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10 months and another first

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by tiger7lady, Dec 10, 2010.

  1. tiger7lady

    tiger7lady Approved members

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    So the nurse calls me this afternoon. Vincent was on the playground before lunch and he felt low. He came to her office ALONE! She said he was incoherent and when she took his BG it just registered "LO". We've never had that reading before. We have the freestyle lite and so he had to have been below 20 to just get a LO. She had him chug a juice and sent the secretary to get his lunch. She then had him eat it in her office and dosed him 1/2 unit less after he was done eating. He told her he was banging on the doors outside (because they are locked) to be let in. There is a buzzer next to the door that he could have pushed to be let in but he was too out of it to remember to push it. Since the doors are locked one of the aides had to of unlocked the door for him - which brings up my question of WHY IN THE H*LL DID HE WALK ACROSS THE WHOLE SCHOOL TO THE NURSE ALONE?! I've talked to all the aides, teachers etc. The nurse has talked to them. They know the procedures. I'm outraged - what if he passed out in the hall? At below 20 how could he even of been walking? Do they not understand how serious this disease is? What can I do to get it through their heads that this isn't "just a little sugar problem"?
     
  2. Amy C.

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    That is pretty distressing to have happen to your child. I think another meeting with the folks who are with your child are in order to let them know what happened.

    I would have your child start to carry glucose tabs in his pocket. Adults are human and can fail him again. If he had the tabs and felt low, he could take them himself. Eventually, he will be treating himself anyway and carrying a fast acting is a good habit to start.
     
  3. Becky Stevens mom

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    Oh boy:( Yeah that cant happen, not even once. The school is taking a huge risk that your son may pass out or have a seizure on the way to the nurse. Or God forbid he gets confused and goes into a closet or room and passes out. They have to follow his health plan and not do foolish things like let him walk to the nurse alone
     
  4. spamid

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    How scary! Glad he's okay. I would definitely remind everyone involved of the seriousness of this.
     
  5. tiger7lady

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    I circled back with the nurse after I calmed down a bit and things seem to be under control. She had a meeting with the principal, assistant principal, and the aides to determine where we went wrong. The principal got approval from the superintendent to get an extra playground aide out there so somebody will always have at least 1 eye on him. I don't know why it didn't dawn on me before about glucose tabs in his pocket. I feel really stupid about that but I will be picking some up on my way home from work and he will carry them daily. He doesn't really remember anything except being on the playground, feeling low, thinking the aide was too far away to walk over to, and pounding on the door.

    The assistant principal brought up some sort of device that is an alarm and he wears around his neck. If he needs help during a severe low and doesn't feel he can get someone then he pulls the alarm and it would alert the aides. I thought this was a great idea for while he's at recess. I'll have to do some searching.

    Now I'm left wondering why he went that low in the first place. His ratios haven't changed. He's not sick. Mon-Thur they were inside for recess since it was too cold so this was the first day outside for recess this week but last week and every other week he was fine. Was it just because he was so excited to have outside recess today he played harder and missed the warning signs of a low? Is it the cold? *Sigh* I guess I'll never know.
     
  6. Amy C.

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    I am glad that folks were alarmed at the school.

    The colder temperatures cause more energy to be burned. I have lost weight since the temperature went down a bit.

    My son is running lower as well.
     
  7. quiltinmom

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    I felt this way a little bit when talking to DS's teacher about his D. She seemed to be a little more casual about it than I would like. :confused: One good thing is the teacher across the hall is T1, so hopefully she can help if anything goes wrong.

    I guess they get comfortable and sometimes too relaxed because since nothing has ever happened before, it seems like it never will.

    I'm so glad your DS is okay!!! That would be super scary.
     
  8. sarahspins

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    I know this isn't terribly reassuring, but I have been walking (and talking) close to that low (I've never tested LO, but I've been in the 20's), and from all appearances "seemed" fine, even though looking back on it I know that my decision making ability was SIGNIFICANTLY impaired... I made more than one cross-campus trip (to the bookstore to buy juice) while low when I was in college and should have known better. I should have been able to just ask someone for money for the venting machines or some other kind of help - for whatever reason I just didn't.

    Honestly this kind of thing is just the sort of random thing that will likely happen when he is low.. because his brain is just not functioning right, and it doesn't take him very long to make decisions that have him moving to seek treatment, faster than a teacher or anyone else might necessarily "catch" him doing so.. or even suspect anything is wrong, and he's not always going to choose the "right" thing to do... it takes a long time to form habits that will carry through even when you are compromised.
     
  9. Amy C.

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    When very low at school, my son goes to the office. Since entering high school, he never goes to the office for routine care. He has his meter and tabs in his pockets and his backpack, and of course his pump.

    Still when very low, he has gone to the office to get a juice. Why he can't remember he has tabs in his pockets is beyond me. When low, the brain doesn't work well.
     
  10. JackyH

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    I'm sorry that happened to your son. Thinking about the "what ifs" would send you crazy. My son had a severe low in the classroom and was so mentally impaired he could not even put his hand up to get the teacher's attention - she was just over the other side of the classroom. He said he just couldn't get his brain to work. The kid that was sitting with him noticed that he was acting a bit weird but didn't really think anything of it. In the aftermath (and with Oscar's permission) the teacher spoke to all his classmates asking them to always get an adult's attention if they ever notice him behaving strangely. Perhaps this would help too providing your son doesn't mind. We also make sure he has a tube of glucose tabs in his coat pocket or his pump band at all times.
     
  11. mamamccoy87

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    It's the cold. If Grace is outside playing in the snow, she drops like a rock!! Gave her 20 extra carbs one day before going out to play, checked her 30 min later was 35!!!

    Wish I knew what to tell you to help prevent - maybe decrease the basal if pumping?
     
  12. tiger7lady

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    We're not pumping yet but I'll keep that in mind come Jan/Feb when we do start the pump.

    I picked up the tabs and he's been carrying them in his pocket. They also had a conference with the group of boys he hangs out with and explained to them that if he is acting weird to grab a teacher or an aide. They were very proactive to it so that makes me happy. I just hope that next time something like this happens everything goes smoothly and people don't forget what they are supposed to do.
     
  13. Caleb's*mom

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    O wow.......
     
  14. mom2two

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    Is there a reason someone can't have his meter AND juice/tabs outside on the playground. IMHO your meter and tabs/juice should always be you, especially outside at recess.
     
  15. tiger7lady

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    Ok, again I feel dense because I never thought about it. His classroom is literally the next door over from the nurse so he has a total of 3 steps to get to her office from his class but I never thought about him bringing that outside at recess. Seriously, how could I be so dumb...oy. Thanks for the suggestion.
     
  16. deafmack

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    I totally agree with this. I think kids should be able to carry their diabetes supplies with them at all times especially their meter and glucose tabs.
     
  17. Tuff

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    The EXACT same scenario happened to my son. Teacher sent him on his own from the playground to "go find" his aid in the school and get some juice when he said he didn't feel good.

    I couldn't believe it when I found out! This teacher was not that concerned about the diabetes since her father had it and she thought she understood it. I had tried to make her understand how serious this disease can be.

    The only thing that made her realize was when this incident happened and she saw that he was "LO" too. I guess some good came out of it because she learned a lesson but boy oh boy.
     

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