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why alcohol is a problem

Discussion in 'Parents of Teens' started by wilf, Dec 8, 2012.

  1. MamaC

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    In my area of the US, underage drinking is rampant, and it is far more binge than social...and it starts EARLY. Not just beer and wine coolers, either...hard liquor is often preferred.

    High schools have penalties related to athletics and other extracurricular activities - if you're caught.

    Colleges, at least the public ones, all have sanctions in place for alcohol violations...if you're caught. From the rate of recurrence, I'd say these sanctions are not having the desired effect.

    Kids are going to drink. I've reserved a special place in Hades for the "well meaning" parents who open their homes for parties under the guise of "getting the kids accustomed to drinking before they go to college."

    It's a slippery slope, and our kids/young adults with diabetes are at particular risk; no matter how smart and "responsible" they are, when left to their own devices as they will be someday, impaired judgement and decision making loom large.
     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2012
  2. selketine

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    Thanks for the feedback. William is still just 10 so not an immediate issue but I found it interesting. I hadn't realized that drinking has an affect on how the body is using insulin.

    I agree that some pizza with the beer - always a winning combination - and always good to eat when you drink in any case.
     
  3. Timmy Mac

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    well in my limited experience with drinking,
    things like beer and wine I don't have to bolus for. However, sugarier drinks like margaritas or mixed drinks I DO have to. some of them can have like 50 carbs in a cup! I do bolus conservatively when i have a drink though. I'll usually knock a unit off the total amount. I really don't drink so much at a time that it has a big effect.

    Just throwing a bit of experience in.
     
  4. Pauji5

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    thanks for respoding.
     
  5. MomofSweetOne

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    Just out of curiosity, do your daughter's friends know the high risk she's playing with, that severe lows can look like drunkenness, and what the result could be if you weren't attentive at night, like you won't be when she leaves for college?
     
  6. wilf

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    They're not drinking that much, but it's a valid point and is worth giving some thought to. I probably should chat with them. Thanks. :cwds:

    And just to be clear, the effects I've described in my daughter are associated with moderate consumption of alcohol. Obviously if a Type 1 were to drink copious amounts the consequences could be dire. That was one of the reasons I thought I'd post this.
     
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2012
  7. Mish

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    If you're going say that your daughter is old enough to drink with her friends, then the conversation needs to start with her, not you. I find it hard to reconcile the two facts as they are being presented:

    "My child is old enough, and responsible enough, to drink with friends "
    yet...
    "I don't think she's responsible enough to have a conversation with her friends about the seriousness of drinking with diabetes and that someone will have to look after her if she becomes intoxicated."
     
  8. wilf

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    These are your words, not mine. And she's my daughter, not yours.

    But I will consider how best to impart the needed information to her close friends. It could be it already has been - I hadn't thought about this till seeing the earlier post, and haven't yet chatted about it with my daughter.
     
  9. Mish

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    That's how I'm interpreting your words. So, yes, my interpretation of what I'm reading. But as always, it's not my child, just like any other post, YDMV, your child raising may vary.

    And since I'm here adding my two cents, what about imparting this info to the other kids' parents? Perhaps start there, not with the kids. As the parent of a teen I think I'd want to know what was going on and what situations my child could be placed in by someone else's behavior.
     
  10. danismom79

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    I'm curious about how that conversation would go, and what the other parents think if/when they find out. I know I'd be pissed, but I'd be pissed if I found out my kid was drinking in the first place. Never mind the added pressure they'd have of making sure their classmate lived through the night.
     
  11. Mish

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    Which, I don't have to mention, is being asked of other intoxicated 16 year olds.
     
  12. wilf

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    I'm not sure what you're going on about here.

    The parents are aware of what their kids are up to. No one is facing the pressure of "making sure their classmate lived through the night". My daughter and her friends are home safe and at an agreed upon time (parents are doing the driving), and she is not coming home drunk or low.

    The risk of lows is overnight and next morning, not during the evening.
     
