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10 Things Your Endo Never Told You.

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Christopher, Jan 4, 2012.

  1. MomofSweetOne

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    I'd completely forgotten about worrying about warm baths and swimming after reading Pink Panther. This is a YDMV. My daughter loves long hot soak baths in the tub, and the ultimate for her is if she can convince me to bring her crepes in the tub. We bolus her for the food and an hour of basal right before she gets in and haven't had any problems...even when I've forgotten she was bolussed 30 minutes prior.:eek:
     
  2. 3kidlets

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    That one shot of Lantus does not work for all children - especially long, lean, muscular people. You will probably have to split the dose in half and give twice a day, or else your child will end up with some pretty big highs!
     
  3. mom2Hanna

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    What!! I never thought of that!
     
  4. mommylovestosing

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    I may compile all of these and give it to my endo...

    If someone is already doing this please let me know so I don't reinvent the wheel!

    I'll also add that brown rice is one of the hardest things for us to dose. When she was 1st diagnosed we got our first very low from it. It doesn't take as much as you think to cover it - even after minus-ing the fiber.

    Also - hubby made a HUGE mistake with microwave popcorn. LOOK AT THE LABEL CAREFULLY!! Popcorn, when popped, doesn't have many carbs. But un-popped it DOES and the labels show that first. It's only at the bottom that is gives you the "1/2C popped popcorn has..." info... DO NOT bolus for 27G for 4 cups of popcorn!!
     
  5. ashtensmom

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    NatCat: Thank you. Your post is reassuring to me in that not all lows overnight will result in seizure/coma... that our bodies can protect itself. May I ask what kind of a "high" number you're talking about? What # are you waking up with when you rebound from a low? Thx.
     
  6. DsMom

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    Oh yeah...I REALLY wish they would have told me that my son would not pass out if he hit 70! They never said he WOULD, but I remember feeling so freaked out if his BG got below 80 and feeling like I could not get the glucose into him fast enough. I know this varies, and for some that a 70 can produce marked symptoms...but I think docs need to emphasize that there is no "cliff" at 70 that your child will tumble off of and that these things are gradual. My son will feel "shaky" in the 40s, but he is perfectly coherent and awake. My adult niece says she has easily treated herself even in the 20s! I'm sure this is not true for everyone, but I wish docs would emphasize the big variability in how people react to lows.
     
  7. emm142

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    I have also treated myself in the 20s and below (when the meter just said LO). And I was also freaked by BGs in the 60s when I was newly dx'd.
     
  8. Christopher

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    What you are describing are what some people call "rebounds", going very low and then your body corrects for it. Without derailing my own thread, I just wanted to say that this is not a "proven" fact.

    Apparently it does happen with some people, and members here have seen it happen, so I am not discounting it. I just don't want people to think that if their child goes really low that their body will automatically protect them. It doesn't always do that.

    I personally have never seen a rebound in the 5 years I have been dealing with this. When Danielle wakes up high it is either hormones, what she ate for dinner, Dawn Phenomena, or just because it is Wednesday...:eek:
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2012
  9. Lee

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    This actually has happened to me - the first time it took me three months to catch it, the last time it took me only 3 days:
    http://forums.childrenwithdiabetes.com/showthread.php?t=56575&highlight=rebounds

    And with that, 3am is not a magic time. Now I mix up my nighttime checks and have atleast one at 2am and one at 4am a week.

    I also don't want people to think they can rely on the rebound. Coco has also had multiple seizures. It happens and it sucks.
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2012
  10. mmgirls

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    That Lantus DOES have a peak with some people.

    Younge children may have a natuarl rise once in deep sleep, even a long afternoon nap.

    CGM

    Apidra

    The reasoning behind the changes in I:C and basal.

    Basal testing

    Fat/protein spikes

    The disparity in D care, even in the same city/state.

    The list can be very long.
     
  11. bnmom

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    Omigosh yes! Bobby first few weeks after the hospital, I would practically catapult over the counter to get to the juice boxes if I saw a 70. Scared if I could get him treated before he passed out or something. :eek:
     
  12. MamaBear

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    I tell you 70s bother me a lot less since experiencing 27 and "LO".

