soon you can consider the pump. Why and how did you change your diet?? Please dont restrict her. You will be welcomed by sooo many family members here. Come often. Again welcome. ((((hugs)))))
     
  3. sassypantz

    sassypantz Approved members

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    Nov 11, 2009
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    My 11 yr old was dx'd in Sept., so we're just a couple of months ahead of you. This is all so fresh for you, you're bound to have tons of questions and not even the first clue where to look for answers.

    Just remember, as you read here, that every family here is in a different stage of their D management. Make sure you follow your doctor's advice, and don't be shy about calling their office for guidance while you're still learning the ropes.

    Just as an example: we left the hospital with a script for Humulin N & R, and were just getting comfortable with the process when we saw the endocrinologist for the first time, and he switched us to a Levimir and Humalog, with different dosages--which meant we had to start from scratch with our expecations about bg numbers and such. After about a week, I had to call him and ask him to adjust the dosage because we had too many high readings. Then after 30 days it was time to refill the script, but our insurance wouldn't cover Levimir, so we had to switch to Lantus and Humalog, and watch for differences in numbers with THAT. It feels like we'll never feel anything close to NORMAL!

    Those first few days out of the hospital are scary! I remember bringing DD home as an infant and thinking, "I can't believe they think I know how to take care of an infant!"--and here I was with that feeling all over again! "I can't believe they think I know how to take care of a diabetic pre-teen!!"

    Be patient, be observant, and be good to yourself.

    Your DD is bound to go through some stages of grief, as is everyone in the family. Don't be surprised if everything seems fine for a few days and then out of nowhere she's in a total rage or extremely upset... it's all part of the process of accepting it. Just keep reminding her that it isn't her fault, it didn't happen as a result of a bad diet, or being a bad kid, or anything else like that, it was just one of those random things that happened, but that you'll always always always be right by her side to help her deal with it in every way possible, because that's what families do. And then keep your promise.
     
  4. carcha

    carcha Approved members

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    Hi April, my daughter was diagnosed about 2 1/2 months ago at age 11 and I can relate very well to your questions and concerns. If you have a diabetes team that includes a social worker or psychologist, perhaps your daughter can talk to him/her and have an outlet for all of these emotions she's experiencing since her diagnosis. And we've done the same thing as you - the whole family eats the same things, as we are currently on a very inflexible plan of carbs for each meal and snack that we were given at the hospital. I know how hard things are for you right now, and I'm sending lots of positive vibes your way. Hang in there!
     
  5. kileesmama

    kileesmama New Member

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    Nov 27, 2009
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    we havent restricted what she can eat we have just adjusted the amount she eats. the dr has her on 45g carbs for meals and 15g carbs for snacks. He did make an exception for thanksgiving dinner but since her levels are still high (300's in am and 160-280 at night) he wants to keep her on this until we get a little better #'s.
     
  6. Lisa P.

    Lisa P. Approved members

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    If they haven't told you already (sometimes doctors keep the info shorter because it can be overwhelming) you reach a point where you are measuring carbs and insulin and, especially on the pump or if your kid tolerates shots well, you will not have the food schedule you have now (unless you choose to). Her life will be different with diabetes, but it will not be as different as it is right now. It may help her to know that, her world is not permanently upside down.

    Also, high blood sugar really messes with how you feel. Part of why she's feeling so rotten about all this may be simply because she's feeling rotten. I have a sister in law who has horrible back problems and has had for years. Being in chronic pain is something that she has adjusted to and compensates for, so that she acts as if she's fine. But she's not, she's hurting or fuzzy all the time, and it really affects her emotions. I hope for you that once you get in a good place with this and she's feeling better physically, her emotions will brighten, also. Not that there isn't a lot to deal with, but it's harder to deal with difficulties when you feel bad.

    Hang in there, best of luck to you.
     
  7. Becky Stevens mom

    Becky Stevens mom Approved members

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    Hi April and welcome to the family:) I am so very sorry about your daughters diagnosis but you will find lots of support here. Does your daughter know that Nick Jonas has type 1 diabetes? I know its very scary for her right now. Are there other CWD at her school? My son was the only one for 3 years then another child was diagnosed last year. As far as foods nobody has to change their diet because of diabetes. Your daughter can eat anything she wants as long as you give insulin for it.

    If shes having highs in the morning it may mean that her basal insulin needs to be raised. Your endo should be able to advise you about that. Are they having you call in for awhile with numbers to give you different insulin dosages? Dont hesitate to call them day or night, thats what they are there for and they really dont mind. No question is stupid. Join us in the parents chatroom if you like
     
  8. kileesmama

    kileesmama New Member

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    Nov 27, 2009
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    Kilee is the only child in her school with diabetes. I'm a little nervous if the school staff will be able to accommodate her needs. I know its a law that they have to but my head keeps going to what if they don't and something happens to her at school. We are having to call the dr with numbers and he is still adjusting her insulin. I will ask about the basal insulin. Thank you for the information
     
  9. 2type1s

    2type1s Approved members

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    Nov 23, 2008
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    Just wanted to say a quick WELCOME! This is all so new, and you will read lots of stuff on here that might make your head spin right now. I learned new things after finding this site after my oldest had been dx'd 9 years! Give your daughter permission to be mad and sad. It does suck. Do the same for yourself. Try to find another family to connect with, maybe through your local JDRF chapter or your clinic. It helped Morgan to meet an older girl with D to look up to. Then daycamps and overnight camps changed her life completely. Take it slow, ask lots of questions and give lots of hugs to each other.
     

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