advertisement

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 23

Thread: Foot problems

  1. #1

    Default Foot problems

    I have been reading up on things to consider about when travelling with a teen with diabetes. There is a lot of mention about protecting feet around pools, oceans and wearing appropriate shoes to avoid blisters etc. Can wounds and infections be that difficult to heal in young children as well? I didn't think that i would have to worry about something like this already. Have your children had problems with wounds and healing?
    Thanks
    Carla mom to a lovely 17 year old daughter with Type 1 diabetes diagnosed Nov 15/2015
    Nov15/2015 to March/2016 NPH therapy Humolg/Humilin N
    March2016 ongoing MDI therapy Lantus/Humalog
    17 year old son (twins with my daughter)
    15 year old daughter with Down Syndrome/Legg Perthes disease

  2. #2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Artgirl View Post
    I have been reading up on things to consider about when travelling with a teen with diabetes. There is a lot of mention about protecting feet around pools, oceans and wearing appropriate shoes to avoid blisters etc. Can wounds and infections be that difficult to heal in young children as well? I didn't think that i would have to worry about something like this already. Have your children had problems with wounds and healing?
    Thanks
    I think this is a problem more likely to be seen in a person whose d isn't as well controlled. The feet are the furthest away from the heart, so circulation problems will be found in the feet first (and perhaps the retinas). Plus the slower healing (caused by the decreased circulation), as you mentioned. Plus if there's nerve damage from high blood sugars, a sore may not be felt, thus the need for visual inspection.

    I hear comments about foot sores mostly when the audience is older people who have type 2 d. But type 1s should keep an eye on their feet too. At d camp they always want the kids to inspect their feet. It's just a good habit to get into, but I doubt it's a huge problem for young people with well controlled diabetes. I guess my take on it is, causally watch for anything abnormal, but it's not worth worrying about.

    Fwiw, Ds has never had a foot sore that didn't heal as expected. A couple months ago he had a plantar wart frozen and it healed just fine, perhaps even faster than I expected.
    DS age 14 dx'ed 9/09 Pumping with MM 5/11-9/15
    Started Pumping with t:slim 9/15
    Started Dexcom 10/15

  3. #3

    Default

    This is one of my pet peeves so I had to reply. But I will control myself and just say that there is nothing you need to do differently on this vacation in terms of her feet. Children and teens with Type 1 diabetes should absolutely go barefoot in the summer. It's one of the fun parts of the warm weather. I think a better use of your time and energy is to change what you are reading. Not sure if it was on the Internet or a book but I suggest finding a more accurate source. I hope you and your daughter enjoy the trip.

    Here are some books that might be helpful to you:

    Type 1 Diabetes: A Guide for Children, Adolescents and Young Adults -- and Their Caregivers
    by Ragnar Hanas, M.D. Published by Marlowe & Company, New York,
    http://www.amazon.com/Type-Diabetes-.../dp/1569243964


    Understanding Diabetes (aka The Pink Panther book)
    by Dr. Peter Chase of the Barbara Davis Center at the University of Colorado.
    http://www.childrensdiabetesfdn.org/publications.html

    Think Like a Pancreas: A Practical Guide to Managing Diabetes with Insulin
    by Gary Scheiner, Barry Goldstein
    http://www.amazon.com/Think-Like-Pan.../dp/1569244367

    Sweet Kids: How to Balance Diabetes Control & Good Nutrition with Family Peace
    by Betty Page Brackenridge, MS, RD, CDE & Richard R. Rubin, PhD, CDE. Published by the American Diabetes Association, 2002. 250 pages. Softcover.
    http://www.amazon.com/Sweet-Kids-Bal.../dp/1580401244
    Last edited by Christopher; 07-07-2016 at 02:56 PM.
    Chris
    Dad to Danielle, 18 years old
    Diagnosed 17 Aug 2007
    MDI (Novolog and Levemir) Aug 2007 to Aug 2015
    Dexcom G5 System with Share 22 Jul 2015
    Omnipod 11 Aug 2015

  4. #4

    Default

    Both the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons and the American Podiatric Medical Association state that no one with diabetes (regardless of age or type) should ever walk barefoot (I learned this recently from a handout I received at an endo appointment). That said, I personally ran around barefoot as a kid including for hours upon hours each week in the spring/fall all over Central Park in NYC (including leaping off rocks) which is a generally dirty place. I think you have to use your judgement but really in a recently diagnosed teenager this isn't what I would be worried about while traveling. I never wore shoes at the beach or pool as a kid and I don't now. I also never wore flip flops in the showers at sleepaway camp for 7 weeks each summer (I'm horrified thinking about that now) and I have never had athlete's foot or any sort of fungal thing.

    As a kid I never had issues with wounds healing. As an adult, I have had one ulcer type thing on the top of my foot that took ages to heal but I am not 100% sure it was due to diabetes. My A1C was 5.8 at the time. I asked my endo (well the NP) at my last appointment if I should see a podiatrist regarding that ulcer which had healed and showed her a picture and she basically laughed and said I really shouldn't be concerned about my feet at 22 and gave me the pamphlet about walking barefoot.
    Meg
    Young adult with diabetes
    Pancreatectomy 2/17/2003
    Pumping 2/19/2003, Currently w/ Omnipod
    Medtronic 2003-2015, tslim 2015-2016
    CGM: MM 2006-2013, Dexcom G4 2013-2015, Dexcom G5 09/2015

