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10 Things Your Endo Never Told You.

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Christopher, Jan 4, 2012.

  1. Christopher

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    It seems like there are a lot of newly dx parents here lately and it got me thinking about all the things that I found out on my own that the Endo never mentioned. So maybe we could make a list. :cwds:

    #1. Do not have your child take a hot bath after getting a dose of insulin (long acting or short). The hot water may cause the insulin to be absorbed quicker, causing a low. Wait at least 2 hours.
     
  2. Flutterby

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    That there is a BLOOD ketone meter.
     
  3. zoomom456

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    #2) Lantus stings/burns - for my son cold Lantus burned the worst.
    #3) Insulin vials can be left out at room temperature for 28 days
     
  4. Beach bum

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    One of the best tools to have in your arsenal is a good scale. Weighing vs measuring makes for a more accurate carb count which means more accurate dosing.
     
  5. AJMom

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    Thank you!

    Being newly diagnosed (11.23.11) this type of info is really helpful! Thank you so very much! We are still awash in all the newness and learning involved!:)
     
  6. bnmom

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    That there are smaller, thinner needles that make shots less painful
     
  7. Jordansmom

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    15 carbs in 15 minutes may not work for your child. 15 carbs can sometimes be too much for a mild low. You should find out how many points 1 carb raises your child's bg and do the math based on the actual bg. Sometimes it takes 20+ minutes to see a rise in bg, so try to be patient and don't over treat.

    Uncovered snacks (especially bedtime snacks) may not be a good idea for your child, even if they are honeymooning.

    Don't correct adrenalin highs with a full correction.
     
  8. MamaC

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    There are syringes measured in 1/2 units.

    Insulin can be diluted.

    (Add "hot shower" to Chris' hot bath tip.)
     
  9. MomofSweetOne

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    That Think Like A Pancreas is the most awesome book for parents to learn how they're determining doses, etc. I hated the feeling of not knowing how to care for my child without their adjustments. I highly recommend the book when I talk with newly diagnosed families.

    That it is possible to have the 911 system alerted that there is an insulin-dependent Type 1 child in the home and to come prepared to deal with diabetes.
     
  10. Amy C.

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    You cannot control diabetes. You manage it the best you can.
    You are doing well if half the readings fall into the range your endo gives you.
     
  11. L101418

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    Blood ketone meter!

    That a 15g correction is not necessary for every low. A BG of 78 might need only 6g to put you right where you want. (I know this seems obvious but my brain was mush.)
     
  12. lynn

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    There is absolutely no equation that equals "controlled diabetes".

    A lot can happen overnight so, even if the endo says you don't have to check your child's blood sugar at night, you should consider checking around 2am anyway.
     
  13. Ndiggs

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    Overnight when giving carbs, they can take longer to absorb is they are in a deep sleep when you wake them up. We usually recheck at 25 minutes overnight

    Cold insulin gets more air bubbles when filling shots and cartridges

    Levimier/Lantus can be split if it does not last 24 hours in your little one
     
  14. Beach bum

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    That the meter/lancet they send you home with is not the end all be all. It is not written in stone that you have to use that particular brand meter, or size lancet.

    This one your doctor definitely won't tell you:
    If you don't jive with your doc, you don't have to stick with them. It's ok to shop around for one that best fits your style.
    We were assigned to a specific practice. When I called to make the appointment I wasn't overly thrilled with the attitude of the receptionist and the nurse I had to talk to, and the fact that they wouldn't see us for 2 months! Called our ped and asked him flat out, if you were in my position, where would you go, and he told me what we wanted to hear (the clinic our friend was going to).

    Glucose and juice do not need to be the main things to bring up a blood sugar. We had to get creative as my daughter did not care for either. Fruit leather, fruit snacks, Gogurts, drinkable yogurt, and of course...candy!

    Lantus stings. Make sure to let it come to room temp before administering if it's been in the fridge. If it still stings, Levimere is another option.

    Diabetes affects the entire family. While we focus on the child who has diabetes, we have to remember that it has an impact on the siblings. They are afraid too, they have questions. Spouses may be freaked out too, and afraid to care for the child for fear of hurting them. Talk! Get out your fears. Don't keep it bottled up. Trust me on this one.

    Diabetes is a team effort. I've seen many posts here about spouses who are not totally on board when it comes to care of the child. No matter how much or how little the other parent participates, you have to have another trained person on board. If your significant other isn't on board, talk to them about it.

    Bribery may be necessary in the early days of diagnosis. Seriously, I did just about anything to get through the days without having my daughter hide under the bed!

    These are all things I learned here:cwds:
     
  15. Becky Stevens mom

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    Do whats best for your CWD and family. Not what others are doing for theirs. If MDI is what youre all comfortable with and its working, dont let anyone, including the endo convince you that your child HAS to go on the pump.

    Dont panic over high blood sugars. What goes up, must come down;)

    Dont let the school tell you how your CWD diabetes is going to be managed while they are there. It is up to you and your diabetes team to tell them how things are going to be done. If your child goes to public school, they should be eligible for a 504. Some schools will try to convince parents otherwise, whether its out of ignorance of the law or not wanting to have to make accommidations. They have to comply with the law.

    The A1C really is just another tool in the diabetes tool box:cwds:
     
  16. Darryl

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    There is a thing called a CGM.
     
  17. caspi

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    We were never told about the blood ketone meter. I had to fight the CDE to give me an rx for it. :rolleyes:

    Checking BG at night was something we were told only to do if we were making a change. :eek:
     
  18. mysweetwill

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    Thank you for this post and please keep them coming!! We learned #1 the hard way, our son almost passed out after his shower taken soon after insulin on Thanksgiving, 2 weeks after diagnosis. Our (first) endo also failed to mention that insulin needed to be refrigerated, after diagnosis we filled the prescriptions and in all the fog left the CVS bag on the dining room table for days (we were using the pens given to us that day). What a waste!:eek:
     
  19. lgouldin

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    On MDI you can only correct a high BG like every 4 hours (You don't want to stack insulin) .... but you can cover carbs anytime:D.

    So having a kid that wants to eat 4 small meals a day rather than 3 big meals is still possible.... or having a piece of pie or cake in between meals is still possible!

    Yep, that little tidbit of info would have been nice coming from the Endo on day 1...but I found it on here;)
     
  20. Amy C.

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    Absolutely on this one -- correct only every 3-4 hours, but always give insulin for the food eaten, no matter what time. (if on a long acting/fast acting regime - rules are different for NPH)

    Many, many people have this wrong.
     

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