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What were your kids' thoughts/reactions....

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by Lauren2211, Jan 19, 2010.

  1. Lauren2211

    Lauren2211 Approved members

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    To the idea of pumping before they started?

    Michael refuses to even entertain the idea. Michael is doing great on MDIs and I am not looking for him to pump right now. He is also very involved in his own care (testing by himself, packing/carb counting his own lunches, and doing some of his own shots). That's why I say switching at this point would be(in part) his choice, though some I've talked to disagree. If he were doing poorly on MDIs, and I felt that going to the pump would fix it, of course I would make the decision.

    Michael is not making his decision uninformed. I have two adult aquaintances on pumps. We have visited both, talked to each about thier pumps, and he got to "help" one person do her new site. He asked countless questions and thought about it before deciding his answer was no. Since then it has not been a subject he wishes to discuss.
     
  2. sam1nat2

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    Sam was 7 when he started pumping and he was excited about it. The MM rep is one of his good friend's dad--who also has d.

    We were still honeymooning at the time so he wasn't taking many shots and wanted to pump so he didn't have to.

    Sounds like maybe he just isn't ready quite yet. Maybe he can try it with the understanding that if he truly isn't ready, he can always go back to shots??? I would think he would enjoy the freedom it provides, but then again, some people are just comfortable with MDI...
     
  3. spamid

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    I think the child's opinion needs to be taken seriously, especially if he is already doing much of his own care. The pump is another tool to deliver insulin, and it is wonderful. However, there are many children and adults who do fine without it. One thing to remember is that we are teaching our children to handle this disease as adults, you don't want to sour your son now when he may change his mind.
     
  4. denise3099

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    Wow, and he's so young. That's great. DD tests herself but other than that she wasn't actively managing her care. She now does bolus on the pump, but I tell her how many carbs to put in.

    dd DID NOT want a pump. She didn't mind shots and didn't like change. I felt her bs was all over the map so that's why I wanted one. It turns out her bs is still all over (better but still) and that the lack of shots and convinience for her and for caregivers are actually the greatest perks for us. And that I test a lot more and the pump is actually more work for me.

    Personally, I believe in retail therapy and bribing. So I explained that this was something I wanted her to TRY for a month and that she deserved a reward for doing so. She picked a trip to Toys R Us in Times Square--we live in Northen NJ--with spending money. So that's what she got at the end of the month. She also got to pick the color, the skin, several pump pouches, a toy pump for her doll, and the location of the sites. That's enough "choice" for a 7 yr old, in my opinion. Well after a week she was hooked and wouldn't trade it for anything. And I just ordered groovy patches so that's another fun pump thing to look forward to.

    I havn't even mentioned the CGM I'm trying to get for her! Any body know where I can get a pony cheap? ;)
     
  5. MamaChrissa

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    Jason was 4 when he began pumping. (1 week after DX) I did not ask his opinion then. I simply told him this is how we will be taking care of his D from now on. Maybe this makes me a mean mom, but Im not sure were he diagnosed last week, at 7, I would be asking his opinion. Since I am the one doing the majority of the care and am the adult, I get to make the choice as to what is best for him. When he has the D knowledge and maturity to care for himself independently, he can choose whatever he wants, but until that time *I* get the deciding vote.

    But I am definitely a "pump snob", so take my opinion with a grain of salt. I think everyone with D should try one and they should be offered at DX :)
     
  6. Lauren2211

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    Believe me, I was pleasantly surprised at his taking such an active role. I shouldn't have been. He is also the kind to clean his room w/o me asking. He's an alien I tell you:rolleyes: Had it been my 5yr old daughter it would be a completely different story.

    Not a mean mom, just a mom with a different (from mine:D) kid. If Michael wasn't doing well on MDIs, or (for other reasons) I felt the pump was what was needed for us NOW, I would make the decision and that would be it. I'm sure he'll use one eventually:cool:
     
  7. chbarnes

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    Chris was an 11 yo techie at dx. He hates shots - a lot. He searched the internet and saw Team Type I with their Omnipods and had to have one.

    Chuck
     
  8. piratelight

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    Hunter was not thrilled with the idea of a pump initially. We talked to his endo and they gave us some information and DVD's. He watched them and played some pump expedition game on-line and then changed his mind and was interested in pumping.
     
  9. lisanc

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    I am glad he is doing so well!! My daughter was diagnosed Mar '09 and had been doing really well on shots (last A1Cs = 6.3 & 7.2) and age 8. We are planning on going on pump on Spring Break and cannot wait!!:D

    I think what turned the tide for her was coming out of honeymoon and having so many little corrections. Also it is hard for Lantus to be perfect for basal as it is rare for basal rates to be flatlined. So when she went to play at a friends house if she needed a correction it is more of an inconvenience with shots and we hope with pump will be easier for her to be more independent. Also, coming out of honeymoon we hope it will be a better match with her basal needs.

    She is very mature and involved like your son and maybe as he goes along and needs corrections or sees that it is harder with MDI to make changes to needs (ie. if sick, coming out of honeymoon, changing schedule) he might be more interested.

