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What information would you want a "soon to be teacher" to know about Type 1 Diabetes?

Discussion in 'Parents of Children with Type 1' started by mmgirls, Apr 5, 2014.

  1. mmgirls

    mmgirls Approved members

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    I have a poster presentation that I need to have done my Monday that I have procrastinated on and looking for help to narrow down the "key" topics, to a 12 minute talk.

    This is a Special Education class talking about Students with disabilities in the General Education setting, while a great majority of our kids do not need "Special education services' due to their Diabetes I feel strongly that ANY teacher needs to get a good gist of what Type 1 Diabetes might look like in their classroom.

    I plan on having on hand / attached to me the devices
    * tubed insulin pump
    * omnipod
    * Dexcom CGM 7+
    * BG meter
    * insulin pen / tops
    * Insulin vial / syringes
    * log book

    I plan on talking about
    * etiology & prevalence
    * the many types of Diabetes
    * importance of making prior inclusive choices- IE if there is going to be food/drink let caregivers know before hand
    * possible accommodations
    * working in Diabetes tasks into a normal day
    * every family/child is different - not becoming biased from prior/past

    I think that is more than enough for 12 minute, but do you think those are the most important topics for soon to be teachers?
     
  2. MomofSweetOne

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    I would say the very most important info would be symptoms of severe lows and highs, along with the information that lows can not be scheduled, that they happen even with good control, and that every family with diabetes will not address the disease in the same way, nor have the same target numbers.
     
  3. rgcainmd

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    Looks like a very thorough outline to me. Good luck, and please let us know how it goes!
     
  4. mmgirls

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    Yes thank you, I plan on supplying them with a handout of the classical onset symptoms and will include the low/high symptoms on the backside.
     
  5. coeen

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    Sounds like you have it all.
    I am a teacher and my son goes to school with me. How awesome is that? :)
    I made sure each classroom or special he goes into has an emergency supply kit tucked away.
    It is just a little kit with tabs, juice, and a meter with strips. You never know when a fire drill or lock down could happen. His main classroom teacher has a bigger kit with more things in it just incase the school gets evacuated and they have to walk away from the school to another safe place.
    Good luck on your presentation.
     
  6. ksartain

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    A biggie for me would be to emphasize that every T1D's diabetes is different. My son's sugar is highly sensitive to physical activity. Someone else might not be. Just because one child two years ago always treated one way does not mean that works for everyone else.
     
  7. mmgirls

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    I got that covered with:
    * every family/child is different - not becoming biased from prior/past

    There is a kiddo 1 year ahead of my oldest and for 1st and 2nd grade she had the same teacher that the other child had had, inevitably both teachers were amazed on how different T1D could be handled in the classroom.
     
  8. mmgirls

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    Good point, just as a general rule every teacher needs to know a bit about T1D even if the child is not in their class.
     
  9. mmc51264

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    I am a former teacher, a current RN and the mom of a T1. Be prepared for the parents/child that are non-compliant or have not been educated properly. YOU may be the one referring the family to the school nurse for help. Also, be prepared for parents to perhaps be a little defensive and/or mistrustful. We have had good experiences and bad experiences. Every family is different, good and bad. Educate yourself about the law. ADA, 504 plans, IEP.
    I applaud you for being proactive in your learning about T1!!!
     
  10. Sarah Maddie's Mom

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    Yikes! did you really just type "non-complaint"??
     
    Last edited: Apr 10, 2014
  11. dpr

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    Another thing is the yard staff and aides should have some training too. Last year at our school an older "self managing" student went down during recess. He was conscious but unable to stand or help himself in any way. The aides, who I as a parent trained, knew exactly what to do, went and got my daughters low supplies and treated him. Our principal has thanked me many time for all the time and help I have spent with the school staff teaching them about diabetes. He says most of the d parents has dealt with over the years see school as their vacation away from diabetes for the day and have zero diabetes related interaction with the school in relation to the safety of their children. Obviously those are parents that don't visit this forum :)
     
  12. mmgirls

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    Yes I plan on tackling that when I speak about specials classroom, RTI interventions, recess, lock down situations. Everyone need to know the basics even if you are not the Childs teacher.

    I found this JDRF youtube video that I may show, it almost 10 minutes long so I would have to ask to speak for longer. But I actually liked the video.
     
  13. Beach bum

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    I'd also emphasize lows and highs and how it impacts all kids differently. Novo Nordisk has that great chart with the cartoon character, I'd make copies of that to hand out. In addition, I'd touch on behavior. If a child with diabetes is acting out of character, request that child is escorted to the nurse or have the child check BG's prior to even thinking of reprimanding.
    Maybe have a list with bullet points to hand out.

    Keep it simple, clear, concise.
     
  14. missmakaliasmomma

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    We have this issue at our 504 meetings. "We've had blah blah blah number of diabetics and we've never had someone have the intense management your daughter has"

    Obviously they think that everyone's diseases are the same..They're the ones that gave my dd a nurse when her orders only called for an aide.. Not my fault. Maybe I am the nutso parent (ok I am lol) but I always let hem know if she didn't have accommodations, she'd be homeschooled.
     
  15. mmgirls

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    Yes I found a info graphic/ cartoon that has different faces and captions, It is only labeled Type 1 Diabetes symptoms it does not differentiate low or high symptoms, which I really liked because there is cross over between the 2 for my kiddo. This is on one side of my handout and on the other is information of the "warning signs" of Type 1 Diabetes for those that are undiagnosed in one column and in that other column is Low blood sugar emergency information for those that have been diagnosed and on insulin.
     

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