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Which, if any, of these do you consider a sharp?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by mamattorney, Jan 29, 2014.

  1. mamattorney

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    Like the title says - which of the things in the picture below would you consider a sharp? From left to right: 1) the bottom of the fill syringe for the t:slim. It is a needle with a screw on cap; 2) Fastclix lancet drum; 3) cleo infusion set introducer needle housing

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Megnyc

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    Only the needle with cap. If the top to the cleo screws back on (and I believe it does) then I don't think it is a sharp. I use the mio infusion sets and just pop the top back on and stick them in the trash. Lancet drums go in the trash as well. Only actual syringes and dex inserters go in the sharps container.

    ETA: When I say that I don't think it is a sharp, I mean that I think it can go in the normal garbage.
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2014
  3. Junosmom

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    I was wondering about Dexcom inserters. So, treat like a sharp? For the Omnipod, we clip off the needles used to fill pods and throw out the syringe.
     
  4. ksartain

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    Anything that penetrates the skin. Definitely the lancet. I am not familiar with the other items. We put all Omnipods, lancet drums, and Dexcom inserters in our sharp container (a large plastic empty coffee bin). We also put in Omnipod syringes just for good measure.
     
  5. virgo39

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    I don't know about the inserter. I suppose they are technically "sharps", but I guess I'd want to know the purpose of the question. If it is related to disposal, then it would not view the lancet drum as requiring special disposal.

    We use the Omnipod. We clip the needle off the fill syringe and treat the rest of the syringe like regular trash. We recycle the pods and toss Multiclix drums in the regular trash . We use a sharps container only for used pen needles (which we use pretty infrequently).
     
  6. mamattorney

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    Yes, this is a disposal related question - which of these, and also include the Dexcom inserter (which I forgot about), need to go in a special sharps container for disposal, and which can go in the regular trash?
     
  7. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    If it's capped or otherwise contained I don't consider it a sharp. Maybe because I know that my kid doesn't have a blood borne infectious disease I figure her contained or capped "sharps" are about as dangerous as the neighbors snotty tissues. (rollie)

    We recap everything - it all just goes in the regular trash.
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2014
  8. hdm42

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    I put the needle tip from the t:slim syring in the sharps container. The multiclix lancet drum and the dexcom inserted are contained, so they go in the trash. We use inset pump sites. My husband pulls the needle out with pliers, and that goes into the sharps container as well.
     
  9. Megnyc

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    Basically, I put anything that I feel has the potential to somehow poke someone in the sharps container. I wouldn't want someone to somehow come in contact with the needle and have to worry or get tested. Even though I know they don't pose a risk, someone who doesn't know me has no way of knowing that.
     
  10. mamattorney

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    Interesting. I throw all of these (including Dexcom) into the regular trash except for the t slim needle. I think I should check the Dexcom inserter a little more closely and see if the plunger could be pushed in way so that the needle comes out. If it can, I'll switch that to the sharps container, too. I was just looking at the capped needle and wondered if it really was a hazard, since it's capped and it never touches human fluids.
     
  11. swellman

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    I throw everything into the trash. If it has a needle, like the Omnipod syringe or a regular syringe, I make sure the needle is bent completely over and the cap replaced. If they can't be pierced it's not a risk.
     
  12. RomeoEcho

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    I am generally a needle bender too, including for sure-t sets. My disposal is often based on convenience honestly. Real sharps disposal in my city is annoying, so most of it ends up in the trash anyway, and whether it goes in a seperate container depends how long I'd have to cary the trash to get it home to a bottle. When I was in college I'd buy a bottle of soda with many meals and drop my syringe in the empty. I don't drink soda anymore.

    Since I know I've been tested for the scary bood borne things, I'm more worried about perceived harm than actual harm. If it looks like a "needle" I'll try to prevent it more than something people might confuse with an office supply or tool.
     
  13. Junosmom

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    I use the BD Safe-Clip Needle Clipping/Storage Device for Omnipod refill syringes to clip the needle and throw out the plastic syringe. It will not clip the inside needle of a pen needle, so I didn't use it when we were on MDI, and if I remember right, the needle doesn't fit well into the hole to clip.

    The dexcom inserter does retract into, but then also does extend out of, the tube. My dr office will accept sharps, so I guess in the future I'll give them the inserters.

    Edit: forgot to ask:
    When recycling Pods, is it just for the plastic? I wonder that there might be retrievable metals, a battery for consideration, etc, but then there is insulin inside. I saw someone online had taken used pods and made Christmas ornaments with them. My first thought was that they likely contained insulin still, and should anyone be handling them? We have a recycling program here, but I put pods in the trash because there doesn't seem to be a protocol for throwing away insulin.
     
  14. Christopher

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    Per the FDA:

    Examples of sharps include:

    •Needles – hollow needles used to inject drugs (medication) under the skin
    •Syringes – devices used to inject medication into or withdraw fluid from the body
    •Lancets, also called “fingerstick” devices – instruments with a short, two-edged blade used to get drops of blood for testing. Lancets are commonly used in the treatment of diabetes.
    •Auto Injectors, including epinephrine and insulin pens – syringes pre-filled with fluid medication designed to be self-injected into the body
    •Infusion sets – tubing systems with a needle used to deliver drugs to the body.
    •Connection needles/sets – needles that connect to a tube used to transfer fluids in and out of the body. This is generally used for patients on home hemodialysis.


    I simply collect the used syringes and lancets in a heavy duty plastic container, like you get at the store that juice or soda comes in. When it gets full I cap it, write "Sharps" on the outside and throw it in the garbage. It is best to follow your community waste guidelines for disposing of the container. These guidelines vary depending on where you live. Here are some general guidelines:

    All sharps disposal containers should be:
    • made of a heavy-duty plastic;
    • able to close with a tight-fitting, puncture-proof lid, without sharps being able to come out;
    • upright and stable during use;
    • leak-resistant; and
    • properly labeled.
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2014
  15. mamattorney

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    I didn't realize that the infusion set itself (not introducer needle) is considered a sharp. It does have a needle, so it makes sense.

    I also did a read through the dexcom manual last night. It didn't necessarily say whether the inserter is a sharp or not, it said:

    "Consult your local waste management authorities for instructions

    to dispose of devices containing electronic waste (transmitter and
    receiver) and blood contacting parts (sensor and applicator)."

    So, Dexcom is expands things from "sharp" to "blood contact" - but that would expand to band-aids and nosebleeds, too.

     
  16. MEVsmom

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    If you go by my daughter's school everything involved is. They make her put used alchohol pads and test strips in a sharps container. I'm not sure what they do if a non D kid has a bloody nose or picked a scab. It seems the same to me.

    At home, I put the pen needles in a container and that's it. The Fastclix drums seem contained to me so I don't worry with those and just toss them in the regular trash most of the time.
     

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