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Why every 3 months?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Mimi, Jan 4, 2011.

  1. Mimi

    Mimi Approved members

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    I'm just wondering about the reasons for seeing the endo (or endo team) every three months?

    After our last visit and the ridiculous conversation/advice we had, I'm thinking of spacing them out a bit longer. Amanda's A1C's are acceptable, she's happy and healthy and I feel we're managing just fine.

    Is it reasonable to extend time between visits (and A1C tests) if everything is going reasonably well?

    Why is the standard 3 months? Anyone know?
     
  2. emm142

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    I gave up on 3 months. Honestly, my D team are no help at all, I just come out of my appointments feeling angry and gaining nothing :p. I go every 6 months now.
     
  3. Becky Stevens mom

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    I think for us the insurance company wants it that way. Often I feel like not much has been accomplished besides getting Steven's A1C done. I suppose they feel that if something is going screwy they can try to make changes then and not wait longer:confused: If things are going screwy though, we will change them much sooner then 3 months. We could really do without the appt with the dietician:rolleyes:
     
  4. Midwestmomma

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    We do every 4 months....for us it's a 2 hour drive there...be there 1-1 1/2 hours...then 2 hour drive home. And our Endo team seemed to think that since we "I that is" handle the management so well that we can go every 4 months. I honestly wish we could go every 6 months, all I mostly use them for is scripts and school papers filled out.:eek::eek: oh ya, and an A1c..but I'm sure our peds could order that and fax to Endo.
     
  5. Tuff

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    "I'm just wondering about the reasons for seeing the endo (or endo team) every three months?"




    Actually I think it may be so that the child is used to having the team in their lives as they grow up. It teaches them that diabetes needs to be monitored and is serious and hopefully by the time they are teens they know the routine and will stick to it - endo every 3 months whether they need it or not. Just guessing. I agree they aren't much help at these clinics but it in the back of my mind I am thinking it shows my son that diabetes needs to be monitored and is a serious disease and that lots of people care about how he is managing not just Mom and Dad.
     
  6. Mimi

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    I understand your point and agree that as teens with puberty and hormones etc, 3 months may be required.

    But what about as adults? Every 3 months? How do you get time off work every 3 months for a doctor's appointment?

    I'm not downplaying the importance of regular care for people with diabetes just questioning whether the current frequency is really required?:confused:
     
  7. McKenna'smom

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    I believe that 3 months is just the Standard Care Procedure adopted by whoever makes those determinations. As far as adults, it may not be every 3 months.
     
  8. Tuff

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    Once they are adults they are basically on their own and it will be up to the person to go to doctors whenever they feel the need. Every 6 mths to a year? I know in Canada once you are 18 you are on your own which is why I hope my son will see these appts as an example of what is expected of him to monitor his diabetes in the future. I would think 6 mths to a year would be more reasonable as an adult since by then they won't be needing "us parents" to be on top of their every move. I'm hoping the appts set an example for good life long habits of never stopping monitoring with a doctor in the future. I know it is probably wishful thinking but it is the only reason I can come up with for these 3 mth appts that seem pointless to so many of us.
     
  9. 3kidlets

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    My father in law is T1 and in his 60s. He doesn't go to the endo every three months. I think only once a year - but he sees lots of other specialists in between as well as regular checkups. He's extremely healthy and in control of D.
     
  10. TheFormerLantusFiend

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    I have an endo with nice office hours and would not expect to have to miss work to see him.

    I see him every 4 months or so when I'm okay, more often when I'm not. For me the reason is to keep him in the loop if I need him, so he knows roughly what's going on with my diabetes and health. I need to have somebody who knows what's going on. I even put him down as my emergency contact person on forms.
     
  11. angiej

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    I have always understood that the HBa1c is a reading created from the bodies 'data' from the past 3 months, so I have always assumed that by having appointments every 3 months the endo is keeping a 'constant' watch.

    We could choose to have less frequent visits, but I have maintained the 3 month pattern as I worry in the future it might be harder to increase the frequency if we had chosen to drop it previously (hope that makes sense - all medical stuff here is 'free' in the UK, so not reliant on insurance or anyone else making these decisions for us - since we are offered 3 monthly, it seems daft not to take the opportunity).
     
  12. mamamccoy87

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    Every 3 months is so endo can check on things, check A1C, urine for proteins, etc to catch any renal complications early. Even though the majority of people on here are very on top of things, how many times do we make changes, have problems? Now think of people who aren't on top of things - this is an opportunity for endo to fine tune things, and check to make sure there are no complications. And it is the standard of care - check ADA position papers and that is what is recommended for physicians.

    Even though it is an inconvenience, I appreciate another set of eyes -some days its hard to see the forest for the trees, or make heads or tails of this crazy thing!
     
  13. Ali

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    It is the "standard of care" for adults also. It is silly and the Docs know it for those at all stable but if they work in a large clinic that is what they tell you. I think twice a year is plenty and would prefer once a year given the other Docs I see. Endo, GP, Eye. Plus any visits for other stuff that happens. So I could arrange a visit every four months with one Doc. have then chart the BP and weight. Do labs three times a year, and be good. Now I just have to get my Endo on board with this.:pAli
     
  14. Brenda

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    I think it is related to getting an A1c. The A1c is essentially a measure of how much glucose "sticks" to the red blood cells (it sticks when your BG is over 150 mg/dl, exponentially higher with higher BGs, if that makes sense) and red blood cells die after about 90 days.

    This is hard to explain because some diabetes teams have been known to say, "Lows will bring down your A1c." This is NOT correct. If you have more lows, which you may have when striving for tighter control, you will have a lower A1c. The lows are not canceling out the highs.

    If your BGs are in the 150-200 range most of the time, your A1c will be elevated. If they are 80-120 (dream world), it will be lower, BUT if it runs in that range until a week before your A1c when you get sick and stuck in the 250-400 range, the A1c will be elevated, despite the 70 days or so of in range numbers. If you have your A1c done, then you get sick and are in the 250-400 range for two weeks, then drop back into range, you may not see much effect from that initial two weeks. The red blood cells die slowly and the amount of glucose attached to them is slowly dissipating.
     
  15. Connie(BC)Type 1

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    I have a standing blood requisition, every 3 months A1c, every 6 months for the "works" I see the endo every couple of years at her office, I can email anytime, I also email a friend who is Type 1 and sort of my CDE(have never been to her office)
     
  16. jilmarie

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    I go every 6 months-ish, but it's actually been almost a year since I was last seen because I had to switch practices for insurance and there was a 4 month wait as a new patient. Aside from getting a technology update and updating my endo on my life, I don't get anything out of the appointment. I am capable of managing my own diabetes and making my own adjustments. My A1c is stable and low. I'm doing the best that I can so even if my A1c bumped, I probably wouldn't make any drastic changes.

    I think especially for growing children many parents are reluctant to make changes on their own. Every three months the endo will assess their numbers and make the needed bump in insulin.
     
  17. ecs1516

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    We go ever 4 months. It is a long drive and cost $100 to go.
     

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