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Illinois
    Posts
    956

    Default

    I think its a good discussion to have. diabetics can both have neuropathy where they don't feel wounds as well or slow healing where wounds don't heal so well. Both happen in poorly controlled diabetes. I think going barefoot in safer situations is a good thing and walking barefoot is good for the feet. That being said it is a great idea to get into the habit of always doing a foot check after walking around barefoot and at each shower/bath. I tell my kids not to walk around barefoot in situations where it has no benefit - like at the mall while trying on shoes. My daughter was buying some sandals and wanted to walk from one department to another barefoot rather than put her shoes back on. If we break a glass in the house I clean it up and have her stay back.
    Alan father of daughter with T1D born 2/2005
    Diagnosed 9/07/10, T-Slim, Dexcom
    Son with T1D born 11/00 diagnosed 7/1/14, T-Slim, Dexcom

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Lakeman View Post
    I think its a good discussion to have. diabetics can both have neuropathy where they don't feel wounds as well or slow healing where wounds don't heal so well. Both happen in poorly controlled diabetes. I think going barefoot in safer situations is a good thing and walking barefoot is good for the feet. That being said it is a great idea to get into the habit of always doing a foot check after walking around barefoot and at each shower/bath. I tell my kids not to walk around barefoot in situations where it has no benefit - like at the mall while trying on shoes. My daughter was buying some sandals and wanted to walk from one department to another barefoot rather than put her shoes back on. If we break a glass in the house I clean it up and have her stay back.
    The OP's child has been dx less than 8 months. She has nothing to worry about with her daughters feet.

    Yes, I agree with you that it is a good thing to be aware of in general but in this specific case I don't think it is relevant. Unless the OP has seen signs of wounds not healing properly or signs of neuropathy, which she did not mention.
    Chris
    Dad to Danielle, 18 years old
    Diagnosed 17 Aug 2007
    MDI (Novolog and Levemir) Aug 2007 to Aug 2015
    Dexcom G5 System with Share 22 Jul 2015
    Omnipod 11 Aug 2015

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Megnyc View Post
    Both the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons and the American Podiatric Medical Association state that no one with diabetes (regardless of age or type) should ever walk barefoot .
    This is the kind of over-generalized, blanket statement "advice" that drives me crazy. Ack.

    #freethefeet
    Last edited by Christopher; 07-07-2016 at 02:58 PM.
    Chris
    Dad to Danielle, 18 years old
    Diagnosed 17 Aug 2007
    MDI (Novolog and Levemir) Aug 2007 to Aug 2015
    Dexcom G5 System with Share 22 Jul 2015
    Omnipod 11 Aug 2015

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Pacific NW
    Posts
    1,314

    Default

    My daughter spends well over half of her waking moments barefoot. I don't give this a second thought because she's not a poorly-controlled Type 2 diabetic. Period.
    Mother of two wonderful daughters:
    *T age 14 - dx'd 01/24/2014 at age 11.5
    MDI: Humalog & Lantus 01/24/2014 - 06/04/2014
    Dexcom: G4 05/02/2014; G4 with Share 03/11/2015; G5 10/07/2015
    OmniPod with Humalog 06/05/2014; Apidra 09/12/2014
    *C age 27 - reactive airway disease; married 08/30/2014

  9. #9

    Default

    When I'm at home, I'm barefoot (I am a weirdo who watches Netflix while walking around my house, so I might be walking 6-9 miles a day barefoot). When I go outside (especially in extreme hot or cold), I wear appropriate shoes. I've lost count on how many times I would quickly run outside barefoot to get the mail during a summer day and would slightly injure my feet while walking/sprinting across the hot pavement.

    I might be overly cautious about my feet. On top of my diabetes, I have a super strong family history of peripheral neuropathy (my mother, maternal grandmother, and at least one maternal uncle have it, and none of them have diabetes), so it benefits me in the long-term to adopt foot habits that will prevent ulceration early on. The only shoes that I have really given up on wearing are sandals (they offer no protection against injury and often offer no support for the amount of physical activity I do) and anything with more than an inch heel (again because I walk a ton). Typically I wear some form of a casual sneaker that covers most of my foot (I really like Sketcher's GoWalk series).

    I'm more concerned about nail salons and diabetes than walking barefoot. I have a family member who is a type 2 diabetic (and like me has fugly callused feet), and the endo recommended that he get a pedicure. Um... did the endo really recommend that he expose his feet to all sorts of bacteria and other nasties (are they reusing tools, using disposable tools, or using an autoclave? how good are their foot basins sanitized? etc.) all while increasing the chances that he has his foot cut while the calluses are removed (thus providing a perfect entry way for those little nasties into the body)? I thought most nail salons would also refuse to do a pedicure if you're diabetic (huge liability issues?).
    Type 1 diabetic since November 6, 2013 at age 18. In DKA at diagnosis; Glucose 560's; Diagnosis A1C 11.7
    Current medication: Pumping Novolog with TSlim

  10. #10

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mimikins View Post
    I thought most nail salons would also refuse to do a pedicure if you're diabetic (huge liability issues?).
    First, a disclaimer: I have never gotten a pedicure in my life. So I may be way off base here, but how in the world would a nail salon know that a customer had diabetes???? Secondly, I don't think there would be ANY concern on the salon's part about liability issues. How a person does or does not take care of themselves after they leave the salon has no bearing on the salon itself.

    In your particular case, with a family hx of PN and you having Type 1 diabetes for 3 years, it probably makes sense, in a general way, to keep an eye on your feet (that sounded weird). But I still believe that in the specific case of the OP, she should do nothing different on this trip with her daughter than she would normally do, using common sense.
    Chris
    Dad to Danielle, 18 years old
    Diagnosed 17 Aug 2007
    MDI (Novolog and Levemir) Aug 2007 to Aug 2015
    Dexcom G5 System with Share 22 Jul 2015
    Omnipod 11 Aug 2015

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
advertisement