    But, I wouldn't push him into it until he is ready and excited about it, my guess is he will get there as he goes along.

    Lisa
     
  10. tom_ethansdad

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    Ethan was 3 and a half when he started pumping not long ago. He didn't want to do it because he didn't like the thought of getting poked for the infusion set. We moved slow with him, working at his pace. We would occassionally talk about the pump, went to a beginning pump class but didn't push anything, visited friends whose kids had pumps and the like. He eventually agreed to try having a set attached, but no pump. So our next endo appointment we did that. He was OK with that, and we switched it out for a new set after three days, a normal site change cycle for the pump we wanted. Again he was OK with that. But once that was done he still didn't want a pump. Most pump companies have a 30 day return policy where if you don't like it or it just isn't going to work for you, you can return it. So we asked Ethan if he would try it. He indicated he really didn't want it but was willing to try it.

    So we did and he immediately loved it, starting with the very first meal after having the pump on and I said "time for your insulin", took the pump, pressed a couple of buttons and told him I was done. The look on his face was priceless. He has loved it ever since and would never go back to shots.

    I agree with you allowing your son to have input in this, especially given how much maturity he has shown with his care so far.
     
  11. fdlafon

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    Jordan was very interested and eager to pump. However, he was also much older, and the freedom of eating when he wants made a difference to him/us.
     
  12. denise3099

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    Oh, the other thing that helped was that dd and I BOTH got an infusion set to try. She loved seeing me with an infusion set and I could understand better how it really felt. Then when we changed the set, I did hers and she did mine. It hurt! We tried a different set after that with an inserter. this was before we started on an actual pump.

    If your son is fine on mdi and so are you then don't push it. MDI is a perfectly acceptable treatment option. If you or he are not fine and you truly think this is best, then you have to "persuade" him to just try it (bribe, cajole, etc.). If he still hates it after a month, then you'll have to return it since it's not worth having him meserable over his care.
     
  13. frizzyrazzy

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    Ian was 6 1/2 when we started pumping and he wanted absolutely no part in it what so ever. He would rather die now than go back to shots.

    Sometimes mama knows best. :)
     
  14. HBMom

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    My DS was diagnosed at 9, but wasn't interested in the pump until he was 12. Because his A1C's were ok, we didn't push it, but as they started to go up we talked about it more (and so did his endo) and he realized it was something he needed to try (and of course now would never go back).
     
  15. owensmom

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    I like this!

    As a parent I believe that it is my job to challenge my children. To teach them to live and try new things even when those things fall outside of their comfort zone. If cost was not an issue and I believed that there might be any benefit to my child or family as a whole in trying something new then it would become a non-issue. We would try it. However, I would not have actively explored or researched a new technology with my child until both my husband and I had done our homework and been sold on it.
     
  16. Traci

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    Liam was in kindergarten and had no interest in pumping--and neither did I. He had d since he was 23 months old. Like you, we had good control on shots and he didn't mind them. Then one day at an endo appt, we met an angel in the waiting room. She was 16 and just a beautiful girl. She started talking to Liam and I quickly realized she was just as beautiful on the inside. She showed him her pump and answered all of our questions honestly and thoughtfully. She gave both of us the courage to try the pump. We let it be his decision, but gave lots of encouragement.

    If your son hates it, he can always go back to shots.
     
  17. Lee

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    Do you want him to try the pump? I am not sure why, if things are going so great, you would want to change?

    Don't get me wrong, we LOVE our pump! But - we wanted to switch...and yes, life is easier for us on pumping.
     
  18. sunnydays

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    Kobe is 3 and we started pumping last week. We talked to him about it for a month before we started to give him an idea of what was coming. He was excited about it when we showed him the actual pump. He was scared when we put the first infusion set in. Then he complained for a couple days about the pump and the pouch. He's very active and I think he felt like it was getting in his way. Now he loves it because he realizes that insulin no longer means getting a shot. Yesterday he smiled and said "this insulin doesn't hurt like the one in the needle."

    We had very good control with MDI so I was reluctant to change, but now I am glad that we did.
     
  19. diabetesgoddess

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    My son was five when he started pumping and wanted nothing to do with the idea. He did not mind the 8-10 injections he was getting each day. It was all that he knew and he is not big on change. Despite that, Mom knew that it was best for him and I let him chose things like the pump color, whether to use numbing cream or not and where to place the sites. The rest was my choice. I had done the research and I felt that it was the best tool. We also had great control on MDI and actually had our highest A1c before puberty when we first switched.

    Some kids (and adults) do not like tubing or being attached to something 24/7. You know your child better than anyone. Good luck with whatever you decide.
     
  20. Madisonsmom

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    Madison wanted a pump right away when we were in the hospital at DX we were told about a pump. After a few weeks of shots she was all for a pump. We had to wait a year for th epump per our Endo.

    She loves it now I still remeber the day it came in the mail she wa sso happy jumping out of her skin called all her friends.

    Mabey you could let him watch some of the dvds the pimp companies will come to your house and show you pumps. Mabey that would get him on board once he had one in hand.
     

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