  13. Lee

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    I think you are in a tough spot Wilf because drinking, I presume, is legal at this age where you live. I, as the mom of a 16 year old, can't even begin to imagine my daughter drinking. Teens don't drink because they like to experience the subtle taste of a microbrew or the bite of a good shot of whiskey. They drink because they like how it makes them feel, which is drunk.
     
  14. danismom79

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    I was "going on" about what kind of conversation you would have with someone else's minor children about drinking responsibly with their high-risk friend.

    And she hasn't come home drunk or low, yet.
     
  15. wilf

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    I'm about done here. We're well off the point I was originally posting about, which was to caution parents of Type 1 teens about what alcohol could do to overnight blood sugars.

    The teen years are fiendlishly tricky to navigate, for parents and children alike. Even more so when Type 1 D is in the picture. We all do the best we can.

    I wish you all the best of luck. :cwds:
     
  16. nanhsot

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    I'll just ditto this. You can stick your head in the sand and assume it's not your kid, or you can act and be ready. I choose to act, educate, and otherwise be prepared.

    Just for the record, we don't serve or advocate serving teens that we did not birth and raise. We ask our son to experiment in our presence, and at this time I truly believe the bulk of it has been done in this way. In my state drinking with a parent is fully legal. Serving or knowing of serving others is not...we will NEVER serve or approve of another kid's drinking in our presence. NEVER. We've had one very bad drunk; it was an immense learning experience for all of us, and the scariest moment of my life to date. Happy to discuss privately with anyone as I learned a lot. Our son is VERY responsible and very aware of the ramifications if he drinks, drives, or otherwise gets caught outside our presence. He's a smart kid, he weighs the risks and makes his decision.

    I'd rather he not drink. I'm living in my own reality world and prefer to educate him so he's ready when he's no longer in my home, which is frighteningly soon.

    I remember 18~it was legal then. He's 18 and he's curious, he's normal, and he's at risk. My approach is one of caution, education, and frank reality.
     
  17. mmgirls

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    I greatly appreciate your cadid information about a tough subject. It is great information, but think it can be very hard for parents to hear when they know the child. KWIM.

    When others have reposted information in regards to an article or blog about the dangers of drinking for a T1, it was just information. Now it is so close to home, with a child of a man that is so insightful, caring and helpful.

    I think there may be parents reading and thinking why does he not just strickly prohibit her from drinking/ experimenting at all with alcohol. she is a smart girl that surely can see the logic of not drinking.

    I too wish you the best.
     
  18. wdhinn89

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    It seems like you and your daughter have a good plan in place for now. The only thing I will add is to have her eat before bed. Pizza, cheese, something with fat and protein and I would also think about getting her used to setting an alarm and checking herself (with you peaking in the wings to make sure it happens). It is important for us to prepare our kids for when we are not there for them. We need them to be responsible during sleep overs, away at college, moving out, adulthood etc.
     
  19. MamaC

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    Here's the thing. I don't permit my (still underage) adult CWD to drink in my home (did not permit my non CWD to, either). He knows the risks. I know the risks. Some friends of his, and their parents, are aware there ARE risks. He was introduced to alcohol by his friends. He was permitted, by some parents, to drink in their homes.

    He's headstrong.
    He's in college...at a party school (not sure there's any other kind).
    He THINKS he's being responsible when he drinks. And he's not sitting around sipping a nice chianti. He's drinking to get hammered.

    The EMTs know him by name. I leave my cell phone on EVERY.SINGLE.MINUTE. And I'm terrified every time it rings. Yeah, I've gotten those calls.

    He may be on the extreme end of behavior by a PWD, but I bet he's not alone in that behavior. In fact, I KNOW that he has a friend with T1, at school with him, who's traveling a very similar path.
     
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2012
  20. TheFormerLantusFiend

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    Maybe there is no answer to this, but how can he think he's being responsible when he knows his drinking has lead to multiple emergency calls?
    Just wondering if that's really what he's thinking, and if it is, how.
     

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