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When to train school nurse re: pump

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by BittysMom, Feb 17, 2012.

  1. BittysMom

    BittysMom Approved members

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    Just got back from talking pumps with our CDE. Apparently it gets put on C with saline at a Thursday pump class and then you return on a Mon or Tues where they switch to insulin and C will be having both breakfast and lunch there. I had no idea it was this involved... but on to my question though-

    At which point is the school nurse taught how to use it? Would I go up the day/days that there is just saline to practice? How did you all handle this? Thanks.
     
  2. caspi

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    Some pump companies will send a rep to the school to train staff - you may want to call and ask. I just went in one day and went over everything that she needed to know. I gave her an extra manual and if she had questions, she'd call me.
     
  3. BittysMom

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    You make it sound so simple, that gives me hope :D
     
  4. JaxDad

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    Our nurse met us at the class when we were getting the pump. We also gave her copies of the info we received ahead of time. She knows just the basics of BG corrections and meal bolus. She knows nothing of temp basals, priming, or anything else - nor would I expect her to.
     
  5. cdninct

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    We were not allowed to do the training at DS's nursery school (it's the law in CT for daycares and, I think, public schools that only doctors, nurses, CDEs and a few other specified people can do pump training), but every place has different rules. You'd be smart to check into the regulations in NY in advance.
     
  6. caspi

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    Yes, I think this is important so as to not overwhelm them. My son's pod had to be changed a few times in elementary school and the first time I walked her through what to do on the phone. Thereafter she had no problems.

    Now that my son is in middle school, he can do a pod change himself if necessary so we didn't even show the nurse anything. I just gave her info so she had it.
     
  7. hawkeyegirl

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    Training the nurse on the pump will not take long. We trained two preschool teachers who had no prior D-related experience in about 15 minutes. It took less time for our school nurse. Basically, all she needs to be able to do is to deliver a bolus and read and clear any sort of alarm message. Anything more than that, I walk her through on the phone.

    In my opinion, having her attend pump training or even sending a rep out to train her is massive overkill. What I would do is just go to the school on one of the saline days and disconnect your daughter from the pump. Take it into the nurse and show her how to bolus, navigate the menus, and clear alarms. I'd probably even leave the pump with her for the day so that she could practice, since it won't be delivering insulin then anyway. She can hook your daughter back up before she comes home that evening.
     
  8. JaxDad

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    I agree with that - even though that's the way it happened in our case. We were following the CDE's advice.....lemmings at the time.
     
  9. mysweetwill

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    I am taking this advice, I think it's a great idea, thank you!
     
  10. Lindy

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    ahhhhh - it is not always so simple! First - you must have a person WILLING to be trained by you (the parent). Not everyone is so blessed to have this situation! And, a rep can be really good. As explained to me - sometimes it may be easier to ask questions and make mistakes in front of a rep and not a parent whose child's life depends on you!
     
  11. hawkeyegirl

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    I would be massively unhappy if anyone that we've trained was unwilling to be trained by me. These pumps truly can be operated at a basic level by a 1st grader. It ain't rocket science. And any school nurse who is unwilling to ask me questions or make a mistake in front of me...BIG red flag. I'm going to be her contact person with questions and "mistakes" for years to come. She'd better get used to it from the beginning.

    That being said, if you want the rep to train the nurse, go for it. But it's really not necessary.
     
  12. virgo39

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    I "trained" our nurse in a short session before school started. I also gave her the "Omnipod Caregiver Manual", which has nice step-by-step instructions with screen shots (and this year I made a one page sheet of screen shots with instructions specific to DD -- mainly for use by substitutes).

    I don't expect our nurse to do site changes and have not trained her on temp basals or some of the other features of the pump, but she understands how to give a bolus for carbs only, a bolus for correction only, and a bolus for both.
     
  13. BittysMom

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    Thanks everyone. So it sounds like it'll work out fine. It's just hard to imagine how long it'll take to train someone else when I haven't learned myself. I was thinking it's mostly the menu navigation that she'll have to get the hang of. I definitely don't want to overwhelm her.
     
  14. MommaKat

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    One question beyond the basics listed - wouldn't you want the nurse or aid to also know how to suspend the pump in the event of severe low?
     
  15. hawkeyegirl

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    Hmmmm. It never really crossed my mind. I've never suspended his pump. I guess I figure if he had a low THAT severe, she'd be on the phone to me anyway. I don't think I'd want her making the call whether to suspend or not. (i think she'd be able to figure it out anyway. The MM menus are super intuitive.)
     

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