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would you allow your kid to do this?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Ivan's Mum, Jul 22, 2010.

?

school camp with no Diabetes expert?

  1. yes

    23 vote(s)
    41.1%
  2. no

    33 vote(s)
    58.9%
  1. Ivan's Mum

    Ivan's Mum Approved members

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    The school I work at is having school camp and a T1 child (aged about 12) wants to go. She's on injections. It will be 4 nights 5 days on an island. Living in old army accommodation. There will probably be a general first aid person there.

    Question: would you let your child go without a person that was skilled at D management?

    School is nervous about it as her family can't attend, D specialist thinks that it's fine and that the school needs to step up because the kid can manage herself.

    Don't know the kid but none of the kids are old beyond their years at this school.
     
  2. meg9901

    meg9901 Approved members

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    I'd hate to say a flat out yes or no. At 12, if the child does her own D management, does she do what she's supposed to do consistently? Is she well versed in how to handle a variety of likely/possible circumstances? In cell phone contact with a parent? Is there a way off the island in case of emergency? Does the kid REALLY REALLY want to be there? Can the first aid person get a crash course?
    My kid at 10 isn't ready for this under these circumstances. Maybe their kid is. I didn't vote.
     
  3. sam1nat2

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    what kind of camp? Over night?
    Too many variables to answer. If it is something local, I'd have no problems.

    As it is right now, Sam's buddies would know to get something in him if he were too low.

    At the same time, just because someone is a medical professional doesn't mean they would know what to do in an emergency.

    Along these same lines, those whose kids carry an epi pen, do you let your kids attend these types of camps with non medical people?
    **not trying to be snarky, truly wondering** I realize that those ana rxns are truly life threatening
     
  4. Ivan's Mum

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    4 nights 5 days, only by boat (or emergency helicopter) it's out on an island in the harbour but would take an hour by boat (at a guess)

    I'm not sure what the kid is like, neither is the office so they don't see her for a load of hypo's or anything so I have no idea what her standard of care is.
     
  5. LizinTX

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    O.k. let me tell you just a quick little story. My ds is 14 went to a church lockin. He knows how to do everything, gave him my cell phone--none of the adults really knows anything about D, I gave them a crash course on lows, thought he would be fine. He goes low into the 40's :eek:, calls me while he is treating, then for some inexplicable reason he turns OFF the cell phone. I can't get ahold of him and he doesn't call me back--even though that is the rule--because he went back to playing with the other kids. So I ended up racing back up to the church--30 minutes away--in a panic because I have no idea what is going on.

    So even though this turned out o.k., I could not imagine this happening on an island, without someone knowing what to do in an emergency. Emergencies happen, D changes the rules on itself faster than you can predict the outcome, and "someone" needs to be that childs backup for just in case.
     
  6. sisterbeth43

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    I let Reann go on a trip to Washington, DC with her 8th grade class. There were a couple of moms going who were nurses and one dad who was a dr, but she took care of herself. I told her to run a bit on the high side to try and avoid lows. It was fine. She was home for 2 nights andthen left for D camp for a week. (she was 14 at the time)
     
  7. Mistync991

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    i voted no because of the fact it is on an island...

    may not have good cell reception
    to long a boat ride in an emergency only air lift
    or even in a lesser emergency its still on an island

    if someone was trained in d ...and well trained even if they werent nurse or whatever i would feel more ok but why cant the parents or a parent go ...do they have a 504 if so this covers this and they have to provide someone and if the parent is willing to go if they dont have someone they are allowed and often paid to go..well the cost of going is paid ...i have had to do this on a zooo trip they even gave me money to get my lunch wiht that day

    if the parents are ok with it then you can see
     
  8. Ivan's Mum

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    it's New Zealand, no 504's here and the school don't have to provide (and won't have enough money from the government) a paid person.
     
  9. wilf

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    If it is a 12 year oild child, they should normally be able to do day-time D care. Problem is the nights. Unless a grown up was willing to go the extra mile I'd not send the child.
     
  10. tbcarrick

    tbcarrick Approved members

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    I would not feel comfortable sending my son alone,so I vote no.Too many
    uncontrolled things like location,location.location!!
     
  11. selketine

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    If some adults are willing to be trained in emergency care (like glucagon) and willing to keep an eye on her at night - then maybe. I think I read something once about (I hope I'm not making this up) a situation where the older child had a plan to show his meter to the responsible adult in the group who confirmed that things were in range or the right action was taken (and that the kid was actually testing).

    If the emergency helicopter could get there in a flash. I agree with the question about kids with epi-pens - do they allow kids with severe allergies to go who take epi-pens? If one of those kids has an allergic reaction you have a short time to get to the hospital for more treatment - the epipen only works for awhile.

