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Why was this funded?

Discussion in 'Research' started by Nick Masercola, Oct 11, 2011.

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  1. Nick Masercola

    Nick Masercola Approved members

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    Hey everybody,

    Found this ghastly article the other day and figured I'd share it. I work for the JDCA, and for those who don't know, we are trying specifically to change charity spending in a way so that more money goes into cure research. We believe there's a ton of money in the system that if put to the right venues, could greatly speed-up the process of getting a cure.

    Anyhow, this article I found was shocking because...well, quite frankly, I have no idea why it was funded. With so much money in the system that could be used for treatments and cure research, things like this are getting funded?

    http://www.reuters.com/article/2011/10/05/us-kids-who-watch-more-tv-idUSTRE79455A20111005

    I'm pretty sure five minutes thought and common sense could've come to the same educated conclusion. Even weirder, the "good" blood sugars still are very high.
     
  2. selketine

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    I can't disagree - that study doesn't really help me with anything. Perhaps change one variable (snacking habits) and that is the issue rather than tv watching.

    The research was done in Germany though it looks like so hopefully not funded by US organizations.

    I do sometimes read the clinicaltrials.gov site for research trials on diabetes or food allergies (another problem my son has) and sometimes I see a study that is a "what the heck".
     
  3. Lisa P.

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    I agree on the concept, there are so many studies funded out there (not exclusively diabetes -- "pediatric parenting" type studies in general) that make me nuts. Thousands to come up with a clinical trial to prove eating nothing but twinkies for two weeks affects the mood of a two year old, or some such garbage.

    What I found interesting, though, was that they were saying other factors like weight and income level were equalized. Meaning, the kids didn't have higher overall bg because they were eating poorly, for example, necessarily.

    I find it interesting because I have found that small spurts of activity make bg control more difficult because the effect of the insulin becomes more unpredictable; but when she has overall consistently more active days (particularly outside active days -- vitamin D?), like if she's out playing 5 hours every day of a week, her numbers become much, much easier to keep in range. She has both fewer highs and fewer lows.

    I also have read about a connection between dopamine, insulin, and seratonin in everyone, not diabetics, and read that flashing lights on a TV or computer screen has an effect on dopamine levels. I've long wondered whether this has an effect on how insulin works for Selah. It seems to me that if she has a day where she is in the car, for example, for 3 to 5 hours it will drive her bg consistently on an upward curve. But sitting in front of the TV for 3 to 5 hours can have a more jagged effect, with more sudden highs. Seems. . . .

    Anyway, I agree that if the study was just this, it's not much use, but maybe there was more to it, or maybe there is more planned?

    Who knows. . . .
     
  4. katerinas

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    wow!! groundbreaking stuff!!
     
  5. thebestnest5

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    I wonder how much was spent on this study.
     
  6. DadCares

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    My goodness what a waste. Hmm, I wonder if kids who exercise regularly, play sports, etc. have better A1Cs and better overall BG control compared to kids who sit on a couch? Please send me $1 Million so we can perform tests to solve this mystery. In the meantime, I'll channel the $1 Million to real research, and I'll publish the other "research" for free.
     
  7. Nick Masercola

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    Lisa: Your proposed questions ( such as the flashing lights on the tv causing high spikes versus the car ride) are more interesting and insightful than this study lol.

    Katerina: You've had the best response so far.
     
  8. lisac

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    What a waste of time! Who comes up with these type's of studies? Did an actual scientist do this study? Sheesh
     

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