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10 Things Your Endo Never Told You.

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Christopher, Jan 4, 2012.

  1. Mommy For Life

    Mommy For Life Approved members

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    LOVE THIS THREAD! Bumping up for our newbie families. :cwds:
     
  2. faithfaery7

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    I am SO thankful for this thread. I think I'll be sending my hubby this way so he can read through everything too.

    You guys are so wonderful and I am so so thankful I found this forum
     
  3. msschiel

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    Bumping this up for the newbies.
     
  4. njswede

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    #4711: If there's any way you can get a CGM through insurance, paying out of pocket, begging, selling a kidney, whatever, DO IT! It gives you peace of mind but also reveals problems you had no idea about. Get it! Now!
     
  5. Theo's dad Joe

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    Yea I was misinformed on this one: told to not stack doses within 3-4 hours but they didn't tell me that I could do it for a meal or snack within that time frame. It actually turned out to be something that has worked really well. My son tends to peak late like 2 1/2 to 3 1/2 hours after lunch or even dinner, but if he gets a prebolus for a snack or treat at the 2 hour mark it helps take down that late peak, and the smaller snack or treat tends to not create as big a peak.

    At least it worked for a big slice of NY style pizza. He got the pizza bolus and was only really starting to come up around 2 hours, so he got a small bolus for half an ice cream sandwich and it turned down that pizza peak and the second peak wasn't bas either.

    I was told that 2 15 gram snacks a day, uncovered, between meals was a GREAT idea. I think it is horrible.
    Also, the instructions I was given to treat anything under 70 was basically 30 grams of uncovered carbs: 15 juice, retest and then 15 MORE in the form of a slower digesting snack. Plus you may be rebounding if you are eating when very low.
     
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2015
  6. Theo's dad Joe

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    People may disagree on this one but with CGM, don't watch it happen too much. Set the alarms, and maybe set an alarm on your phone to check and see what happened at 3 hours. If you watch it during a period when you are not going to do anything about the numbers anyway then it is just draining.
     
  7. Mimikins

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    I experienced the exact same thing, and it was the reason why I ended up being diagnosed in the first place. I was stupid and overlooked my diabetes symptoms as stress, went to see my hair stylist for a cut, went to the local urgent care after she urged me to get checked out (my hair was badly falling out, and she was thinking it was a thyroid issue), and was rushed to the ER less than a half hour later for DKA.

    I've seen this a few times in this thread, but I've noticed that protein can spike me up at much as carbs within certain foods (high-protein low-carb foods and some restaurant meals are guilty of this). A container of greek yogurt could be 6g of carbs, but I might need to bolus for 12g and do a 2-3 hour dual wave to offset the protein spike (I typically follow the fat-protein-unit method).
     
  8. MomofSweetOne

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    I agree with you. Too much checking leads to burn-out. I've also noticed that when I'm sleep-deprived I tend to check it more. Otherwise, it's in the background and lets us know when we need to pay attention to D.
     
  9. MomofSweetOne

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    Some of the worst advice I've been given was on a night call with a pump failure. I called in and said I didn't want to use Lantus, that I wanted to bolus basal every two hours through the night until the new pump arrived. The CDE on call told me I was being dangerous, that giving insulin more than every four hours was stacking insulin. When I tried explaining that I was going to give her 3 units every two hours plus corrections as needed rather than the 1.6 units per hour she usually got by pump, he got upset, said he didn't know our case, etc. I was dumbfounded that a CDE at a major children's hospital could be so clueless as to not understand that the pump is giving insulin constantly, that we know the rate it was giving each hour, and could replicate it via syringe. Despite being "dangerous", her BGs stayed between 100 & 200 all night long. :triumphant: And the new pump even arrived an hour early the next morning.
     
  10. mamaberkhie

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    This didn't work for us either. Our first endo always blamed us for DS' high sugars (we were always doing something wrong) but never considered that everyone responds differently andmaybe the diet regimen wasn't working for him. New endo changes the uncovered snacks and we are good.
     
  11. jenm999

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    I've learned is that our endocrinologists are very, very smart people, but without parenting a child with T1 they don't really know what it's like to manage on a day-to-day basis.
     

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