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Why is there such a desparity in Diabetes education and treatment options???

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by mmgirls, Sep 12, 2011.

  1. Carseatmama

    Carseatmama Approved members

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    T2's in our hospital..

    My cousin is an RN at our local Hospital. I asked her how they treat the adults that come in with type 2. She said they test bs before thier meals and they treat high blood sugar but they don't give insulin for carbs. So basicly it is a vicious cycle.:(:mad::mad:
     
  2. tiger7lady

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    That was exactly my thought when my RN Aunt was telling me how they treat. I tried explaining to her that they are always being REACTIVE and not PROACTIVE. Makes no sense to me.
     
  3. twodoor2

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    I 100% agree with this, and when you factor in that every kid is different, and YDMV, well, you can't just slap the same rules up there for every kid. Diabetes care is a lot of trial and error too.
     
  4. Tony in Vancouver

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    Proud Canadian but I agree, I have been completely unimpressed with our pediatric endo, we were on the NPH, Novorapid plan and no one ever discussed how much insulin to give for extra carbs etc..... we were told to just follow the diet plan. It did not take my wife and I long to figure out our endo was stuck in the 80's.

    at our clinic visit 4 months after diagnosis we demanded to be put on a pump because my daughter was having almost nightly lows even though she was only getting NPH in the morning and Novorapid at breakfast and dinner. The endo gave in only because we were adamant. We have come to learn that the Childrens hospital endo staff is regarded as very "conservative".

    We are now on the pump and seriously considering asking for a new endo but at this point all we need from the endo is the A1C test every 3 months and the prescriptions. Our pump educator, who is a nurse, has been unbelievably helpful as were the nurses who did our initial diabetes education.

    I would welcome a change in the Canadian medical system where the Endos were held to a higher standard.
     
  5. MamaBear

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    When it comes to the 7 people I know with T2, and the few I recently met with T1, I have noticed alot of differences in treatment and understanding of Diabetes. Some know very little, some are VERY knowledgeable. I guess it depends on the care provided by the doctors, but also on the patient's or parent's own willingness to educate themselves. We met a woman in April at our eye doc appts. she was the gal who was doing the eye drops and such. She had been recently diagnosed with T2 and was asking me questions about diet, because her doctor didn't tell he anything about what or how she should be eating. I don't get why he wouldn't discuss such things with her. I found out the guy who does my taxes has T2, but he didn't know what the pills he takes for it even do. I explained it to him. I agree with the folks who stated earlier on that alot of folks take their doctor's word as gospel. I think alot of people don't realize that it's ok to question a doctor on their advice or their methods,or ask for more information. I think alot of folks don't feel they need to because well, they are doctors and they must know what they are talking about. It would be nice if everyone in the medical field could just get on the same page.
     
  6. Lisa P.

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    I think part of the problem is accountability.

    I don't want medical professionals to be afraid any little mistake is going to get them sued out of their profession, or thrown in jail, or whatever.

    But of all the horror stories I've run into with family and friends (one doctor I know of seems to have contributed by his negligence to the very early death of two people, my parents' each had doctors that would have missed late stage heart disease needing a triple bypass and stomach cancer if my folks hadn't been pushy about getting tests and opinons) and all the stories I've seen here of doctors patting moms on that back and sending the kids home because it's just a virus, then the kid goes into DKA, I've never once heard of a doctor facing any ramifications for their actions or inaction.

    Maybe there's something going on in the background that I don't know about, some kind of investigative system. But I think patients who get bad care aren't sure what's going on and if their perception is right -- after all, they are new to the game. And many are too busy dealing with the consequences of the bad care to complain or sue. I've never heard of anyone suing a doctor or nurse. I imagine when it does happen much of the time insurance pays and the higher premiums just get passed on in billing.

    I don't know what the answer is, but I know that if the guy at Taco Bell gives me a taco with raw meat he doesn't just lose me as a customer, he loses his job. If he did it through negligence or purposefully and I get sick he might face criminal charges. I'm not sure why a doctor who shortens the life of a person in his care should get less attention than that.
     
  7. mmgirls

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    I like your analogy! Just because a GP or (even endo) can take a T1 or T2 as a new patient if they are not willing or able to give then every option on care choices and help them find what works best, NOT THE EASIEST, then they should not care for them.
     
  8. deafmack

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    Yesterday, I took my Sister to see her doctor. In the clinic they had a lot of flyers related to diabetes. Some of these were of course good but others were not so good. And of course they were for people with type 2. Well it turned out that the van driver also has type 2 and he picked up a copy of each of the fliers and he told me that he is usually in the 150 to 250 range and he thought that was good. I pointed out to him that he would do a lot better if he was in the 90 to 130 range instead. He said he didn't know that but I said for him to eat less carbs and lower his carb intake and try it and see what happens. Low carb intake really helps people with type 2. Oh by the way, this guy was very thin, so weight clearly was not an issue with him.
     
  9. mmgirls

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    Not unless the very thin was ketone weight loss! I can easily imagine that IF those are fasting numbers that he could easily be going over 300 and running ketones after meals.
     

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