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Why MDI?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by momandwifeoftype1s, Aug 31, 2011.

  1. frizzyrazzy

    frizzyrazzy Approved members

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    I can't even begin to see where you got THAT out of this thread.
     
  2. Lisa P.

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    Here's why I was reluctant to try the pump.

    I had other things to do and I really didn't think it would be very useful to us.

    It would have been a nice skill to pick up, but we had a lot going on and a lot of other places to put our energy and resources.

    My husband, however, had the impression that the pump would make our lives much, much easier. He also noted Selah was hating shots more, so that was the turning point.

    But I don't feel the pump made our lives easier at all -- this is just, of course, our family. I feel it made it much more complicated. Her care for awhile worsened because she was snacking more and spiking more and it took awhile to adjust to that. Our pump start was a horror movie. Our second start was better, but every time we pulled out that steel cannula it was a trial. The teflon didn't work for us at first. The steel didn't work for us later. We got down to changes every two days and we used Emla much of the time, so that's an hour sitting around every two days. We streamlined eventually, but site change day never stopped being a drag. How many times did I say, "Hey, we're going to be late to X, but darn it we had to get a site change in before we left the house"? I have spent hours and hours and hours troubleshooting and trying to make the pump work better. It invaded our lives.

    That said -- am I sorry we used it? No. I like having many tools. And the pump has advantages. We may go back and forth. I'm grateful it's available. But for some of us, it has big disadvantages. And my husband wound up being a little stubborn about making changes once we were on because the pump was "supposed" to make our lives easier and we had to learn the hard way that it didn't, so much, for us. I finally pushed it, and he can see the advantages of a pump break.

    The main problem I have with the pump is that it can be that magic elixir, we can wind up putting our hope in it and then not using evidence and reason. So that's not a pump thing, that's just a human thing. And for some people, many people, it's a life-changer. But I think we need to look at it with a steely eye and decide whether it really is improving our life or whether we just think any minute now it will start improving our lives.

    So, if some people can see before using the pump that it is not for them, and decide to put their energy into other things, I think that can be insight. Personally, I do like knowing how to pump. But I wonder if our life would be a little different today if I'd put my resources into another endeavor -- what if, for example, instead of learning how to use the pump and buying pump supplies we'd taught Selah how to ride a horse, or swim, or brought her on a few trips somewhere? Every choice made has an opportunity cost. Every family has to make their own call.
    :cwds:
     
  3. hawkeyegirl

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    ROFL. Yeah, you've missed the point of all of this entirely. But way to be completely offensive in 100 words or less. It usually takes me a LOT more verbage to be quite so dismissive and obtuse.

    I'd also like to see a show of hands of people who have "lovely compliant children." I'm not familiar with the concept. :rolleyes:
     
  4. Lee

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    Wow. Just wow.

    (FWIW - I did make Coco try the pump with the caveat that if she didn't like it, we would switch back to shots. She is now a willfull teenager with great control, who also happens to listen and respect her mother :mad:)
     
  5. Helenmomofsporty13yearold

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    "Both endos have fully supported our decision to hold off pumping. In fact, they won't let a child pump against his/her will. The child is considered part of the decision making process. Even if Brian and I both were insistent that Connor pump, he still has a voice to say, "I don't want to." "

    Some children are more wilful than others. I could no more force my kid to have a site stuck into her than I could get her to eat broccoli. She started pumping when she was ready and she is starting to like a lot more vegetables and varieties of food (still no broccoli even though I serve it often).

    I apologize for offending some of you. I get offended when I read posts that insist it is easy to get kids to comply. It is really my own pain talking because my kid has gone from being very agreeable about checking blood sugars to quite resistant (started at almost 15). I think she wants to go off the pump again because it is a constant reminder and it is easier to be away from home without packing extra sites, reservoirs, batteries.

    We are all doing what we think is best for our unique and wonderful child.
     
  6. hawkeyegirl

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    Who said it's easy to get kids to comply? Honestly, you have a habit of reading things into threads that are simply not there.
     
  7. Darryl

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    Interesting thread. My view is that it doens't matter how the insulin is delivered, it matters only that the blood sugar control is good.

    I do think a pump makes things a lot easier, and I think pumps should be available at diagnosis. But if personal preference is for shots, I see no reason why that should be a problem as long as control is good.

    Frequent testing and/or CGM use are the most important topics. If you know the BG frequently, you have a much better chance of keeping BG in range using any method of insulin delivery.
     
  8. MomofSweetOne

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    We've had a successful year using MDI...until the last few weeks. Puberty hormones are hitting big-time for my DD, and I can't maintain the levels that we could achieve just a few weeks ago. If I have her Lantus adjusted for nighttime/dawn, then she's fighting 70s throughout the day and not feeling well. If her basals are ok for the day, then I'm up dosing her with Lantus every three hours throughout the night to attempt to bring her down..and the following day she resides in the bathroom. The tears in her eyes as the ever increasing dose of Lantus burns upon injedtion break my heart. Between shots increasing to sometimes 8/day and 21 fingersticks, we've decided it's time to move to a CGM and a pump.

    She's excited about the switch after months of being adamantly opposed to pumping. I've had a harder time with the thought of a switch. Facing another learning curve when we've just gotten through a year of major learning sounded overwhelming. I don't like seeing the trial pump on her; to me it screams "My child is ill." And I wish more than anything for a cure that would make it go away.

    But, the bottom line for me is what makes life best for all of us, especially her? At this point, it seems like the pump is the better option. I don't like seeing her feel shaky through the afternoon hours, nor do I want her running high and risking damage to her eyes, kidneys, etc. I'm sure there will be things we like and dislike about pumping, just as there are about MDI. And we may want pump breaks sometimes. As one CDE told me, "They both have their own unique stresses, and neither is a cure." How very, very true!
     
  9. Christopher

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    Maybe it was a mistake in your typing, but you shouldn't be dosing her with Lantus every 3 hours throughout the night. As for the burning, are you keeping it at room temp? That might help. You could also consider switching to Levemir, which seems to burn less.

    As for the 21 fingersticks in a day, that seems like a lot to me. Is there a reason she is doing so many?

    You don't say how long she has had diabetes or what her insulin regimen is, so.....
     
  10. MomofSweetOne

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    She's on Lantus and Humalog. The every three hours is correction doses with Humalog, and sometimes recently her BGs have risen even higher at the next check despite the correction dose.

    She started on insulin 8.19.2011, so we've had 10 months of steady and two months of crazy. It's time to try an approach that will allow us to set different basals for different times of day. The 21 sticks occurred because of how she was feeling in the 70s for afternoon and evening hours, thus our desire for CGM, along with her nocturnal hypoglycemic unawareness.
     
  11. MomofSweetOne

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    I goofed...she started on insulin 8.19.2010, not 2011. And yes, we do keep the Lantus at room temperature, but it really bothers her. She envies her friend who has not yet hit puberty and is on 1/2 of her dose...where she was three months ago. :(
     
  12. Mom2Will

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    I did the same with Will who pumped until summer '10 we switched to back MDI then pumped through the school year, MDI summer '11 now back to pumping. Luckily, he isn't a teenager yet ;)He likes certain aspects of pumping yet likes the freedom of being unattached with MDI. Either way he gets insulin and acheived a pretty good A1C without the pump.

    And to the poster who gives her child Lantus every 3 hours: If that is true it is no wonder the child is going low, surely that was a typo
     
  13. Christopher

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    You could try spliting the dose of Lantus, AM/PM. It sounds like the pump might work out better for you though. Good luck!
     
  14. momandwifeoftype1s

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