    Too many variables to answer otherwise - if the child is very mature and responsible, and used to overnights then maybe. If this is the first trip away from home - probably not the best choice - especially because of the island location and if the kid started to have problems or be non-compliant - a major trip to get them back home.
     
  12. Beach bum

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    I would say yes only if the child can show she is responsible with her daily care during the day time and if there is an adult who is responsible and willing to do night time checks. I would want to make sure that there is an adult who could take over care or treat in an emergency.

    So I guess what I'm saying Fran, is that if it was you who was the adult going, I'd be ok with it:D

    I guess what I would do is sit down and talk to the parents about how well the child can handle herself, what they would like to plan to do for evening care etc.
     
  13. ecs1516

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    I agree, the nights are the problem. An being on a Island is not not like that call 911.
     
  14. chbarnes

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    Depends on the child and their diabetes. We sent our son on a 3 week trip overseas with a cell phone and adults who we had "trained" for about an hour.
    Their itinerary included Australia, New Zealand, and Fiji. He did a fantastic job.
    He did have CGM and a pump. His numbers were relatively stable. He was 11.
    It would be harder now at 13 because growth spurts are causing a lot more variability. But I think it was important for him to see that he really could do anything.

    Chuck
     
  15. swellman

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    I can't vote yes or no as we did two one week stints at a day camp at a local private school. There was another diabetic child attending and we had a sit down with the person running the school. I think she did a pretty good job handling the carb counting and communicated with us but in the end I got the impression that it was exhausting for her. She never admitted it but I could tell it was an extra layer of responsibilities. We decided no to go that route again when our son told us that he didn't really have a good time.

    So, depending on the level of independence of the child I would consider it again but I am leery when untrained and inexperienced people think they can handle the situation after a meeting or two and some literature and instruction. It takes forethought and diligence not afterthought and that's hard to come by without training and/or experience.

    $0.02
     
  16. Abbysmom

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    I'm voing yes

    Because my 10 year old can and has managed my toddlers daytime care and I am assuming I could train the first aid person to do so.

    I am however thinking there will be cell service and a way off the island.

    I have been pleasantly surprised how well non nedical people can be taught to take care of my child.
     
  17. emm142

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    I'd say it really depends. I'm sure I could have done this at 12y/o, but I'm not the most "normal" person ever, so... Would someone there be trained on glucagon?
     
  18. hawkeyegirl

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    It depends on (1) whether there would be someone trained on glucagon; and (2) whether the child would have a cell phone and guaranteed cell phone reception. The lack of either would be a deal breaker for me, even if the child was fully self-sufficient in D care.
     
  19. kiwiliz

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    I am wonderng if everyone who has voted yes has ever had a real fright with their child! I know people say they can cope - but they have NO IDEA what could possible go wrong and what things are like when they do. My dd, who was 12 at the time, was scheduled to go on a bush walk. It would have been over an hour, walking well by herself ie. not being carried, to the nearest road and an hour after that to the nearest doctor. The previous year one poor kid had broken his leg and nearly died because the weather was poor and the helicopter couldn't get in. If they hadn't taken a risk and set down just before nightfall he would have had to spend the night in sub zero temperatures.

    I asked the camp organiser if they were able to deal with emergencies, especially with diabetes. He said "Oh yes, my sister has diabetes". I thought great. He then went on to say "she couldn't ever have children because she was so out of control". I kept quiet while he rambled on about the last "Diabetic kid" he took, who went to bed over 24!!!!! (432) without a correction because he didn't want to go low overnight! I asked him would he be the person in charge on the actual trip and he said No he wasn't going - but he had run through the use of the glucagon in a full half hour talk with the new staff!

    This camp takes children with diabetes from other schools all the time. They are woefully unprepared to handle an emergency and letting your child go on a trip with incompetent people who think they are prepared is taking lucky dip with their lives. We don't have that right! If emergency help is close by, ie you are within 10 minutes of a doctor, that is a completely different situation.

    I offered to walk in with them, 10 minutes behind with the instructor who was invisible - but near , it costs nothing for mum or dad to go. They wouldn't let me - so we did something else adventurey while they did their walk. It worked out well - they all got a norovirus anyway (which was another medical emergency they were unprepared for).
     
  20. swellman

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    I just want to point out, and I suppose it's obvious but, it's not when things are going great that's at issue - it's when it doesn't that really matters. I would caution against finding comfort in that "nothing went wrong" when a child is in the care of "civilians" - it, in my opinion, should not give one a sense of security in the "civilians". It's when something goes badly that shows how a person can handle diabetes - it's the "fringe" judgment calls.

    For what it's worth, I consider myself fairly paranoid. I often wonder if I'm paranoid enough.

    $0.02
     

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