    We were actually told by an RN while still in PICU that glucagon is for anything under 60, and that anything under 60 is an emergency. I was so panicked and confused when either our first or second night home he hit a 32. He was awake and I treated him fine with either juice or soda (cannot recall and don't feel like finding what I posted here that night). So here I was wondering exactly how I am supposed to know when it's appropriate to use glucagon instead of juice,candy,tabs,etc. I know now of course that it is for when he is unable to ingest sugar on his own, or if he has passed out, but thankfully neither has happened and I have never had to use it.
     
  13. dqmomof3

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    What a great thread! Here are a couple of additional ones from us...

    1. The existence of phenergan gel. This stuff is amazing when a stomach bug makes its appearance. You can purchase it at a compounding pharmacy (with a prescription.) Insurance doesn't cover it, but it's only about $6 for three doses. It goes on the inside of the wrists, and rubs in completely. It's good for six months, so you do have to remember to replace it twice a year if you don't use it.

    2. When your D child is throwing up, do NOT turn off the insulin pump or skip the basal shot. The body neds insulin even if the child isn't eating.
     
  14. mmgirls

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    This with the fact that LARGE Ketones can happen with a normal/low BG!!!

    OUr first tummy bug with lower than normal numbers and feeding the insulin, I was shocked when I tested for ketones and founde that they where large.

    TEST for ketones when hings are not going well, whether it be excessivly high or LOW numbers.
     
  15. 2type1s

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    # ? Don't know what number we're at, but diabetes math does not always add up. In fact, it usually doesnt! You can do everything by the book, and still have wonky numbers. I quit saying a number was "bad" or "good" a LONGGGGGG time ago. It's just information to deal with now!
     
  16. NatCat

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    I would go to bed at around 100 or even lower sometimes, and then wake up in the 300 range, sometimes even higher. It was mind boggling. I had no idea that this could even happen. I'm thankful that my liver was doing this though, or who knows what could have happened? :cwds:
     
  17. NatCat

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    Oh yes, I totally agree with you. I should have mentioned that this isn't always the case. By no means rely in a rebound to bring your child up from a low, because as you said it doesn't always do it.

    Thank you for the correction, it can definitely be dawn phenomena or hormones, I guess I just got carried away talking about my own experience. :eek:

    I definitely don't want to be leading anybody astray. :eek:
     
  18. nanhsot

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    I do want to say, however, that without fairly regular night time testing, you have no way of knowing if you experienced a rebound or a strong dawn phenomenon. My son can easily go to bed at or near 100 and wake at or near 300 if his basals are off. He has a STRONG rise at 5am and his basals need to be nearly double at night as compared to daytime. We know without a doubt that his was a strong rise and NOT a rebound via Dexcom and/or night testing. I've documented many strong rises and only one possible rebound in 2 years. The rebound is suspicious and I believe was artifact actually.

    Not saying you are NOT rebounding. Just saying that some simple night time basal testing may be in order for you. I wouldn't want this to go unchecked. In theory if you rebound frequently you use up the stores of sugar in the liver, so it's not something you want happening with regularity, and in theory if you do rebound you need to run high for a few days to restock the liver.
     
  19. mmgirls

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    Until we got CGM, I was scared to be overly aggressive with night numbers but was doubfounded by them.

    As it turns out, my DD has a GREAT rise once fully asleep. Doubling if not more her daytime basal.

    I do counter that with ONE known occurance of a rebound, but my dd has also had more than a few below 40 numbers in the last 6 years that did not 'rebound" on thier own.
     
  20. mom2Hanna

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    Hanna was actually in a study to test her "glucagon response". She had an iv in each arm, one with glucose and one with insulin. They stabilized her bg at 90 and then took her to 60 for an hour or so. They tested her bg every 5 mins to see if her body was trying to correct the low. Hanna does have an active glucagon response but it cannot be relied upon and most peoplewith diabetes lose the response because it is a relationship in the pancreas between beta cells and without insulin production there is nothing to tell the body to respond. It was a fascinating experience though.
     

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