- advertisement -

When to Tell a Teen about LT Complications

Discussion in 'Parents of Teens' started by ppalmer, May 28, 2011.

  1. zakksmom

    zakksmom Approved members

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2009
    Messages:
    245
    Great prospective and very well said..
     
  2. MamaBear

    MamaBear Approved members

    Joined:
    Jul 20, 2010
    Messages:
    1,906
    I have to agree with this, because the horror stories is something we experienced right off. I've had to discuss correct info with my son, in order to get his mind off of stories other people should have kept to themselves.
     
  3. Heather(CA)

    Heather(CA) Approved members

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2007
    Messages:
    10,153
    This is exactly how I feel about it :) Well said
     
  4. OSUMom

    OSUMom Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2006
    Messages:
    5,324
    When my son was diagnosed, one of the first things he said was great my life span is 15 years less. :( He learned this in health class.

    To be honest, I'd be more inclined to speak to kids not about what complications could be waiting for them, but rather about how they can be healthy just like everyone else. It could be they've already heard negative comments in school, on the internet, or on tv. In my opinion as a parent my job was to be positive and talk about how with proper management he'll live a long, healthy life.
     
  5. hawkeyegirl

    hawkeyegirl Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2007
    Messages:
    13,157
    This is a fantastic post. Thank you for the information. I'm not one to dwell on the negative, but turns out even my generally positive spin on things can be boosted. :)
     
  6. Lee

    Lee Approved members

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2006
    Messages:
    9,633
    I just had an hour long late-night convo with Coco...just random things about life in general. What she wanted to do, who she wanted to marry, how many kids in life, how rich she was going to be - just great conversations of life - and not once, not one single time, in this open hearted, sometimes touchy subjected conversation, did she even say diabetes...it never entered her mind.

    And that was beautiful. End of story.

    Complications - she hears them. She knows them. But really, I have decided to not let them rule her life. And they do not.
     
  7. dejahthoris

    dejahthoris Approved members

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2011
    Messages:
    514

    Thank you Jeff!!!! This should be more than a sticky, this should automatically go to every poster!
     
  8. mmgirls

    mmgirls Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2008
    Messages:
    6,030
    Excuse me jumpimg in here even thow my dd will not be in this group for more than 6yrs from now, but I do have a bit of purspective since she has had "d" for more than 5 years.

    ASk yourself, are you more afraid of what he will "hear", or more afraid of the actual complications?

    For me it is what she might hear.

    In the past 5 yars she has heard, "that terrible desease TOOK my father", and "diabetes killed my gran papa", and doestn't tat hurt and all the like.

    And all I have said is that it is not the Diabetes that hurt that person, but that they did not know that they had "d" (T2 late DX) or that they were not making sure that their body was as heathy as it should be (T1 or T2 referrence), I then go on to explain that we ARE making sure her body is as healthy as it should be, by testing and CGMing and counting carbs and thinking about what is going on in her life.

    Complications may still happen, and it may have nothing to do with D. But I am NOT going to instill a fear of complications in order to gain compliance in D care.

    Take what I say with a grain of salt, as I have many years till the TEEN years.
     
  9. hawkeyegirl

    hawkeyegirl Approved members

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2007
    Messages:
    13,157
    I'm not entirely sure what I'll tell Jack when, so I have no real horse in this race. But I don't think people are trying to instill a fear of complications in their kids, exactly. I see it more as explaining why it's important that our kids take good care of themselves. Sometimes teen brains are not so good at connecting the dots. :cwds:
     
  10. hrtmom3

    hrtmom3 Approved members

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2007
    Messages:
    1,128
    About four years back Tim was having his yearly eye exam. The look on his face when the doctor told him he needed glass said it all. When the doctor left the room, Tim says, "I don't want to go blind". I had never talked with him prior to that about complications. He obviously had done his own research. Of course the needing of glasses had nothing to do with D. Although, it was then we first talked about possible complications. It was also mentioned that not all people with D have complications. Discussion also included the importance of taking care of himself the best he could. Never once though, has it been said, if you don't take care of yourself this is what will or could happen.
     
  11. OSUMom

    OSUMom Approved members

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2006
    Messages:
    5,324
    I think it's important to remember, like you've mentioned Martha, that teenagers don't get all their information from parents. Whether or not there's a discussion in the home, teenagers are going to find accurate or inaccurate information from other sources. Chances are there's a great deal of fear already - expressed verbally or not.
     
    Last edited: Jun 1, 2011
  12. cockatiel

    cockatiel Approved members

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2008
    Messages:
    147
    Love this!
     
  13. wilf

    wilf Approved members

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2007
    Messages:
    9,652
    I'm hoping it wasn't intended on your part, but this post could be interpreted as implying that some of us parents of teens would "instill a fear of complications in order to gain compliance in D care".

    I think you may have mistaken the thinking behind our posts if that is where you think we're coming from.

    From my perspective, the only reason I'll be telling my teen about complications is because I think it's better she hears it from me in a supportive and calm setting than from a random stranger at some random time.
     
  14. MissEmi

    MissEmi Approved members

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2008
    Messages:
    1,899
    As a PWD dx'd at 14---it's a lot better to hear these things from your mom than everyone else. Because people WILL say stuff. When you explain them, you can tell him that all of these things don't happen to every PWD. When others talk to him, they use the direct correlation approach: Grandpa went blind/died from diabetes, you will too. It's important for him to understand that this isn't always the case, but it is a possibility. Richard157 wrote a book about living with Type 1 for a very long time, which could be a positive way to look at it.

    On a side note, I have had glasses WAYYY longer than Type 1, and my prescription hasn't changed since dx. For young children, having to have glasses can just be part of the growth process. If we got rid of contacts for a day, I think people would be amazed at JUST HOW MANY people actually need vision correction. And most of them do NOT have diabetes.
     

Share This Page

- advertisement -

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice